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People's Platform Newsletter, No. 12
File 001
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People's Platform Newsletter, No. 12 - File 001. September 1977. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 23, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1996_007/item/34/show/32.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1977). People's Platform Newsletter, No. 12 - File 001. Selections from the Marjorie Randal National Women’s Conference Collection. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1996_007/item/34/show/32

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

People's Platform Newsletter, No. 12 - File 001, September 1977, Selections from the Marjorie Randal National Women’s Conference Collection, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 23, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1996_007/item/34/show/32.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title People's Platform Newsletter, No. 12
Publisher Massachusetts Social and Economic Opportunity Council
Date September 1977
Language eng
Subject
  • Feminism
  • Women's rights
  • National Women's Conference
Place
  • Boston, Massachusetts
Genre
  • newsletters
Type
  • Text
Identifier ID 1996-007, Box 1, Folder 13
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Carey C. Shuart Women’s Research Collection
  • Marjorie Randal National Women's Conference Collection
Donor Randal, Marjorie
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript PUBLISHED BY THE MASSACHUSETTS SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY COL'XCIL TEL. 727-4089SEPTl!WlEFU977 CARTER'S WELFARE PLAN=LOW WAGES rs 7, P WANTEP/ TAKE YOUR. picic i * Xresident Carter's proposals to change the Welfare system are as far-reaching as his press releases promised. But the man who campaigned on compassion, and who won election because the votes of Black people and organized labor swung key electoral states, offers a welfare reform that is in spirit much like workfare. JOBS FOR SOME WORK FOR ALL The problem facing the Government in redesigning welfare is that any program that really met human needs would compete with the millions of jobs that pay wages that don't meet human needs. If Carter chose to offer liberal cash benefits to people capable of working, many sectors of the U.S. economy could not offer similar wages and still turn a profit or, for that matter, exist. OVERVIEW The Carter proposal adopts a combined compulsory work and cash benefit approach. Although it''cov- vers" all people regardless of age or family make-up, it treats different categories of people unequally, giving more or less cash benefits, financial incentives to work, or access to public service employment slots, according to category. The major distinction in treatment is the separation of those "expected to work" and those "not expected to work". Specifically, those "expected to work" are single individuals, married couples with no children, one parent of a two-parent household, and single parents whose youngest child is age fourteen or older. Those "not expected to work" are the aged (sixty-five or over), the blind, and disabled, and single parents of children under the age of six. Single parents with children between the ages of six and fourteen are "expected to work" part time if day #*~ ~* care is available. "Expected to work" translates: an adult offered a job who refuses it will lost his or her benefits. In all probability, State Employment Security Departments will have two months to match recipients with any existing jobs that can be found. If no job can be found, the recipient is supposed to be offered a Public Service Employment (PSE) slot. People who aren't classified as expected to work, such as single parents, elderly, or handicapped persons, will be lowest priority for Public Employment. MONEY The basic grant level for a family of two adults and two children is $2300. For single-parent families, the basic grant is $1100 for two people. If the adult who is expected to work cannot be placed in an existing job or PSE slot, the grant is increased by $1900. However, during the job search period and during employment, the basis on which the grant is calculated is $2300. This is the number to use when figuring out how much wages from a job reduce welfare benefits. For two-parent families of various sizes, add $600.00 per child. In addition, people working in regular jobs will be eligible for an "earned income" credit on their federal income taxes of about 7% of their wages. People who work in PSE won't get the tax break. When a person accepts a job, the Carter plan would allow them to keep much more of their wages than current welfare allows. The worker in two-parent families can keep the first $3800 in wages entirely and then have the family's benefits reduced by 50 cents for every dollar of earnings above $3800. People not expected to work who do work will find their welfare check cut by 50% of their entire earnings. Wages inPublic Service slots wiU be the minimum wage. The average wage in CETA jobs has been $3.60 an hour. The present minimum wage is $2.35 an hour and is expected to be increased to $2.65 this year. The difference between the average CETA job and a PSE will thus be about $2000 a year in wages. Carter originally planned to discourage reliance on PSE by reducing the welfare benefit by 50% of earnings above $1900 for PSE workers, as compared to $3800 for regular workers, but that provision has been dropped from the Administration's latest YOa AVAIL A»i.6 » in T**' \VSs "'/,'illM t — £\V< 'SLUni, 'ilium ^7/ announcements. All in all, a family of four with one PSE worker will have total gross income of $6050. JOB CREATION OR WAGE DEFLATION Carter plans to create one million PSE slots and 400,000 training slots (which will pay $1.95 an hour). This will be about double the number of slots that existed under CETA, which will be phased out. In addition to creating an administrative headache for the former CETA administrators, the shift of public service workers from prevailing wage CETA jobs to minimum wage PSE slots should have a big impact on all wages. While the Carter plan is based on getting unemployment down to below 6%, it does nothing in itself to increase the supply of real jobs. With each PSE paying $2000 a year less than CETA, the total difference in income to the poor for the one million work slots would amount to $2 billion each year. Currently (8-18) all the types of work being talked about for PSEs come under existing civil service job titles. Thus, major questions are developing over both the effect on wages throughout the economy and the potential for displacement of regular government employees. There are many other parts of Carter's plan that require careful scrutiny, such as the effect on single people or the elderly, the end of food stamps, whether current needs or past needs will determine eligibility and level of benefits, filing units, and administration. To find out more about Carter's plan and what you can do about it, call Sue Ochs or Barbara Lybarger at 617-482-0890, or Mary Geddes at 617-625-6000 ext. 191. J.B. FOLLOW-UP: MEDICAID FUNDS AND ABORTION Will women on medicaid have the right to a safe clinical abortion through the medicaid program, or will they have to resort to self induced abortions and quack doctors? This was the major question addressed at the public hearing held on the infamous Doyle-Flynn bill. Advocates of abortion rights, including Mass. Citizens for Choice and the Abortion Action Coalition, jammed Gardner Auditorium, while many more raUied outside of the State House. Moving and realistic testimony was presented to the committee by individuals, doctors, social workers, and officials from the state administration. Ms. Eileen Bailey a mother of two children on AFDC appeared at the hearing to speak against the bill. "The upper class legislators of this state are imposing their own supposed morals on poor people in the form of legislation such as this", she said of the Doyle-Flynn bill. "But this legislation will not achieve an end to abortion or to the problem of unwanted pregnancies, abused children, and underfed, undernourished children whose mothers cannot afford to clothe and feed them. What it will do is hypocritically allow those same 'moral' people, who can afford to pay for abortions, that privilege while denying poor women like me the freedom to exercise my constitutional right to choose whether or not to bear a child". continued on back page
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