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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 11, November 1956
File 011
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 11, November 1956 - File 011. 1956-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 23, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/349/show/290.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-11). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 11, November 1956 - File 011. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/349/show/290

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 11, November 1956 - File 011, 1956-11, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 23, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/349/show/290.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 11, November 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date November 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript It has been charged that one who does not exercise his voting privilege not only shirks his duty to both country and self, but is, in reality, only half a citizen. FEW will argue that the spirit of a nation is reflected in its nomination and election procedures. "•here there are dictatorships, the people can be herded like animals to the Polls and forced to vote — without teally giving them a choice as to a J-*ndidate. Moreover, they may even J6 required to rejoice later when their -candidate" is "elected." , A free election, however, with free | c«Oice of candidates, actually tends to **alt the voter. When a citizen casts ">s ballot, he knows that his "voice" Wil li,. heard. A free election in this Pountry, conducted with dignity, is jVtnboh'c of the American way of life. '"'ctions are closely detailed, so as to Ittard against fraud. Yet at the- same tale the honest voter is not shackled. •ccording tit the Constitution, Con- "*,('Vs may decide how and when its Nmbers shall be chosen. Also, it may '-'hiinine the time of choosing prcsi- ll|'iitial electors, as well as where these i*Ctors shall meet to east ballots for •*e President. However, the federal pvernmenl has always exercised min- '"'ini controls in this respect. I'he individual states regulate elec- '°ns to a marked degree, for not only .'r|' elections run by the states, but taty are also paid for by them. In ?r"<-'r to insure an honest vote-, the rSslature ol each state has compiled *''ciok of election laws and rules.1 Naturally, it is the patriotic duty of each American citizen to east his ballot. His voice in the government may be small, but it xvill be heard. One who is an eligible voter, and who does not exercise his privilege, is shirking his duty to both himself and his Country, and is, in reality, only half a citizen. Indeed, il has been charged that there is more voter indifference today than there has been in many years. For example, the United States' estimated civilian population and votes cast for presidential electors are as follows:2 In 1936 there Were only 57 per cent of eligible citizens who voted. In 1941 there were only 53 per rent of eligible citizens who voted. In 1952 then- were only 63 per cent of clifsihlc citizens who voted. Most people grow up with the thought thai voting is now and has always been something of an inalienable right. However, this is not true-. Certainly many of the early great men of this nation entertained no such idea. As a matter of fact, Alexander Hamilton SO distrusted the motives of most individuals and all public bodies that he said the President and members of the Senate should be chosen for life rather than by periodic voting. There were others who believed that only a qualified majority should vote. Property owners were the only ones allowed to have a hand in the selec tion of public officials in the early history of this country. However, after the American Revolution, the people began to demand greater voting equality. Andrew Jackson was one of the early proponents of equal suffrage, and he campaigned as hard for his rough-hewn ideas as he did in the actual battles which he fought. From Jackson's time until the present there have been two strong forces at work. One force would extend suffrage to more and more people. The other force would improve the quality of \otcis by stipulating that the voter must have certain qualifications. A striking omission in the Constitution concerns the issue of voting rights. Actually, the right is given to no one. The architects of the Constitution simply insisted that only those eligible to participate in electing members of the more numerous branches of the state legislature shall be entitled to vote for federal officials. A century ancl a quarter later the Seventeenth Amendment applied the same rule to the election of United States senators. The adoption of the Fifteenth Amendment, at the close of the war between the states, provided, (Continued an page 46) 'Robert Hienow, American C-eei wrnmsnl in To- tbty'i World (Be.sIee,,, 1950), p. 144. *Hsirry Hansen, editor, The Worid Almanac and Book of Facts (New York, 1956), p. 256. Forum News, November, 1956 Page 9
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