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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
File 026
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 026. 1956-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/655.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-12). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 026. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/655

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 026, 1956-12, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/655.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date December 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 026
Transcript Air Force Captain Zach Dean, who was shot down in Korea, embraces his wife at airbase in Japan, following his repatriation in the final exchange of sick and wounded war prisoners at Panmunjom. While her husband was held prisoner, Mrs. Dean did Red Cross work in Tokyo. wide: ss-EERi.n photo front: "How did the colored man come out in comparison with the whites?" "Fine," he replied. Others told me the same. I did some investigating on my own, and discovered that the Beds had dismally failed in their attempts to squeeze racist propaganda out of their colored captives. Talking to repatriated Negroes, I found that they had seen through the enemy right from the start; they could detect racist cheese by its smell, no matter how- it was camouflaged. A quality that stood them in great stead is exemplified in Negro songs. They are generally without bitterness, without hate. Bitterness and hate are negative reactions, anel sour a man. In the long pull, the p.o.w.'s primary objective was to protect his own facilities, to keep hope up. When this was lost. SO was the mind. The Be-els kept chiseling away at his hope. Therefore, the person to whom hope (optimism) i.s second nature, is the toughest nut for Commies to crack. 5. Ill un Marlatt. Army Captain Herbert E. Marlatt was a victim of Communist brutality. The Beds had often kicked him ancl beaten him with clubs, in irritation over his failure to break. On his back, the jellied flesh had developed into a tumor. I visited him in the military hospital at Mt. Clemens, Michigan. Here is part of his story. He had been, for long weeks, in thc Death March under North Korea's "Tiger." Any man who faltered xx as battered over the skull and shoved or kicked off the road, to become one more corpse among hundreds. Herb saxx- men summarily executed for the crime of being sick or wounded. Men marched shoeless, in cotton clothes. All down the line-, limbs were freezing and gangrene spreading unchecked. Why should anyone go on xvith it? xxas the state of mind of the remnant who dragged into the first permanent camp. Then spoke up John J. Dunn, who had served in the Burma jungle xvith Merrill's Marauders. His voice was angry — there was no despair in him; he was all rage. "Those so-and-so ancl so-and-so's!" he cried. "They're completely evil!" (Those were not his exact words. ) "They will never listen to any reason except force! Their kind of \ iciousness has to be wiped out on a battlefield. It won't ever be solved at a conference table; it can only be cut out. like a cancer! "Men, that's why we're here! When that day comes, and we meet communism on the battlefield, our country will Page 24 need people who have seen its face and know what it is. That's why we have to survive, so we can go home ancl let our people know. Of course that's why we're here! We must survive — that's our job now!" When the men heard that, Herb told me, it was as if they had been given a shot in the arm. They had a purpose; there was meaning to their suffering. Whereas the moment before they had hoped for death, feeling the hopelessness of their plight, now they knew they had to survive — a reason that was incalculably more powerful than the pains they were suffering. The men were now certain that they were in on the ground floor of what was actually a phase of World War III. From that time on, Dunn kept stressing that the men must regard their captivity as a tremendously important opportunity to understand and interpret the Chinese Communist mind, and to find the most effective ways of reacting to the Reds and their environment. "We can succeed in our job," he kept saying, "only if we get out of here alive." Instead of being discouraged by the enemy's pressures and being caught off balance, the prisoners met each blow with eagerness. They discounted the Red propaganda- Herb was positive that those in his regiment who survived did so because of Dunn's inspiration. 6. Zach Dean. Captain Zach W. Dean of the U. S. Air Force was an oil-field engineer from Oklahoma, with deep- set eyes. When I asked how long he had been a prisoner, he said: "Two years and four days." I almost expected him him to add the hours anel minutes. "The Beds brought you to the point of death and then revived you," Zach said. "Then again they brought you to death's door, and when you were about to enter, they pulled you back. After the Reds did this a few times, you were thankful to them for saving your life." Dean frequently referred to the way the Communists seemed to know everything that took place in the camps- "We could keep nothing from them!" he exclaimed. Th*5 illusion of knowing everything was one of communisms most powerful weapons. In some p.o.w. camps the Reds made it more than an illusion — they did find out everything. A few of the weaklings made it possible. "You couldn't trust a single person," Zach said. "The way the Beds got hold of almost every scrap of inform*' tion was eerie." Yet thex- didn't know everything. "A small group <" Masons remained intact during their captivity," he told me. "The Reds never found out. The mere knowledge 0*8* they were able to keep this group in existence was a tremendous boost to morale. These men, strengthened by this proof that the Reds were not supermen, maintained :1 good record against crack-ups." 7. Rorert Wilkins. Robert Wilkins was given the works, yet came out intact in body anel soul. He was a master technical sergeant, a man whose mind was filled with details the Heels wanted. He came from Detroit, • city the Commies detested because its workers owned their homes ancl drove their own cars, making them "cap1' talists," ancl turning the conventional Heel language of class war into utter nonsense. Hob helped ferry the- first American warplanes to Indochina. Soon he was flying into Korea, sometimes on f"1'1' or five missions daily, in B-26 light bombers. These xxe-ic Facts Forum News, December. 1956 I- XI is
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