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Boston in 1980
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The Committee for Boston in 1980. Boston in 1980 - Page 2. August 29, 1980 - September 1, 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 22, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/14/show/11.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Committee for Boston in 1980. (August 29, 1980 - September 1, 1980). Boston in 1980 - Page 2. Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/14/show/11

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Committee for Boston in 1980, Boston in 1980 - Page 2, August 29, 1980 - September 1, 1980, Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 22, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1984_003/item/14/show/11.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Boston in 1980
Creator (Local)
  • The Committee for Boston in 1980
Date August 29, 1980 - September 1, 1980
Description A newsletter by the committee for Boston in 1980, regarding their bid to hold the 1980 Eastern Zone Worldcon in Boston.
Donor Fritz Leiber; Justin Leiber
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Science fiction, American
  • Fantasy fiction, American
Subject.Topical (TGM-1)
  • Meetings
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Leiber, Fritz, 1910-1992
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Worldcon
  • The Committee for Boston in 1980
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Boston, Massachusetts
Genre (AAT)
  • fliers (printed matter)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1984-003, Box 57, Folder 39
Original Collection Fritz Leiber Papers
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=281
Digital Collection Fritz Leiber Science Fiction & Fantasy Convention Flyers & Programs
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/1984_003
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name uhlib_1984_003_b057_f039_133_002.jpg
Transcript The HOTEL Our hotel is the Sheraton-Boston, the flagship hotel of the Sheraton chain. Since it hosted Noreascon, the 1971 Worldcon, it has been expanded to 1,430 guest rooms and 42,318 sq. ft. of function space, ranging from the 15,796 sq. ft. Grand Ballroom complex to many smaller modular rooms. Since Noreascon, the Sheraton- Boston has been the site of five Boskone regional science fiction conventions. Because of this past experience, we know that the hotel staff enjoys working with fans and is familiar with the needs of a science fiction convention. They know what a Worldcon is all about and are looking forward to hosting another one. The Sheraton-Boston offers all the usual amenities: air-conditioning, color TV, ice and soft drink machines on every guest room floor, room service, etc. In addition, they provide reduced rate parking, a year-round dome-covered swimming pool, and nine restaurants and lounges including an ice cream parlor which is open all night during cons. Although we expect that the Sheraton will provide enough sleeping rooms for all attendees, any overflow can easily be accommodated in the 1,300 additional sleeping rooms to be found in other hotels within a two-block radius. Getting There The hotel is in the Prudential Center in Boston's Back Bay area, and is convenient to all the usual forms of transportation. (Fans arriving on horseback or by space shuttle may have some What is a Worldcon? Once a year, thousands of science fiction fans gather at a World Science Fiction Convention where they get to know each other, meet the professionals in the field, hear talks and panel discussions, give out the Hugo awards, watch movies, wear costumes, buy books and art, and a hundred other things — but most of all, they have fun. In contrast to most regional science fiction conventions, which are run by local groups and are usually held in the same area each year, the World Science Fiction Convention changes its site each year so that fans everywhere will have a chance to participate. The rules governing the Worldcon specify that it will generally rotate through three North American zones (Western, Central, and Eastern), but that sites outside of North America are also eligible to bid for the Worldcon in any year. difficulty.) The Massachusetts Turnpike (1-90) passes under part of the Prudential Center and has an exit right there. The hotel provides reduced-rate parking in an underground garage; you can unload your car right next to the elevators that serve the guest room floors. Just a few blocks from the hotel is the Back Bay Railroad Station and the Greyhound and Trailways Bus Stations. Logan International Airport is just across the harbor from the city center and only three miles from the hotel. Limousines run between the hotel and the airport every half hour and the current fare is $2.50. There is also a convenient public transportation system that will get you from the airport to a subway stop by the hotel for only 50$. The Auditorium The Hynes Civic Auditorium connects directly to the Sheraton-Boston Hotel. You won't have to cross a street or walk through a tunnel — you can step directly into