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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
File 044
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 044. 1956-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/673.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-12). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 044. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/673

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 044, 1956-12, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/673.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date December 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 044
Transcript B. I •I 1 posed when this tax was first introduced) is distinctly everybody's concern anel everybody's business. Let John Doe Handle His Purse Strings What is needed is dynamic bipartisan leadership in a tax reduction program that will make clear the folly of paving out of one pocket so-called benefits and "free" services which are supposed to put something in the other. The proposition should be- hammered home that government does not ancl by its very nature cannot create wealth. It can only redistribute existing wealth anel se-11 to people, at a steep and growing price in taxes, benefits which individuals could well pro- viele- for themselves, if they wanted, and if they were not required to carry such a heavy load of taxation. The United States has been more resistant to socialism, presented under a Socialist label, than most other countries. During decades of political activity the American Socialist party was only able to elect two representatives to Congress. Ancl this was a long time ago. Hut, while socialism has been refused admission at the front door, it has been sneaking in through the back door and through unguarded win- eleiws. Consider the implications of the following provisions of existing financial legislation: The federal government, through the corporation income tax, takes 52 per cent of the profits of business firms. Then it taxes what is left of these profits a second time, when they are paid out in dividends. In the case eif taxpayers in the higher income brackets this means that the government, without assuming any of the risks of business operation, establishes a prior lien on 90 per cent or more of the- profits. And there are demagogues ignorant anel unscrupulous enough to allege that this government, which through income, inheritance, gift, and corporation income taxes annihilates private wealth on a gigantic scale, is "a rich man's government"! The Mills of the Cods History shows by many examples that excessive taxation, the reckless use of the power to destroy, as it has been so aptly called, is an important factor in the decline and fall of civilizations. The following citation from George Finlay's solid historical work, Page 42 Greece Under the Romans, is one of many that might be used to illustrate this point: At last the whole wealth of the empire was drawn into the imperial treasury; fruit tress were cut down and free men were sold to pay taxes; vineyards' were rooted out and buildings were destroyed0 to escape taxation. .#. . The increase of the public burdens*proceeded so far that every year brought with it a failure in the t;i\s-s of some province, anel consequently the confiscation of the private property of the wealthiest citizens of the insolvent district, until at last all the rich proprietors were ruined, anel the law (of collective responsibility for the payment of taxes) became nugatory. Small wonder that there was little will to resist the- barbarian invasions in the West or the Moslem sweep in the East. The sucking up of power, initiative, and national we-alth into a bureaucratic centralized apparatus of government is one of the most unmistakable- eif historical danger signals. For the last quarter of a century ancl more this signal has be-e-n flashed with increasing urgency to the American people. Now the time has come to reverse the fatal trend toward centralization, to curb the power to destroy which is implicit in a form of tax that makes a mockery of the right of private- property anil gives the State an e-laslie and indefinitely extensible claim on the fruits of the- labor of its citizens. A decisive repudiation of a type of taxation that stifles initiative and tends slowly but surely to transform formerly free men into wards anel serfs of the State would resound through the land with the invigorating effect of a new Declaration of Independence. EN" °Iee this country and, ti) .1 larger e-xIe-ebI. bee "rf^ Britain, tliis destruction .,t sp.iE-iiBiEs homes* svhicb E'-II I 111- BEE-|Bt ll|E IIIBiIe-E existing luirddES of ta*^j is already bib hill sssiny. In tliis ebebeI EBttEE-r ssBE-h sOCia .EBBeI BE BElllBEIliE- EBB,lit,-IS Hlitaill BBffsTS 11 pittvUrl* ° se Ii.eI iti.is be i s])e'e Ie-eI bbe this cOEiBBtry after a dsscao sir two if present trends eer- not reversed. Its "Does Hie- Slats- Build Homes?" IIebsse-H Kirk, in his lata' h.BEik. Beyond thi- Dreams nl Avarice, niss-s a vivid description be! Use- disappearance t>t Bsitish homes ssliiE-li see-be- centers <>e iseIube. and community t****9-. This article appeared in Ihr Freeman, September, 1956, issue-. Looking Ahead With the American Legion (Continued from page 17) could that be his motivation, since, having had only sixty-seven days in service, he is not eligible for any veterans' benefit on the statute books at present, and would certainly not promote anything that would make him eligible for such benefits. Mr. Lucas asked if Mr. Daniel planned to carry on the policies of J. Addington Wagner, his predecessor in office. "Yes, in general," Mr. Daniel replied. "Yeiu realize, of course, Mr. Lucas, that the marching orders of a national commander are provided by the National Convention. And also, of course, by the National Executive Committee. These- are the- governing bodies of the organization. "Of course," he added, "I will unquestionably have priority projects." "Specifically, will your pension program have the priority that it had under Commander Wagner?" inquired Mr. Lucas. Asked to clarify his reference, Mr. Lucas mentioned the purported expenditure by the- Legion of as much as $100 thousand in its campaign to enact pension legislation. This plan which was presented in the last Con gress, he outlined, had been described variously as the $77 billion to the $140 billion universal pension plan. "Well, of course, the American Legion has always be-e-n on record tt opposing ;i general pension for veterans," said Mr. Daniel. "That was voted down in our convention last year and again this year. You re-fe-r, <" course-, to Bill 7S,Sfi. That bill is no* dead. We do propose to ask for a limited liberalization of the present pension laws. It will amount to ab''ut 12 per cent over-all, anel the- best figure that we can arrive at will he approximately $325 million for the first year. "Now, that sounds like a lot of money, 1 know, to begin with, 'lC added, "but when you realize that the veterans' program in this nation Is costing in excess of $4 billion today- then you know- that it's a very sffla* amount by comparison, And I might say also that while the- budgets °> other governmental agencies have gone- up markedly in the past fe^ years, the budget lor tbe Veterans Administration has been cut in half '° the past six years." Mr. Daniel agreed that this budget Facts Forum News, December, 1956
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