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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
File 033
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 033. 1956-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/662.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-12). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 033. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/662

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 033, 1956-12, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/662.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date December 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 033
Transcript bjectives, and has been repeatedly, itossly humiliated, into the bargain. The less dependence we place in raited Nations, Mr. Gilbert thinks, lie more advantaged we are, as a -ation. What about friendship and diplomatic relations between Communist tad non-Communist nations? Don't be 1 dupe, scoffs "Heptisax." "The road t> lasting peace is over the corpse of lie international Communist appa- Wus." As these few excerpts indicate, we lave here a robust book for red- Wooded readers. It sets down a stark record of the appalling mistakes which we have already made, yet leaves us with the deep conviction that America can, must, and will accept the truth, ancl go fonvard along paths of wisdom and rectitude. This is no time for patriots to sit at ease on the side-lines, letting the other fellow make all the decisions ancl do all the work. Khrushchev himself has described the struggle as "competitive coexistence." America, concludes the author, had better learn "to distinguish between a petting party under the moon ancl a challenge to a duel." end THE WHITE NIGHTS By Bon's Soleo/off The Devin-Adair Co., 23 E. 26th St., New '°rk 10, N. Y., 19S6, 294 pp., $3.75. Thrill-packed, adventure-crammed, is book lifts you right out of your *fmchair and deposits you in old St. ■"etersburg, the City of White Nights, •'here summer mists from the Neva ■tiver used to wrap the landscape in pearly dream-like cloud. Dr. Sokoloff, physician anel scientist "f international renown, now living in *lorida, writes brilliantly of his youth Jnd education in Russia, where he was Jorn in 1893. He recalls memories of ■Vorld War I, the fall of the Romanoff 'ynasty, the brief and vacillating Ker- ^sky government, its trend toward •ocialism, its capitulation before the -tirious onslaught of communism. At age fifteen, Boris, while in Switzerland on vacation, met Lenin; J"as unfavorably impressed when he teard the man explode: "Class war, ed between rich and poor, be- '■veen capitalists and workers, is the Moving force in the social progress of jftankind." Fortunately for Boris, he tad been well grounded by his be- •°ved history teacher, Chaskolsky, in democratic ideals and principles ^hidi were to guide him through life. "To a foreigner visiting Petrograd *-. October, 1917, the city gave the appearance of living a full, normal, .Animated existence. . . . But the calm l^as deceptive. A grave political crisis ■"as menacing . . . the newly-horn democratic state. . . . Lenin demanded . an energetic fight against the bourgeoisie,' meaning the Socialist '•berals and moderate Socialists. By ■took or crook the Bolsheviks had filtered into the various Soviets, particu- I^acts Forum News, December, 1956 larly the soviet of Petrograd, steadily ine leasing their influence. . . . There was a strong underlying trend of appeasement, and this was soon to become the source of tragedy for Russian democracy." Stirring events of January, 1918, marked the end of the All Russia Constituent Assembly, headed by earnest but unrealistic statesmen who forbade any armed demonstration against the Bolsheviks. "There was no publication in exist ence which was free to raise its voice against Soviet propaganda," laments the author — save The Soldier's Capote. This four-page sheet, edited and published by Sokoloff ancl two daring associates, was immensely popular during its life-span of three weeks. The people did not want communism. "One regiment would have been sufficient to throw the delicate balance of power in favor of democracy. This was admitted by many Communist leaders in private conversation." Lenin was fearfully biting his nails, shaking in his boots; daily he risked assassination. In fact, on several occasions he was shot at. Once, four bullets (out of five, fired by a girl, at close range) entered his body; he was with difficulty patched up at a hospital. One of those bullets is still in his embalmed remains in the mausoleum on Red Square (if it really is Lenin on display, not merely a wax figure). One girl is, however, not a regiment. The talk-talk-talk of statesmen in conference could not prevail against the crack-crack-crack of machine guns in action. Lenin forged ahead. "Democracy was at his mercy. . . . The fate of the left-wing Socialists was pathetic. Although admitted to the Soviet of People's Commissars, in which they received a few seats, they were mercilessly liquidated as soon as their usefulness as appeasers had ended." Young Dr. Sokoloff visited Pavlov's laboratory. Pavlov talked of "neurism." which assigns to the brain, and to the brain only, the seat of higher nervous activity, of man's mental processes, moods, and emotions — personality- being regarded as the end result of man's adaptation to the outside stimulus, or environment. Lenin called on Pavlov in October, 1919. Their conference "was the takeoff point for the Soviet government's gigantic project of controlling human behavior. It was actually a war on that Russian individualism of which we had been so proud in the past. Several of Pavlov's disciples were appointed as heads of institutions in other cities, where work was at once directed along the line of neurism, with financial support from thc Soviet goxernment. "Scientists, physiologists, and psychiatrists who disagreed, even slightly. xvith 'superneurism,' were denounced as 'enemies of communism' and 'bourgeois lackeys.'" Over and over again, the dissident Dr. Sokoloff escaped death by a hair's breadth, and, naturally, spent some time in prison. He says: "Paradoxically, I was in the midst of left-wingers. Out of twenty men in Cell 17, fourteen were men who only two years before had ardently promoted and defended communism. . . . All were filled with hatred for the Soviet government. They claimed they hael been betrayed, by Lenin and his comrades, in the most outrageous manner. " 'Without us,' they reiterated, 'the Communists would never have been able- to overthrow Kerenskv's government or disperse the Constituent Assembly. We believed them. We trusted their honesty, their integrity. their promises to adhere to democratic principles and respect freedom. We (Continued on page 63) Page 31
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