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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
File 050
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 050. 1956-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/679.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-12). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 050. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/679

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 050, 1956-12, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/679.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date December 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 050
Transcript "- tl massacre in their new film, 'The Boss,' shall stay in. The code people refuse the film a seal of approval unless it is cut out. "The Seltzers, egged on by a left- wing, anti-code, anti-Legion minority in Hollywood, argue that if it was okay to show gangsters killing each other with machine guns in 'The Big Combo,' filmed in the fall of 1954, it is okay now. "The argument," Mr. Mooring concludes, "is illogical. It was not okay in 1954. It is not okay now. 'The Big Combo' was among the crime films in the juvenile delinquency investigations. It illustrated just the type of movie against which the Senate Subcommittee warns the Hollywood film industry.'"' The vice-president and general manager of Television and Radio Hearst Division, Mr. D. L. Provost, reporting recently on television's role in combating juvenile delinquency, stated that in less than a decade the miracle of television had rushed to adulthood with such vigor that today it stands as a Goliath in the realm of mass communication. More and more, he stated, culture and information are replacing meaningless programs. Pointing to the political conventions, senatorial investigations, Peter Pan, the Sadler-Wells Ballet, operas, medical programs, ancl the presentation of Ricliard HI, among countless other programs of major stature, Mr. Provost stressed that with dramatic suddenness the network and local stations have upgraded their shows to provide a more adult diet for viewers. Acknowledging that ignorance fosters juvenile delinquency, he feels that television is embarked on a vital cru- sade to improve the minds of the people.10 TV Code Protects Needs of Children Most independent television stations subscribe to the National Association of Radio and Television Broadcasters, whose seal of good practice is from time to time flashed em their screens. The N'ARTB television code lays down a standard of practice for its member stations which requires that they police themselves. The preamble to this code stresses: Television and all who participate in it are jointly accountable to the American public for respect for the special needs of children, for community responsibility, for the acceptability of the program materials chosen, for decency and decorum in production, ancl for propriety in advertising. Page 48 Item after item of this code is designed to insure the practice of avoiding telecasts that would in any way demoralize viewers or foster such unfortunate evils as juvenile delinquency. Among many other requirements, profanity, obscenity, ancl vulgarity are forbidden; attacks on religion and religious faiths are not allowed; the administration eif illegal dmgs is not to be displayed; the- presentation of cruelty, greed, anel selfishness as worthy motivations is to be avoided; and criminality shall be presented as undesirable ancl unsympathetic.10 Activities Provided for Youth Constructive action in providing worthwhile activities for America's youth is also being taken by numerous organizations throughout the country. Instruction ancl leadership are being given by the Boys' Clubs of America, the Young Men's Christian Association, Young Women's Christian Association, 4-H Clubs, anel many others. JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT COMPANIES - "A Taste ot Free Enterprise" Outstanding service is being rendered to high-school youth through the Junior Achievement programs Sponsored by 1,700 business concerns throughout the country. Practical experience is afforded through the pint- size companies which these programs foster, which give teen-agers a foretaste of the soaring spirit of free enterprise. Groups are sponsored by community business firms, who assign production, sales, and accounting advisers to assist them. When the youngsters have decided what product or service they are going to develop and sell, working capital is raised by the sale of shares at 50 cents each to relatives and friends. Each miniature enterprise is in operation only about thirty weeks, ancl is liquidated at the end of the school year. During their period of operation, company members are paid employees, keeping books ancl carrying out their specific \\ lial sst- has*- ;i right to i-xpi-s-l of the Aine-rie-an boy is that tie shall turn out to he a good American man. The boy ran besst beesome :i -rood man by bs-ing a good boy — not a goody-goody boy, but .ju-t a plain good hoy. ... In life, a- In a football game, tbe pi-im-iple to follow is: Hit the line hard; elon*t foul and ihm'l shirk, but hit the line bard. — TlIKODOBK ROOSEVELT duties in an effort to achieve success, anel earn a profit for themselves and stockholders at the end of the year. Junior Achievement comp.-inies fail in about the- same- proportion as U. p. business in general, and, just as M U. S. business in general, seime achieve phenomenal success. Most JA companies which have been moderately successful are able to pay elividends of 5 to 10 per cent on stockholders investments, and some have even paid as high as 50 per cent. The youngsters working in Junior Achievement programs learn to appreciate the profit system as the best means ol creating things people need.11 BOYS' CLUBS OF AMERICA - "Character Builders of Urban Youth" The Bens' Clubs of America, which this year celebrates its 50th anniversary as a national organization, has clone an outstanding job in channeling youthful energy into wholesome habit patterns anil laving the- groundwork for healthy, law-abiding lives. Although only a small percentage of "ie more than 400,000 youngsters who participate in Boys' Club activities are problem, eases, successful salvage jobs on boys who have started off on the wrong foot" are- taking place each day among tbe more (ban 425 Boys Clubs in the United States. "Character is some-thing that is caught, not taught," says Arthur Burger, executive director of the Boys Clubs of Boston. "If a boy doesnt catch it from bis parents, it nibs on on him from other beiys and cluo leaders." The "bad" boy is usually a neglected ben who is eagerly looking *or someone or some-thing he can admire anel copy. The- Boys' Clubs of America provide 111111 with just that.18 4-H CLUBS - "Head, Heart, Hands, Health," for Rural Youth While the Bins' Clubs are formj*- niainlv in congested, urban areas, tn rural and suburban areas, too, na,v, constructive programs lor youth. Cnie among these are tin- I II ( dubs, which claim more than 2,156,000 members i" (Continued on page 64' ""Senate Investigating Unit I'ibIieeIeIs (-rIt,ti. View," I.s William II. Mooring, The kdaoCe*** I.bIs 28, I9-;b. On The e.lE.E-sli '■ Ibs 11. I.. Provost, Cone"*" seeee,.;/ Hr-cord, July 28. 1956, p. A5918. a6 ""TIb.-sb- Youngsters \a- in Business," ,lV e:iark. Reader's Digest, Sept., 1955. „ .„ •"400,000 Boy! tsre Members -.1 the C:lsib, "' William I.. White, Read, , i Digt tt, I - b , 1856. Facts Forum News, December, 195"
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