Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
File 025
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 025. 1956-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/654.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-12). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 025. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/654

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 025, 1956-12, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/654.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date December 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 025
Transcript ing the Korean war, submitted by the Reds to reporters an interview. Marlin appeared worn arid strained. In his tense state, If an hour was all the press could have. He spoke earn- ;ly ancl contritely. He said he hoped the Chinese- anel irean people would forgive his misdeeds, anel explained th disarming frankness how he had engaged in germ- irl'are attacks against the peasantry. His eyes looked initely sad. The fast flow of his answers remove-el any cpticism. VVhat particularly impressed reporters xvas the hank iy Marlin answered their toughest questions. He showed i hesitancy. Now they had the final proof that America d engaged in cowardly and loathsome germ warfare. ii -x had the details from a man who had done it! Numerous editors all over the world informed their xu I its that such disclosures could not be brushed lightly side. The editors said they were being objective. After all, ■adn't it been a group interview? Sound films had been Hade of the interview. Thc films were shown to selected roups at parties given by Red diplomats. n moTo Outsiders did not know that Marlin had been "pre- Bred," rigorously and at great length, for that "scoop" iterview. ioned- [-ctical 2. S.\M Dean. An elderly American engineer named 1/ had am Deai., who had been a college teacher in China for isis of 'any years ancl had had nothing to do with politics, fell lorror. Ictim to the Communist invaders ancl felt the full weight i the confession technique. For months they bombarded him with questions, accusa- ions, and orders to write, write, and keep on writing mman verything he had ever known, everything he had ever appen bne. He was deprived of food and rest. Teams of fresh xment nterrogators came in relays, hammering at him every natu- pinute. Then they told him that he had confessed to many ■d the rimes, including that of being a spy. He xxas too dazed 'avlov. 0 have the least idea of what he had said or written. -ttings [hey said they ought to punish him more but because ill (he f his age they would let him leave China. I His wife brought him home to America. For a long t one: gantic aining e per- anner. joined rompt ixxash- nce i'1 lahzed peace, actios- in tin' gation ave in , were sd the igainst S. Kit ■isonei iine he was practically unconscious of all that went on pound him. Most distressing was his loss of memory. roper environment in America, loving care, and steady ■evotion to work gradually restored Sam to mental and physical health. He says: "They trap you like a rat. Finally, you have to take their line." 3. John D. Hayes. Hayes was a highly educated, analytic man, a missionary. He bad studied psychology and new of Pavlov's theories although, when arrested, he didn't dream that the physiologist's experiments would 'elate to his case. I met him about hall a year after his release from a Communist prison in central China, where he had undergone intense- brainwashing. He was then able to give only a smattering account of it. When he searched his mind for details, it hurt. The agony that brainwashing imposes on its victims was still 'n his eyes. We met next more than a year later. He was now able to present an integrated account of how he had been led by subtle anel brutal pressures to believe and admit what 'lad never taken place. Most important was the fact that He took all the Beds dealt him, yet beat them in the end. The Beds we-re- never able to achieve their primary objec- 110 I Pacts Foiu m News, December, 1956 tixe- with him. His mind kept slipping away from them. His experiences exposed the fatal limitations of brainwashing. Hayes was constantly hungry. He felt drugged from lack of sleep. The brainwashing chamber was a downstairs room in the prison, about twelve by eighteen feet, where he faced from one to seven inquisitors ancl torturers. Brainwashing victims from East Europe have described similar courts to me, with hypnotists ancl psychiatrists on the stalf. The court informed Hayes he was head spy for all Southwest China and demanded he fill in the details for them by confessions. They insisted he reveal his connections with the FBI; they provided what they called proof ancl spent ten steady days pounding on this. They gave him thinking assignments on which be had to write and report. The tension was like a drill piercing his mind, worse than physical suffering. They gave him Mao's books to study in his cell; they had him write a long autobiography; they wore him down xxith insane, repetitious questioning. They would get him all wound up and bewildered over nothing. He realized that there was a devilish consistency and persistence about all this treatment from the Reds. Finally, after three-quarters of a year of uninterrupted, intensix-e drilling away at his mind, he was in no shape to reason things out. Hallucination took possession of him. He became wholly unconcerned over what the Reds might elo to him. Their objective xvas to "convert" him, to indoctrinate him into their ideology, actually to win his loyalty, on the firm conviction that environment, if the pressure is sufficient, will not only break a man but remake him. He defeated them at their own tactics. After that, he felt sure they xvould either release or murder him. It happened to be, for Hayes, release. Later, much later, Hayes could analyze his little battle in the brain warfare that is being waged around the world. "The more I think of it." he said to me, "the surer I am that the mind is influenced to a great extent by environment and training, but that the really decisive, controlling element is the spirit. You can't crack that if it is sound." When Hayes discussed this with medical men in America, a San Francisco psycho-analyst told him: "Your mind gave way when you had your hallucination. That saved you. You were intact, only your mind had cracked. The Reds couldn't do any more to you. Your spirit had escaped them." This was a medical man's analysis, uninfluenced by missionary thought. Yet on this field of battle of the mind, these two men saw eye to eye. 4. The Negro as P.O.W. In the prisoner-of-war camps in North Korea, the dark-skinned American was put on his mettle racially because the Communists insisted on appealing to him as a Negro. Tbe- color ol his skin was constantly emphasized as his all-important characteristic, lie- xvas pitted against his country, symbolized in the person of the white man. But thex- failed to gain the great propaganda victory thex- hael counted on, to win the minds of non-white- peoples of the world. Out of thousands of Negroes taken prisoner, only three were among the cowed ancl upset lads who said they did not want to return home to America. I asked a newspaperman just back from the Korean Page 23
File Name uhlib_1352973_v005_n012_025.jpg