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"You Can't Stop NOW!" National Organization for Women 7th National Conference souvenir journal
File 012
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National Organization for Women. "You Can't Stop NOW!" National Organization for Women 7th National Conference souvenir journal - File 012. 1974. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 24, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1996_007/item/910/show/893.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Organization for Women. (1974). "You Can't Stop NOW!" National Organization for Women 7th National Conference souvenir journal - File 012. Selections from the Marjorie Randal National Women’s Conference Collection. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1996_007/item/910/show/893

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Organization for Women, "You Can't Stop NOW!" National Organization for Women 7th National Conference souvenir journal - File 012, 1974, Selections from the Marjorie Randal National Women’s Conference Collection, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 24, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1996_007/item/910/show/893.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title "You Can't Stop NOW!" National Organization for Women 7th National Conference souvenir journal
Creator
  • National Organization for Women
Publisher National Organization for Women
Date 1974
Language eng
Subject
  • Feminism
  • Women's rights
  • National Women's Conference
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • souvenirs
  • pamphlets
Type
  • Text
Identifier ID 1996-007, Box 2, Folder 17
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Carey C. Shuart Women’s Research Collection
  • Marjorie Randal National Women's Conference Collection
Donor Randal, Marjorie
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript barring States from enforcing compulsory leave for pregnant schoolteachers months before delivery time. In Family Life— • NOW and the new feminism have contributed substantially to changing attitudes affecting family life, including: ° Re-evaluation of rigidly defined sex roles which have prevented men from participating fully in family life and have led to female domination of the home. ° Emerging relationships between women and men based on egalitarianism and mutual respect, rather than old patterns of dominance and submission. ° A new climate of opinion on women's right to control her own reproductive processes, including access to contraception and abortion. Motherhood is no longer regarded as the only avenue of fulfillment for women. ° New attitudes toward child-rearing which eliminate practices that serve to inhibit both boys and girls in developing to their fullest their unique individual potential. • NOW's Older Women Task Force encourages older people to strive for creative, active and satisfying lives and is working to improve conditions under the law, including Social Security rights and benefits. • NOW launched a successful large-scale fund-raising drive aimed at saving the Supreme Court decision on abortion by an educational campaign against a proposed amendment to the U.S. Constitution which would prohibit abortion. Under the Law— • NOW was instrumental in passage of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) to the Constitution by both houses of Congress after half a century of foot-dragging and has played a leading role in state ratification campaigns. In the first three months of 1974, three more states—Maine, Montana and Ohio—ratified the ERA, leaving only five states to go for it to become the law of the land. • NOW has been—and continues to be—influential in challenging laws and legal procedures which discriminate against women, including laws governing property rights, marriage and divorce, abortion, employment and educational opportunities, credit and mortgage practices, Social Security and income tax inequities, plus other areas of legal concern affecting the rights of all women. • NOW's National Task Force on Rape and the NOW Legislative Office were instrumental in drafting a bill to establish a National Center for the Prevention and Control of Rape, and contributed significantly to updating the language defining rape. Many state and chapter Task Forces are working to eliminate sexism from the laws and procedures governing rape cases in their states and cities. • NOW was among the organizations which filed suit challenging a New York State law giving women an unqualified exemption from jury duty. • NOW is challenging the federal charter and policies of the Little League that exclude girls from participation. In Education— • Changes are underway in educational systems and institutions to combat the traditions which have kept women in a secondary role in education. ° Increased Women's Studies programs in high schools, colleges and universities. ° Breakdown of sex-role stereotyping in curricula and textbooks. ° Increase in numbers of women in professorial and administrative ranks. ° Elimination of salary differences and retirement benefits based on sex. ° More equitable admissions policies. • NOW urged that Congress pass legislation requiring HEW to undertake a massive and comprehensive study of the status of women in education. • NOW documented the existence of sex-role stereotyping in textbooks and has developed alternatives. In Politics and Government— • The growing power of women in politics can be measured by the increase in women delegates to both Democratic and Republican national conventions in 1972. Over 40% of the Democratic delegates and 30% of the Republican delegates were women, as contrasted to the 1968 conventions with 13% and 17% respectively. Women in both parties succeeded in making strong contributions to the development of national platforms. Additional accomplishments include: ° Formation of the National Women's Political Caucus with state and local caucuses. ° More women candidates for political office than in prior years. NWPC predicts that more than 3,000 women will be seeking office at state and national levels this year, about triple the 1,028 who were candidates in 1972, when 488 women were elected. ° Young women eligible to serve as pages for both houses of Congress, a distinction formerly reserved only for young men. Women increasingly appointed to—and being considered for appointment to—governmental positions at every level. In Images and Attitudes— • We have raised the national consciousness to the stereotyped images of women that have pervaded the media, especially in advertising. Recently we have seen the first signs of constructive change to improve the image of women in a variety of settings and endeavors. • Sexist customs in language are also disappearing, with terms such as "Ms." and "chairperson" coming into wider use. Other areas reflecting new attitudes toward women are: ° Fashion trends emphasizing functional clothing. ° Sports participation opening to females where they were formerly excluded. Increased prize money offered in women's competitive sports and promotion of the idea that women can engage in every phase of sports without "losing femininity." ° Previously "all-male" community and professional organizations, such as the Jaycees, opening their ranks to women. ° A new mood of solidarity and a sense of sisterhood among women, with recognition of the right of every woman to define and express her own sexuality— whether heterosexual or homosexual—and to choose her own life style. ° Creation of a women's press and a renaissance of women in the arts in an atmosphere of new freedom to create—not to masculine standards, but to feminist/ humanist standards. • Challenged the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) and member networks, resulting in NAB officials strengthening 10
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