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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
File 063
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 063. 1956-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/692.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-12). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 063. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/692

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 063, 1956-12, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/692.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date December 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 063
Transcript Brownell Interview (Continued from page 54) I Von did think that there was some- ping wrong." "Well, you are entitled tn express 'vour personal opinion on that," granted Mr. Brownell, "but I believe that the facts will show, as I say, th.it when the situation became apparent quick action was taken. With that we come light back tei the- basic peiint. that — by and large, anel in the- broad view — the Administration lias conducted one of the most clean and honorable administrations that we have ever seen in this country." "Mr. Attorney-General," interposed Mr. Sylvester, "not to press this point p" but, when a man who is Secretary of the Air Force resigns under pressure, vein don't really do that in a Strong position, do yon? When your honesty and your good moral sense is charged, yon don't e'nit under fire if Von are really in the clear, de) von? Really?" "Well, he said, and 1 certainly believe him," Mr. Brownell insisted, "that he felt that he had made a mistake in judgment, and was then-fore retiring." | A Changed Tune "Let's turn to the Dixon-Yates thing.'' prefaced Mr. Sylvester. "Why Was it that a year ago the President Was able to say that he considered the role of Mr. Wenzel, who represented both Dixon-Yates on the one hand and the government on the other, when asked at his press conference, ancl I '■note him, 'perfectly proper'? Now, on the same basis, with no new facts developed, a year later your department is saying that not only was it not proper, but it was a violation of criminal laws of the United States." Mr. Brownell expressed the opinion that new facts hael come out in the Intervening time which indicated that a conflict of interest existed. "You mean that you all caught on to them," corrected Mr. Sylvester, "for it had been shown before then, as well as printed, what the conflict of interest was." "That is not my recollection," Mr. Brownell stated unequivocally. There was some amusement at Mr. Sylvester's succeeding statement that he could understand that the Attorney-General might not recollect this. "Mr. Brownell, on that particular point tlie testimony had been given before the Senate Committee prior to the time the question was asked of the President," reminded Mr. Mollenhoff, "and apparently he had not been informed of the testimony at this stage. Apparently be hael been informed that Mr. Wenzel had absolutely nothing to do with Dixon-Yates, and so stated. Now, who misinformed him? You've looked into this, haven't you?" Mr. Brownell recalled only the part the Department of Justice took in this matter. President's Full Support "After the testimony was taken and the full facts came out," he reported, "the transcript was sent to us in the orderly course of business to find out whether or not a violation of the law occurred. We thought that there was a conflict of interest, and, as you know, we took a very vigorous action. "I know," he added, "that our action has had the President's full support all the way through." "You felt the Administration was wrong in initial decisions in this case?" Mr. Mollenhoff had again picked up a loose thread ancl attempted, by pulling it, to unravel the snarled skein. "Well, that doesn't follow," denied the Attorney-General. "What happened on this 'conflict of interest' matter, and I think we should get this clear, was that when the facts came out — they were not known before, but when thev came out — as I say, we took vit\ prompt and vigorous action to see- to it that the courts of law had the- opportunity to settle whether any violation of the law had occurred." "Senator Kefauver, among others, has charged that there- was an actual attempt in the Administration to cover this up." staled Mr. Mollenhoff. "and he cited individuals like the head of the Security Exchange Commission and Sherman Adams, who were persons he saiel had knowledge of this ancl were covering up Mr. Wen/el's part. Have you looked into that?" "Oh, yes," Mr. Brownell replied matter-of-factly. "I think that his rather reckless charge's in this matter have- been completely disproved Indie fact that, as I say, as soon as these facts came out through an orderly in vestigation, the whole matter has been put up to the courts and will be decided there, which is the proper procedure." Mr. Sylvester reminded the Attorney-General that although the President had announced at a press conference that all facts would be made clear about this case, Mr. Wenzel's name was eliminated and not brought out. "It didn't come out from the White House, or from the Administration," he continued. "It was dug out, really. So when you say all facts were known, what do you mean?" "I mean," explained Mr. Brownell, "that we have presented this matter to the courts in great detail and, I think, with great forccfulness, and we have asked the courts to rule as to whether or not there was any violation of the law. They will do that in due course. "I think," he continued, "you will find in our briefs and in statements made to the court that every pertinent fact has been brought out and presented to them for decision." "Didn't you really, though," persisted Mr. Sylvester, "only act after the General Services Administration advised the government not to pay any money until this whole conflict of interest thing was tested in the courts?" Mr. Brownell indicated disagreement on this score. "That opinion came out a good many months before your department acted, did it not?" persisted Mr. Sylvester. "I suppose you mean General Accounting —" Mr. Sylvester agreed. "Well, we worked in cooperation with them on the whole program which led up to this lawsuit," replied Mr. Brownell. Executive Secrecy Questioned Mr. Mollenhoff opened a new line of questioning with the statement, "Mr. Brownell, at least four Democratic congressional committees that I know of off-hand have contended that vour administration has thrown a secrecy around the operations of the Executive branch of government to the point where they cannot get anything because it is all considered confidential. And they state that you are taking the position that the Executive branch can classify anything confidential, ls this a fact?" Mr. Brownell did not feel that this I'm is Forum News, December, 1956 Page 61
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