the Hynes from the hotel's convention floor. The Hynes has an auditorium that seats 5,161 people along with an additional 120,000 sq. ft. of exhibit space. It has 23 permanent or modular meeting rooms, plenty of utilities, and a floor loading capacity that would allow a huckster to have five tons of books at his table. Both the Hynes and the Sheraton have convenient off-street loading docks for hucksters and exhibitors, and one of the Hynes elevators, with a 48' by 14' 8" platform, would accommodate the biggest elevator party ever. Near The Hotel The Sheraton-Boston Hotel and the Hynes Auditorium are located in the Prudential Center — a modern complex of stores, offices, and apartments with its own underground parking garage. The Pru also contains a 24- hour supermarket, a liquor store, branches of Brentano's Book Store, Saks Fifth Avenue, and Lord & Taylor, twenty-two other stores, a 50-story- high observation deck, and an excellent multi-media show called "Where's Bos- tonn?". On Boylston Street, which borders the Pru, you will find lots of eating places ranging from Jewish delis to Chinese cafeterias to creperies — plus book stores, movie theatres, camera stores, the Jazz Workshop, and the Institute for Contemporary Art. Boylston Street is the axis of Boston's Back Bay, with its elegant Newbury Street shops, art galleries, fine restaurants (like the Cafe Budapest, The Hermitage, and Casa Romero), the Boston Public Library, Trinity Church, the Christian Science Mother Church, Symphony Hall, the YMCA, and the Back Bay Railroad Station. BOSTON Boston, founded in 1630, has preserved many of its older buildings and is a fine city just to walk around in. A 25$ subway ride will get you to most parts of town (unless perhaps your name is Charlie) and there's a subway entrance right by the hotel. If you're interested in historic sites, you can walk the Freedom Trail, which takes you to places like the Old North Church, the Paul Revere House, the old and new State Houses, Faneuil Hall, and the Granary and Copp's Hill Burial Grounds. For culture, pick up a copy of the weekly Real Paper, and check out the scores of listings each week of legitimate, repertory, and college theatre, concerts, lectures, poetry readings, and other events. Or visit one of the many museums — the Museum of Fine Arts, the Museum of Science, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. Harvard University, just a short subway ride across the Charles River in Cambridge, operates three museums just by itself. The same short subway ride will get you to Cambridge's Science Fantasy Book Store and the Million Year Picnic for comics. Bookstores abound in the Boston/Cambridge area, and there are many long-established used book stores such as George Gloss's Brattle Book Shop. In addition to Newbury Street already mentioned, shopping opportunities include downtown Boston's department stores and Filene's Basement (scene of carnage, death, and super bargains), the Charles Street antique shops, and the newly-renovated Quincy Market near Faneuil Hall (where the Walrus and the Carpenter serves the freshest oysters in town). Just beyond the Quincy Market is the un-renovated Haymarket, where meat markets and pushcart produce vendors are thronged every Friday and Saturday. The market area also contains the famous Durgin-Park restaurant, which offers huge portions of plain New England food served family-style by absolutely unbelievable waitresses. Nearby is the North end, a very ethnic Italian neighborhood with many fine restaurants. And don't forget Chinatown! The waterfront is another interesting area with an excellent Aquarium, a replica of the Boston Tea Party ship, the real U.S.S. Constitution, and lots of old wharfs to explore. You can take a harbor cruise that stops at George's Island, a state park with a Revolutionary War fort. If you like parks, you could visit the Boston Common, ride the Swan Boats in the Public Gardens, watch the sailboats from the Charles River Esplanade, or venture further to the Fenway, where Boston- ians have been farming in community 'Victory" gardens since World War II. Boston has an incredible array of restaurants — from excellent seafood places (hint: the freshest seafood is found at the rants — like Fish Pier), to; — Italian, CI Hungarian — ean. And tho icated by th elegant loun pubs. The cui 18 and drinks although pack then. Enjoy, e New Engla If you ha\ Boston before are many ne plore. To th Gloucester are and summer Salem you car Gables and th west, Concorc Minute Man ] the Old Nort and the Emeri re-creations o life are Old Sti central Mass; Plantation jus Boston. If a some your disposal, vacation area: Cod National Martha's Vir Acadia Natioi Maine coast, Hampshire, t Vermont, and chusetts. We hope } visit some of when you con The COMI Chairman active in fan worked on Bo Boskone 1. In '. editor of the IV Twilight Zine man of Bosko: Noreascon in 1975 she ran th transformed i nings into the east coast art fannish projec ing The Noreai life, Leslie is a at MIT's Line numerous ho back riding, \ and eating goc Secretary in fandom sine moderately ac is in fourapas, can afford. He through 14, w, two, and is als