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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
File 045
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 045. 1956-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/674.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-12). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 045. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/674

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 045, 1956-12, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/674.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date December 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 045
Transcript *%, could, of course, be expected to be lowered following the closing date of a war. Asked by Mr. Lucas if the figures he had quoted were a scaling-down of the pension plan presented in the last Congress, and which he now described as dead, Mr. Daniel replied that this bill would contain just about the Mime provisions as were contained in the bill presented last year, and that there was reason to hope that it might go through the next Congress. "We vvill use every effort to promote this legislation," he stated, explaining that this was a mandate of the .National Convention. "Cost of living" Increase "Well, if it does fail, Mr. Daniel," Inquired Mr. Lucas, "would you be willing to sit down with some group — say. the House Veterans' Committee — anel work out a general revision of existing legislation so that disabled veterans get benefits, for instance, in line with the increased cost of living?" "Actually, that's what this amounts to, Mr. Lucas. It is a cost eif living increase," replied Mr. Daniel. "To answer your question, though, I couldn't comment on that because I Would have no power to act beyond my present administration. The American Legion takes the position that the overwhelming majority of men who entered upon military service .suffered in some way. Most hael not only physical, but economic disabilities. Our equalization law is designed to compensate those men in some small way for the loss that they suffered, ancl is in keeping with our long-standing traditions of fairness anel equity." "Commander Daniel," inserted Mr. Prina, "leaving the domestic front, I believe the Legion advocated at its recent convention that all steps should be taken tn assure the passage of vessels of all nations through the Sue/ Canal. Now, does that resolution, or the advocacy of that resolution, extend to the use of armed convoys, or to War':"" "Let me first say that the event that led up to the- controversy over the Suez Canal, in my judgment, was a step in the right direction taken by inn- State Department when the) refused aid in the building of tbe Aswan Dam," explained Mr. Daniel. "Very frankly, I would not like to answer that question because of the negotiations that are now going on in an attempt to settle tin- controversy. 1 would, however, say this: that our convention did go on record as proposing that we use every step or effort available to us to keep the ships of all nations moving through that international waterway. I don't think that I have- enough facts at my disposal to say more than that." "Generally speaking, though," pursued Mr. Prina, "do you think that the U. S. has been aggressive enough in handling President Nasser, who has shown signs of being quite a 'one man show' in that section of the world?" "I certainly think, as I said before, that the steps that have been taken have been in the right direction," reiterated Mr. Daniel. "I realize that we have in Mr. Nasser a probable miniature of Hitler, ancl it seems to me that we are going to have to apply whatever pressure is necessary to stop him in his tracks now before we have a repetition of World War II." Should Nasser Control Suez? Mr. Prina asked whether Mr. Daniel would advocate that President Nasser be allowed tei set the tolls, to direct traffic ancl pilots, and so forth, or whether he felt that the international body ought to insist on this jurisdiction. Mr. Daniel, however, did not feel qualified to comment upon these points, again pointing to his lack of know ledge of current negotiations. Mr. Lucas, changing the subject under discussion, mentioned that Senator Ellender of Louisiana, a prominent member of the United States Senate, had recently denounced three of our allies, — South Viet Nam, Nationalist China, ancl South Korea — as bloodsuckers, alter a visit to Europe where, as Mr. Lucas put it "he had some very kind things to say about Mr. Khrushchev and Company." "I notice," Mr. Lucas added, "that he is being picketed in Seoul. Would von care to comment on that?" "I certainly do not care to question the motives eif Senator Ellender," replied Mr. Daniel. "We- in the American Legion have always looked upon the nations that he has condemned as friendly allies of the I'.S.A. Based on what I know, ancl what we have been told in our briefings. I believe that they are friends of the Unite-el States." Mr. Lucas then asked if Mr. Daniel would outline the position of the American Legion with regard to foreign military and economic aid programs. Coincidentally, Mr. Daniel was prepared to comment upon this subject by quoting the very newsman by whom he was being questioned. Mr. Daniel pointed out that Mr. Lucas had just returned from the Far East when this statement was made, which specifically referred to India. "You said, sir, in that statement," he pointed out, "that we had spent 'X' number of dollars in an attempt to stabilize the economy of India, and we found the strange spectacle of Nehru and Mennon flying all over the world — I believe you said 'perhaps at our expense' — preaching a strange type of neutrality, one that recognized all the virtues of communism and none of its faults, and all the faults of capitalism and none of its virtues. "Your statement," Mr. Daniel commented, "strikes me very forcefully, and also ties in with the position of the American Legion. 1 may say to you, sir, that we were strong advocates of the Marshal] Plan. Many of our members had just returned from the war-torn areas of the world, and they recognized a great need for the rehabilitation of those countries. We were led to believe at that time that this program would cost approximately $17 billion, and would be extended far beyond that, and that we have spent now in excess of $60 billion in these programs. The Tito-talitarian Affair "Another specific example I'd like to bring out, in line with your statement regarding India, is the case of Burma," he continued. "There we spent $31 million in an attempt to democratize that country. And what happened? The day we spent the last dollar of that money, they asked the United Nations to brand us as aggressors in Korea. However, the most blatant example, of course, is that of Yugoslavia. Here we ate spending $35 billion a year in our defense program in an attempt to stop communism in Soviet Russia. At the Ssime time, we spend a billion dollars, in addition to providing other sinews of war (including 380 jet planes, I believe), promoting the same type of government in Yugoslavia. Well now, to me that just doesn't make sense, because in my opinion a Communist is a Communist, whether he lives in Belgrade, in Moscow, or whether he lives in Danville, Virginia, or Washington, D. C." Mr. Prina pointed out that the Eisenhower Administration takes the Pacts Forum News, December. 1956 Page 43
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