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The Bulletin, No. 5, Second Series, Spring 1934
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The Bulletin, No. 5, Second Series, Spring 1934 - Image 1. Spring 1934. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1909/show/1905.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(Spring 1934). The Bulletin, No. 5, Second Series, Spring 1934 - Image 1. Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1909/show/1905

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Bulletin, No. 5, Second Series, Spring 1934 - Image 1, Spring 1934, Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023/item/1909/show/1905.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Bulletin, No. 5, Second Series, Spring 1934
Contributor (Local)
  • Heiser, Joseph M., Jr.
Publisher Outdoor Nature Club
Date Spring 1934
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Ornithology
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 2007-023, Box 14, Folder 30
Original Collection Outdoor Nature Club Records
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/?p=collections/controlcard&id=373
Digital Collection Outdoor Nature Club Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/2007_023
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://libraries.uh.edu/branches/special-collections/
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Image 1
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_2007_023_b014_f030_004_001.jpg
Transcript THE OUTDOOR NATURE CLUB of HOUSTON, TEXAS BULLETIN No. 5 Second Series SPRING 1934 I Dine With The Celebrities By R. A. SELL I eat bear meat with the president of the United States at Sitka, Alaska. President Harding, "the Great White Father," gets up from the table to shake hands and exchange felicitations with a native Indian chief. Although he was clad in deerskins and otter fur, the chief was not timid. He did more than his share of the talking. But the president was gracious and patient, and when the Indians struck up their drums and tomtoms and surprising "Wah-wah-wah," it was time for the "White Father" to gesture for his white guests to stand and cheer. Anything can happen in Los Angeles. >\. we were hardly prepared .for Mary rford and Jack at a rather common- _ce luncheon. "America's Sweetheart" "poised a short salad fork between the tips of her thumb, middle and ring fingers, and, with the index finger pointing, she jabbed straight down to gig an olive. The playwright, philosopher-naturalist, Maurice Maeterlinck, appeared to be timid, reserved and self-conscious. Fluent with the music-box French, he only stammered a two-syllable word when he was introduced to some one. Midnight at Oakland, 1915, when one of the longer speeches was grinding along, and the guests were toying with their glasses and spoons, a clerk tiptoes to David Starr Jordan to ask: "Do you wish to release one of the rooms that you have reserved ?" "No. We must keep what we've got. A lone fisherman might come in—cold and wet, shivering and chattering." And 'Ms from the world's greatest authority »the subject of fish, jnos A. Mills of Long's Peak, Colo., ,xid of posting himself among the rocks near a little mountain pool where wild animals frequently came to drink. Three mountain goats, an old billy and two nannies, were climbing a narrow defile when they were met by a skunk—a jet- black fellow with a broad stripe and a bushy tail. "Mr. Skunk just walked straight at the goats. Old Billy hesitated, (Continued on page 2) The Miser By ETHEL OSBORN HILL I am a miser in the spring. I grasp each shining hour And hide it deep within my heart, While from each blossomy bower I snatch a picture, priceless, rare, To hang in Memory's hall, And tune my heart's receiving set To catch each songbird's call. My mental fingers tightly clutch Each precious gem I find, Like dewdrop diamonds, crystal clear, And store them in my mind. For gold I measure sunshine's glow; For silver, moonlight's gleam; And greedily I hoard away Each happy, rose-hued dream. All these I store in Memory's vault Against that coming day When all is cold and dark and drear, And Spring is far away. Then, miser-like, I'll lock my door And take my treasures out; I'll gaze upon my pictures rare And spread my gems about. My rainbow dreams I'll then unpack And count them, one by one, And warm my soul at Memory's fire, Aglow with springtime sun. Old Winter then may rage and storm; With him I'll have no part— For I'll be gloating o'er the wealth I've stored up in my heart. Spring Rhapsody By MARCELLUS E. FOSTER You may not believe in evolution as far as the human race is concerned, but when it comes to flowers we do know there has been a constant change, often an improvement and frequently a mingling of the wild and the tamed which produces something more beautiful and gorgeous. Maybe you never had a centuries- removed ancestor who was a fish or a monkey, but the modern miracle called the chrysanthemum took the Japanese long years to produce and no doubt it was once an ox-eyed daisy. For all you know, it started from a lump of coal that got restless when a hummingbird's bill kissed it and left some pollen on its black face—the yellow dust of new life that had been gathered while flitting (Continued on page 2) A Wasp Called The Mud-Dauber By CARL V. JARRELL There flows down the stream of life by your side, and intertwined with you, the other countless creatures of earth, all dreaming dreams, all hoping and waiting, all endowed by the same force of intelligence. Your genius appears akin to them all. Your romance of life, perhaps, varies only in degree. We are interested in the many operations of the law which appear as inexorable and as final as do the forces that make their operations possible. "What law determines the time factor between the egg and the mature insect with the same precision and with the same regularity as the rising of tomorrow's sun and its setting at the end of day in the western sky? What law says to one insect its transition period shall be of a few days, or a few weeks, or many months, and to another decrees that many years will come and go before they attain maturity? Who breathes the spark of life into one lonely chrysalis and says, "Come forth," and to another says, "Not yet" ? What law of life gives to you the constancy of purpose that is a marvel to the race of men ? What fate hangs out the red lantern at the crossroads and points you the way beyond the bicker and the strife that enables you to escape the hallucinations of men that bring about his infirmity of will ? What power is given your offspring to attain maturity unaided ? Then plan and build and live to destiny's end, without instruction, compared to some other children of earth, who are nurtured to growth, then, in the main, seldom plan, and rarely build except when directed ? Then She Disappears She went away one evening and something told me she would never return and that I would finish this narrative by the light of the inspiration she had left behind. We are conscious of a power which has inspired her with an abiding faith. We divine a force which has impelled her to go forth without mental confusion or (Continued on page 3)