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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
File 056
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 056. 1956-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/685.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-12). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 056. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/685

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 056, 1956-12, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/685.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date December 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 056
Transcript f and transportation cases, indicating that the Supreme Court decision had his endorsement. "Would you have liked to have seen your party platform endorse the decision lather than merely accept it?" Mr. Sylvester queried. "I thought that we had a fine statement on the matter in our party platform," replied the Attorney-General. "Anyone who is interested in the development of a strong civil rights program and the elimination of discrimination would have to endorse the view that we took." A Weak Plank "Quite to the contrary," he added, "I felt that the Democratic party, in its platform, was very compromising ancl wishy-washy on this issue." Mr. Sylvester inquired regarding Mr. Brownell's differentiation between "endorsing" something, or "accepting" it. "I feel that when you hold public position," pointed out Mr. Brownell, "you subordinate your own personal views, and forget about them. Now, so far as I am concerned, even if I didn't agree with the decision, which I do, it would be my obligation as a public official to enforce all the laws of the federal government." Mr. Brownell added that the feeling was that some of their predecessors had picked and chosen the particular laws they wanted to enforce, whereas in this administration an endeavor had been made to "enforce all laws equally and against all persons equally." "On that particular point, Mr. Brownell," stated Mr. Mollenhoff, "during this political campaign Adlai Stevenson ancl Estes Kefauver have attacked the Administration as one of corruption and mismanagement. This in and of itself would be a charge against you, since you are the chief law enforcement official of the Administration. "f wonder if you could tell us," he inquired, "why you think you have done a good job against corruption?" Mr. Rrownell contrasted what he termed the present administration's "record of decent and honorable government" to "the scandal and corruption that existed in the Truman administration," and remarked that he would personally like to see Mr. Stevenson and Mr. Kefauver state their opinions of the scandals and corruption of the Tniman era. Page 54 "I think thev- .should have gone into it," he added, "if they expected their people to believe that they were speaking frankly on this subject. That should have been their first duty, since those things were their party's responsibility." Again Mr. Mollenhoff turned the coin, remarking, "In connection with the Dixon-Yates contract it is their contention that the Administration did not act until it was prodded by Congress and the Talbot case. "I wonder if you could tell us," he asked, "why it took the Administration much more than a year to find out about the conflicts of interest in the Dixon-Yates case and in the Talbot incident?" Mr. Rrownell stressed that that instance also should be looked at in the perspective. "What we want to do on a program of this sort," he insisted, "is to take the over-all picture. They pointed out two instances where I think you ought to say that thc Administration acted with care. In the over-all picture there has never been an administration in my time that is as clean and decent, and has had such effective law enforcement and high standards for personnel in the Executive branch of the government as the Eisenhower administration." Lest We Forget "I don't think that any particular incident should be brought up," Mr. Brownell added, "which would make us forget that, especially when we contrast it with the Truman administration where, as you know, in order to clean up the mess it was necessary to prosecute more than a hundred officials in the Internal Revenue department alone. The broad scale of corruption and mishandling that happened at that time has never been denounced by our opponents, although they had the responsibility for it." Mr. Mollhi-nhoff pointed out that in the 1952 campaign, President Eisenhower had stated generally that he would act quickly ancl neit wait for prodding from Congress, yet that Senator Gore had charged recently that this administration waited until it was prodded by congressional committees in these particular incidents. "You must remember of course that the Congress has a very different jurisdiction from the Executive branch in its investigatory powers," cautioned Mr. Rrownell. "The Executive branch moves in when there is evidence of a crime presented, or evidence of misconduct of any kind. In these two particular cases, the minute that any substantial question was raised, the minute that propriety was involved, very quick action was taken by the Executive branch." "You found there was no crime u> the Talbeit case?" asked Mr. Mollenhoff. "Oh, none at all!" I(, "You found that an impropriety existed?" pressed the newsman. "I don't know that anybody feels that there was," Mr. Brownell s.aid- Mr. Mollenhoff inquired regarding the Attorney-General's personal opinion on this case, which drew from Mr. Brownell the statement that he concurred with President Eisenhowers conclusion that Mr. Talbot had acted wisely under all the circumstances m resigning his office. The Frozen Medal "Mr. Talbot got a fine letter of commendation when he left," pointed out Mr. Mollenhoff, "and I think he also got a medal. This seemed to be a little reminiscent of what happened to t couple of Internal Revenue officii* under the Truman administration, wondered if you felt that Mr. Talbot had carried out his duties basically as he should have-, and that there was no real wrong?" "Oh, I think that to compare this with the Internal Revenue scandal would really be a great mistake, replied Mr. Brownell, disclaiming ^e element of scandal in the Talbot case- "So far as he was concerned, ne explained, "he decided that he ha" made a mistake in judgment and " resigned. That settled the matter." "Do you feel he was wrong, personally?" Mr. Mollenhoff persisted. "We never had anything to do •*»-* that case in the Justice Department, the Attorney-General pointed °ut' "There was never any allegation, eve by political opponents, of any vio' tion of the law having occurred, so * never took action on it." Mr. Mollenhoff was not satisfied- "Rut there seems to have been a hesitancy on the part of the Administr*-' 1^ tion," he insisted, "to do what I rather anticipated. I hael the feeling tna there was possibly something wrong* anel if there were that they woU-*J just frankly say it. That was what ^ have been trying to get you to do, (Continued <m page 81} FAcrrs Forum News, December, 1956
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