Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

"You Can't Stop NOW!" National Organization for Women 7th National Conference souvenir journal
File 007
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
National Organization for Women. "You Can't Stop NOW!" National Organization for Women 7th National Conference souvenir journal - File 007. 1974. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 20, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1996_007/item/910/show/888.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Organization for Women. (1974). "You Can't Stop NOW!" National Organization for Women 7th National Conference souvenir journal - File 007. Selections from the Marjorie Randal National Women’s Conference Collection. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1996_007/item/910/show/888

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

National Organization for Women, "You Can't Stop NOW!" National Organization for Women 7th National Conference souvenir journal - File 007, 1974, Selections from the Marjorie Randal National Women’s Conference Collection, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 20, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1996_007/item/910/show/888.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title "You Can't Stop NOW!" National Organization for Women 7th National Conference souvenir journal
Creator
  • National Organization for Women
Publisher National Organization for Women
Date 1974
Language eng
Subject
  • Feminism
  • Women's rights
  • National Women's Conference
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • souvenirs
  • pamphlets
Type
  • Text
Identifier ID 1996-007, Box 2, Folder 17
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Carey C. Shuart Women’s Research Collection
  • Marjorie Randal National Women's Conference Collection
Donor Randal, Marjorie
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript \s FCC , STOP MORE WOMEN NEWS REPORTER. 1 9 The National Organization for Women (NOW) was born June 30, 1966 out of the fury and frustration of 28 women attending the Third National Conference of Commissions on the Status of Women in Washington, D.C. Their fury was understandable. The Commission had been set up by President John F. Kennedy in 1961 under the leadership of Eleanor Roosevelt and three full years had passed since it had first reported (in American Women, The Report of the President's Commission on the Status of Women, in I963) that, despite having won the right to vote, women were discriminated against in virtually every aspect of life. These findings had been reinforced by the reports of the state commissions that had also come into being in the intervening years. Nevertheless, the I966 Conference delegates were prohibited by the Administration's rules for the conference from even passing resolutions recommending that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) enforce its legal mandate to end sex discrimination. Betty Friedan, a conference guest and author of The Feminine Mystique, invited a group of women to her hotel room one night to discuss alternative strategies. It was decided that the only solution was to form a seperate civil rights organization dedicated to achieving full equality for women. It was Friedan who christened it NOW. Kathryn Clarenbach, head of the Wisconsin Commission on the Status of Women, was named temporary coordinator and the women drafted a statement of purpose: "To take action to bring women into full participation in the mainstream of American society NOW, assuming all the privileges and responsibilities thereof in fully equal partnership with men." Thus was born the new feminist movement—and not unlike the way that the original suffragist were inspired to launch their revolution after being frustrated in attempts to take their rightful places as delegates to the 1840 World Anti-Slavery Convention in London. In addition to Clarenbach and Friedan, NOW's 28 founding mothers were: Ada Allness, Mary Benbow, Gene Boyer, Ana- loyce Clapp, Catherine Conroy, Caroline Davis, Mary Eastwood, Edith Finlayson, Dorothy Haener, Anna Roosevelt Halstead, Lorene Harrington, Mary Lou Hill, Esther Johnson, Nancy Knaak, Min L. Matheson, Helen Moreland, Pauli Murray, Ruth Murray, Inka O'Hanrahan, Pauline Parish, Eve P. Purvis, Edna Schwartz, Gretchen Squires, Mary Jane Snyder, Betty Talking- ton, and Caroline Ware. NOW's first organizing conference was held October 29-30, 1966 in Washington, D.C. More than 300 women and men from all parts of the country assembled in the John Phillip Sousa Community Room of the Washington Post building to formulate an organizational structure and philosophy for the united front of the new feminist movement, or as Friedan termed it, "the unfinished revolution." Kathryn Clarenbach was elected NOW's first chairone of the Board and Betty Friedan, NOW's first president. Richard Graham, former EEOC Commissioner, was elected vice president and Caroline Davis, of the United Auto Workers, secretary- treasurer. Other members of NOW's first National Board were: Colleen Boland, Catherine Conroy, Carl Degler, Sister Mary Austin Doherty, Elizabeth Drews, Muriel Fox, Betty Furness, Dorothy Haener, Jane Hart, Anna Hedgeman, Phineas Indritz, Dean Lewis, Inka O'Hanrahan, Patricia Plante, Sister Mary Joel Read, Charlotte Roe, Alice Rossi, Vera Schletzer, Edna Schwartz and Herbert White. NOW was incorporated officially in Washington, D.C. on February 10, 1967, after finalization of its National Constitution and By-Laws by an appointed committee. The watch word was "action" as NOW waged war on all aspects of sex discrimination. Task forces were set up to deal with the problems of women in employment, education, religion, poverty, law, politics and their image in the media. Committees were also organized to handle finance, membership, public relations, legislation and legal activities. Somehow, without one paid staff member and no budget, NOW started raising the consciousness of the nation. Closet feminists began to expound their beliefs in public and NOW chapters emerged all over the country. By the time NOW held its second National Conference in Washington, D.C, in November, 1967, membership had risen to 1200. That was the year NOW startled the media and lost some members by declaring its support for repeal of all abortion laws and passage of the Equal Rights Amendment. Today, of course, the Equal Rights Amendment is supported by such old-line organizations as the League of Women Voters, the Girl Scouts and the Y. W. C. A. Even more significantly, Congressman Emanuel Cellers, arch foe of the ERA for 50 years, was defeated for office in 1972 by a woman. He partially blamed—or credited—the women's movement for his defeat.
File Name uhlib_1996_007_b002_f017_009.jpg