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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
File 004
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 004. 1956-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 24, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/633.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-12). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 004. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/633

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956 - File 004, 1956-12, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 24, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/699/show/633.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 12, December 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date December 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript An Editorial -'^sC^-T-r- \ \ Tkcf^rok By Zell Skillern, Editor of Facts Forum News EVERYONE is talking about peace. The housewife speaks proudly of her young son in a non-shooting military service. The man in the street waxes eloquent on peace as he discusses the merits and shortcomings of public political figures. Even the two leading candidates in the recent presidential election made their campaign kickoff speeches primarily on the subject — with Adlai Stevenson taking as his theme, "Freedom, Human Welfare, and Peace," and Dwight D. Eisen- hoxxe-r choosing simple" tbe topic, "Peace." The free world has even accustomed itself to hearing protestations of a desire for peace from the leaders of the Communist world. Khrushchev, Bulganin, and Tito, during thc year just past, have donned smiling masks and traveled hither and yon in a campaign of sweetness and light in order to beguile the unsuspecting into a false sense of security. In spite of all the cries of "peace, peace," informed and thinking people, far from being reassured, realize that though peace is a noble dream, it is not a present reality. Actually, the Kremlin declared war on thc rest of the world more than four decades ago when Lenin set forth thc dictum that the Communist aim was world conquest. The Soviet rulers have never retracted this goal, but have continued to use it as their guiding principle. Even during the past few months they have stated that the USSR xx ill give up the goal of world domination "when shrimps learn to whistle and when iron turns to wood." jjince July 26, when thc dictator of Egypt, Carnal Abdel Nasser, nationalized the 103-mile Suez Canal, long used by all countries as an international waterway, the anxious eye-s of the world have been riveted on the Middle East. With war clouds hovering darkly in this area, the hope of the world turned to the United Nations Security Council. Here xxas a chance for it to show its effectiveness, or lack of it! With the plan authored by John Foster Dulles and adopted in London by eighteen of the principal user nations, as a springboard for negotiation, the Security Council worked desperately to formulate a plan of canal operation acceptable to all the nations concerned. It looked as if success were in sight when six major points of agreement xvere- reached in UN Secretary Dag Hammar- skjold's office through private conversations with British Foreign Minister Sehsxn Lloyd, French Foreign Minister Christian Pineau, and Egyptian Foreign Minister Mahmoud Fawqi. However, the eleven-member UN Security Council failed to endorse the plan for international operation of the canal because of the vetoes of Soviet Foreign Minister Dmitri T. Shepilov anel Yugoslav Foreign Minister Popovic. To those already doubtful of any value the United States may have derived from the millions of American dollars poured out to Communist Yugoslavia, this veto only served to crystallize their displeasure at the drain on their tax pockets. Conforming xxith (he usual Communist line, Shepilov stated, even as he vetoed the Council's endorsement of the agreement, that Russia wanted to cooperate in some plan for peaceful solution of the problem! Many people hael looked hopefully to the peaceful solution of the Suez problem by the United Nations as an opportunity for that organization to display world leadership and insure for itself the prestige which xvould enable it to preserve peace, ancl fulfill the purpose for which it was established. However, Russia again demonstrated to the world that she is a member of the United Nations only to ruin its effectiveness. She- does not want a satisfactory settlement of the Suez controversy, or for the United Nations to be an effective instrument in an) other matter of world importance. The only thing accomplished by the Security Council's con sideration of the Suez difficulty was the revelation, xvith al disguises torn aside, of how the nations of the- world are aligned; with Russia, its satellite bloc, and the "neutrals' Yugoslavia and Egypt opposing the majority of the member nations of the United Nations, including the eighteen principal world powers which objected to nationalization of the Suez Canal- Hiven the casual observer on the world scene begins to view the Suez problem as only one furunculous manifestation of the encompassing malignancy of hate, oppression, and tyranny. It is obvious that Communist gangsters would corrupt the whole world by propagating this particular brand of "peace." Before these words are printed, the smoldering fires of another tension area in the Middle East max have- burst into a holocaust of war between Israel and the Arab countries. In such eventuality, is there any doubt that the remainder of the world would not also become embroiled in the conflict? Many quasi-informed persons state that we are in no great clanger of war; that Russia does not want an atomic war any more than does the United States. That brings one to consider the definition of war! Francis E. Walter, Chairman of the House Committee on Un-American Activities, states in his forexvord to "Soviet Total War," the latest Symposium published by his Committee, that "Truly, the Russian masters and their fanatical followers are engaged in a total war — that is, in a war on every plane and in every sphere of activity." Congressman Walter further states that the more than 120 contributors to the Symposium, all well-known authorities on the phase of the subject on which they have written, agree in their conviction that the Communist threat is clearly the greatest danger the free world has ever had to face. He writes. "They unmask its deceits and subterfuges — its relentless psychological, political, economic, sociological, and military strategies. Like all reasonable people, these- contributors elo not desire war, but only a lasting peace. On tbe other hand, they are fully aware that, in hoping for peace, we cannot permit ourselves to be frozen into extinction as free men . . . either we prevent the achievement of communism's 'historic mission'" or we perish." Subsequent issues of Facts- Forum News will bring to i's readers some of the outstanding article's comprising the above; mentioned Symposium, just as a number of articles were presented in past issues from the Committee's previous Symposium entitled "The Great Pretense," in which thirty-nine expert* found that the program outlined at the 20th Conununist Congress constituted the greatest menace in the- entire- history 01 the world Communist movement. As we come to another Christmas season, with a situation 0* tension, fear, and anxiety throughout the world, who would deny that the age-long symbol of tranquillity, the Dove eif Peace, has a broken wing and can no longer soar in unhampered flight through cloudless skies of prosperity and good xxill among men? B, Page 2 Factts Forum News, December, 1956
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