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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955
File 004
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955 - File 004. 1955-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 23, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/419/show/353.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955 - File 004. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/419/show/353

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955 - File 004, 1955-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 23, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/419/show/353.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 5, May 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript A Dan Smoot pro-and-con presentation * 1 « E?" Ike's Highway Program % ii 11 vol apple.ve of Ike's pnipused ten-vear bishwa) building program? • • • \s iisiieel. let's answer lln- question from two opposite points of view. taking first the arguments of wbk who sji, YF.S. From the beginning of our nation's history, the federal governmenl has been interested in national highways and other transportation. George' Washington, for example, envisioned the penetration of lhe forests thai lav between the Atlantic seaboard and the Ohio \ alley, and he supported recommendations for public improvement of post roads. .Jefferson, too, favored improvements in transportation. As early as 1806 the federal government aided financially in the construction of the "Cumberland lb..nl. stretching from the Last Coast to the Ohio. Lack of funds, however. prohibited further governmenl participation in road building.1 During the next forty years, the (aim berland Road was extended to Jefferson City, Missouri, at a cost eif approximately six million dollars in federal money.' In 1829 lhe first steam locomotive in thc I nited States was given a trial run. and tin- railroad dominated transportation fur the rest of the century. Highways wen- merely dirt rueids. used ■ inly by a few travelers and for hauling freight to railroad junctions.2 Page 2 I In- good-roads movemenl became' ee major issue with lln- coming of the automobile, which revolutionized the American way of life In 1912. >500,000 wa- appropriated hy ihe federal governmenl to pay one- third of ihe cosi of improving roads over which lhe mails were carried.' In thi- senile year, Congress instituted a sludy nf lhe highway problem. This stud) was completed in 1915 and served ei- the' basis feer tin- Federal Road Act nf 1916. tlie real beginning of the federal road-aid program as we know it le.il.av . Lv this acl the- federal governmenl was empowered tu grant assistance' to lb. states Im inail construction. Tee be' eligible for such assistance, the states hail lo sel up highway agencies eiml match tin' federal funds with an equal amount of state funds.1 Encouraged bv this federal interest ami assistance, the states sel up large road construction programs. In the 1920's. ihe main effort was in do something fur the mud-bound fanners. Vehicles moved slowl) the average' speed weis twenty-six iniles em hour— and traffic congestion was unknown, lhe main objective nf highway builders was lo e,.| lb.' country OUt of the mud. anil they sacrificed belter future planning for quantity building of narrow, ungraded highways. These 1920 standards for roads were' not raised during the 1930's, because of the depression years with their accent nn maximum on- ihe-joh labor and lhe minimum use "' materials and equipment.3 MODEL-T ROADS FOR SUPERCARS We are, in fact, slill using highway8 built for the Model-T, and thev eif deathtraps for toeleiv's superautomobiles. In 1025 there' we're- twenty million motor vehicles on our roads ami streets. liv 1930, the number nl" motor vehicle* heul increased beyond all expectation* ami every bighwa) became a raceway' Trucks became eis large as freight cars. I n.lei the strain nf numbers, weigh'- and Speed, the nhl mails were w.'eiru1 nul ami costing I.... much to maintain. World Wen II interrupted lb.' steps being leiki'ii In snlve- lhe' highweiv problem. Civilian travel was limited b) gas0- line- rationing. Manufacture ..I "''" vehicles ami tires was nil off. The hi?'1' ways we're- called on in earr) hug' quantities of war go.eel-. Millim'" streamed onto lln- highways to commuf each day In work eil disleml weir plant* l!v the time the wen Wei- nveT. I"' loll iii damaged, neglected roads ^^ heavy. And lhe normal program ° replacement eiml improvemenl was o< layeil bei years because ..I high \"'"'". eiml shortages uf materials, men. am machinery. Within a year after World War U- peacetime traffic bail broken all I"' war records. Hut mail building I"'' »rams did not gel going until 19-18- Driving a ear became ei peacetime batu on roads lhal wen ahead) ancient. facts FOKUM NEWS, !/»//■ '■"■'"' Yel u •utomol Otl ulna Our e actuall) ''-i-einhb 'In- doc "liieh n "eiv ,(. nil,, evei Ever) -'Minn" dollars t lv" prod "ill |3 » dange '"ev int ;ll"l till, demand c»rs ami "r our n lh"v cur -'•'leieillv TRAFFI Tbe | Already, million I '""biles. ">jured. accidents ^Honiol ;K 'lleillv 111 'M oui "' traffi, ""' nun, »Wce th,- '"'t 17,", y ACTS
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