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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
File 038
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 038. 1956-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/667.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-12). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 038. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/667

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 038, 1956-12, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/667.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date December 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 038
Transcript An Historic Precedent (Continued from page 9) t ': ments, namely, (1) a special educational committee for theological schools; (2) a department for international church affairs; (3) a business department; (4) a publication department; (5) a department of pensions. "The administration of the Russian Orthodox Church is handled according to the rules adopted by the Church. It is governed by the Patriarchate together with the Holy Synod consisting of six members. There are three permanent members, namely, the- Metropolitans of Kiev, Leningrad, ancl Moscow. The other members are diocesan bishops who take their turns. There are seventy-two dioceses which conform to the geographic State administrative districts. Each diocese has a bishop, who, in certain instances may be an archbishop or a metropolitan. Functions of Sobor "On the most important matters there is a 'Sobor' (convocation) of the bishops. In addition, the-re is a national Se)bor which alone has the right te> e-lfe-et changes in the Constitution of the Church. The National Sobor comprises all of the bishops, beside representatives of the clergy anel the laity. It elects the Patriarch. Patriarch Alexei was elected in 1945 on the death of Patriarch Se'rgei. "There is in the Soviet Union a great diversity of churches and religions. These include the Russian Orthodox, Moslems, Roman Catholics in Lithuania, Evangelical Lutherans in Latvia anel Estonia, the Union of Evangelical Christian-baptists, Ad- ventists, Methodists, Reformed, Old Believers, Armenians, ancl Buddhists. "Representatives of all these religious be)elie-s met in 1951 in Zagorsk. Notwithstanding the- variety o( religions represented, they all agreed in se-e-king peace. "The Russian Church pays homage to the other churches. It has received delegations from the- Dutch Church, several groups from England, a dele- gatiein from the- Church in Denmark, also from the- West German Evangelical Church, anel fre)rn the- Quakers in Britain. "In the Orthodox Church there is no centralize-el body for all of the Orthodox Churches in various countries. There are fourteen auto- Page 36 cephalous or autonomous Orthodox Churches. They have a common faith anel the canons which are accepted by all. There is a feeling of friendship between them. The Orthodox Church does not believe in proselytizing, as it wishes to avoid arousing the feeling of hatred between Christians." [Not included are statements made by representatives of the Armenian, Lutheran, and Baptist churches, which are similar in nature to statements eif the Orthodox Church.] The Peace and War Issue This question occasioned the me)st vigorous discussion; two sessions were devoted to it. At the first of these two Metropolitan Nicolai was the only Russian churchman present. The American deputation questioned the wisdom of this arrangement since there would be nine American churchmen on one side of the table anel only one Russian on the other. This arrangement, however, seemed te> be preferred by the Metropolitan. "The Russian churches," he said, "are ready to cooperate with any movement which can effectively work for peace. When the World Council of Churches issued its statement against atomic war, the Orthodox Church welce>med it. We have written to the World Council of Churches proposing that concrete arrangements . . . be made for a meeting with its representatives. In the United States, many Protestant clergy raise their voices against the atom bomb and for disarmament. We welcome such voices. The Russian Orthodox Church extends Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, center, president of the Notional Council of Churches, mokes a good-will presentation to Baltic clergymen in Moscow. The Lutheran Archbishops are Gustov Turs, left, of Latvia, and John Kiivit, of Estonia WIDE ssEElEl.n PHEJTO its welcome to all who work for peace." Dr. Van Kirk presented a paper on be-half e,l the- deputation. Seven points were emphasized: (1) peace is the by-product of truth, freedom, an" righteousness; (2) steadfast support for the United Nations; (3) interna- tiemal negotiation for the- easing of tensions between the Unite-el States anel the Soviet Union; (4) support of efforts for international control of atomic energy anel multilateral control of armaments through the United Nations; (5) support of programs of economic aid anel technical assistance, not as hostile- acts against the Soviet Union but as a humanitarian endeavor; (6) the- establishment and safeguarding of human rights and fundamental freedoms; (7) the goal of autonomy lor subject ami e-olonial peoples, Metropolitan Nicolai replied, saying he- appreciated the- spirit in which Dr. Van Kirk's paper hael been presented) ami he- would have il translated into Russian anil make copies available to the- Russian conferees for a subsequent discussion. * * -x At this point the- discussion turned to tin- question e>f the- relation of the churches in the- United States to the peace efforts of the- World Peace Council, in which Metropolitan Nicolai hail played so important a p-irt- The Metropolitan was remanded of the unjustified criticism that hael been levelcel against tin- American churches from the platform of the World Peace Council. One of the- American churchmen saiel that e-e-rtain of these misrepresentations hail been maele- by Met- ropolitan Nicolai himself. When the Facts Forum News, December, 1956 I
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