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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
File 027
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 027. 1956-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/656.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-12). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 027. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/656

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 027, 1956-12, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/656.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date December 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 027
Transcript all low-level attacks in mountainous terrain, without radar or oxygen, with only six hours' fuel. "We weren't told anything about the type of war we Were fighting," he said. "We had no iele>a why we were fighting in Korea, and we weren't told anything about the Communists. I had to become a prisoner of war after fifty missions, to realize why we had to fight them. "Despite all the lies and twisted facts the Beds told us in their indoctrination lectures, we still got a better all- around picture of the world situation from them than from our own people! What we found out from the Beds themselves proved to us that they were our all-out enemy and justified every bit of fighting we were doing. What a wonderful boost for morale it would have been if we could have learned that from our own side, instead of having to Wait until we were captured by the Reds to find out how rotten they were and how right we were." After many adventures in prison camp, "The Chinese began to indoctrinate us," Bob said. "They gave us Bed .magazines and papers and lectures. After a while, they came to me and suggested that I 'voluntarily' give a talk on 'the indiscriminate bombing of Korean villages.' What they wanted was a confession they could publicize. I refuse-el. "The next morning 1 refused again. They told me they Would send guards for me in a couple of hours, ancl that this would be it! Those next two hours were awful! I was less worried when the third hour passed without anyone coming to take me to those new, unknown horrors. Thex never came! I never regretted calling their bluff. "When they failed to show up, I lost a great deal of my fear. From then on I was able to get along much hitler. I refused to sign anything. If I had given ill on that one- point, 1 believe I would have- cracked through and through. I also learned to let nothing be taken from me Willingly." Bob didn't realize it, but he was paying the-m back in their own coin. Communists never gixe- a man anything until they have to. Indeed, this is a clue to their aggravating behavior in international relations. The Reds never concede a single point, no matter how trivial, until thex must, and have got everything they can in exchange. 8. David F. MacGhee. Major MacGhee, after release from prison camp, returned from Korea certain that the development of strong leadership qualities was the main requirement in combating Red corrosion tactics. While a prisoner, he had three crises with "canaries'" that almost proved his undoing. For seven months he was kept in solitary confinement. He saiel: "I had no sense of loneliness. I kept myself busy. I relaxed by focusing on anything that could take my mind oil the Beds. I observed everything possible. I made a study ot how a fly lands on the ceiling. I examined what spiders do when non-edible matter enters their webs." They came to Dave about germ warfare one day and demanded he write something about it. He wrote that it w-.es contrary to the principles ol the U. S., adding that he himself saw no reason why America shouldn't use it, that he himself wouldn't hesitate using it, but that he was sure the U. S. hadn't done so. He was serving a three-month jail sentence at the time, anel they doubled it for this frank opinion. "The Reds were constantly on the watch." Dave said, "for some excuse to charge you with having a hostile attitude. Another opening the Heels eagerly awaited was loss of temper. This was a major crime in their book." They continued to indoctrinate, argue, threaten. One freezing night, when they hael imprisoned Dave in an icy bathouse built by the Japanese while they ran Korea as a colony, he wrote on the wall some words which came to him in a flash: Black in black and white is white. Neither torture, maltreatment, nor intimidation can change a fact. To argue the point with me who is color-blind screes no useful purpose. Later, six different p.o.w.'s told him they had memorized the words, anel hadn't given in to their tormentors. The Red examiners hadn't seen it. The bathouse had been too cold for them to enter. 9. The British in Korea. The British groups stymied the Heel ineloctrinators on the germ-warfare charges by enduring the accusations for a while, then popping such epiestions as, "Tell us, how did those infected flies live at a temperature of 10 degrees below zero? Did the efficient Americans design special little overcoats for them?" British sense of humor went from this to roughhousing. A p.o.xv., wanting some cigaret tobacco, would ask: "Anybody got a roll?" Someone would reply, "He wants a roll, fellows." And they'd all pounce on him ancl roll him along the floor. Then they'd politely help him to his feet and give him what he first asked for — if thex- had it — in a poker-faced, most dignified manner. The Reds didn't get it; couldn't think of a wax- to ban it. A number of American p.o.w.'s told me about British pluck ancl comraeleliness. They managed to have their lea at ten and lour." Wilkins told me. "The-y rarely had any tea, of course, and were lucky when thex- managed hot water. But they had plenty of ceremony and went about it xvith the utmost composure and seemed not to have the least xvorry in the world. They might have been worrying themselves sick a minute before, and would start right afterward — but not during tea-time. "They simply didn't notice that they were not drinking tea. The only mention of tea xvas the call, 'Tea's up!' Then nobody referred to there not being any, any more than they would have complained about the lack of it had S/Sgt. Robert Wilkins i le Forces Commander, after as one of thc first U. S Big Switch. ft talks with Gen. 0. P. Weyland, the Sergeant landed at an aitbase Air Force men to be repatriated L WORLD PHOTO Far East Air near Tokyo, in Operation l'\< is Forum News, December, 1956 Page 25
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