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"Guest Viewpoint: The real heros"
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Randal, Marjorie. "Guest Viewpoint: The real heros" - File 001. 1974. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1996_007/item/1599/show/1597.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Randal, Marjorie. (1974). "Guest Viewpoint: The real heros" - File 001. Selections from the Marjorie Randal National Women’s Conference Collection. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1996_007/item/1599/show/1597

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Randal, Marjorie, "Guest Viewpoint: The real heros" - File 001, 1974, Selections from the Marjorie Randal National Women’s Conference Collection, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1996_007/item/1599/show/1597.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title "Guest Viewpoint: The real heros"
Creator
  • Randal, Marjorie
Date 1974
Language eng
Description This article was featured in the Clear Lake Citizen, January 27, 1974.
Subject
  • Feminism
  • Women's rights
  • National Women's Conference
Place
  • Clear Lake Shores, Texas
Genre
  • articles
Type
  • Text
Identifier ID 1996-007, Box 2, Folder 17
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Carey C. Shuart Women’s Research Collection
  • Marjorie Randal National Women's Conference Collection
Donor Randal, Marjorie
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript ■■■■■■■HHi puBMS>Ilq „ , uinuoa^Hi SMI oa a,^^ ^L«c-Ji4\j4iv-t;j-rf/\t:ij.i iu»,/»_..«.. .—^ • • Gz/e$J Viewpoint The real heros THE CLEAR LAKE NEWS CITIZEN, Sunday, January 27, 1974, Page 7 BY MARGE RANDAL "Her world is her husband, her family, her children, and her home. But where would the greater world be if no one cared to tend the smaller world? We do not find it right when the woman presses into the world of the man. The man upholds the nation as the woman upholds the family. The equal rights of woman consist in the fact that in the realm of life determined by her nature she experience the high esteem that is her due." The above is a quote from Adolf Hitler in 1934. At that time the Nazi government was planning near-total mobilization of able- bodied men for war. Clearly, many people would also be needed to work in factories arid elsewhere. And so women had somehow to be tricked into maintaining the homes of Germany (without pay), even while being forced by law into the market for cheap labor. There are certain parallels between this historical situation and that to be found in this country today. Women still maintain homes without pay (some of them write to Ann Landers about stealing the grocery money from their husbands* pockets at night), and they are still the largest component of the cheap labor pool in our country. The. psychological and verbal trickery aimed at women is still with us, t6o. Men know that the comfortable complacency of their lives is threatened, now that technology has opened the wider world to women at last. Even in Nazi Germany it was not fashionable to claim intellectual or moral superiority for men. (Indeed, it is always vitally necessary to leave the real basis of male power—physical strength—unnamed.) And so we have everywhere numerous vague appeals to glorious femininity, to beauty, to "la difference*' and similar irrelevancies. At the January meeting of the Clear Lake Personnel Association, a man who was watching the civil rights action of N' .O.W. members was overheard to say "My wife is too busy at home to do things like this.*' Not a word about the justice of N.O.W.'s demands for equal opportunity for women, but only the implication that it is somehow indecent for women to demand their rights. The best way to keep women down has become to ignore and belittle them. Contempt is coming out into the open at last. But a lot of people, including some men, find contempt for the weak an unappealing motive. Women are startled and appalled to see contempt at the root of some men's behavior toward them, particularly when the contempt is for the women's being exploited, while the women think they are being "good." And men are repelled to see the contempt of other men toward women whom they themselves respect. Many of us grow tired of roles as exploiter and victim. We would like to be allowed to live as free and generous human beings. Events in this country in the last two or three years suggest that many men now join women in the belief that a more humane world would result from granting women a full share in the decisions which affect all our lives. Because these men know that economics independence for women is a necessary pre condition to their equal participation, the men are willing to grant women this economic independence. Such men deserve our honor and respect far more than any heroes of the football field, space program or even medical research. Only men who will join the cause of women can now claim to advance the cause of all humanity-our other heroes are still too involved with the preservation of male advantage. Marjorie Randal is a doctoral candidate in Anthropology at the University of Texas. Ms. Randal resides in Clear Lake City with her daughters Dalerie and Camilla both students at Gear Lake High School. She serves as Vice-President for the Bay Area Chapter of the National Organization for Women and as first vice-president of the American Association of University Women (AAUW). * • • • —
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