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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
File 063
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 063. 1956-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1602.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-10). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 063. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1602

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 063, 1956-10, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1602.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date October 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 063
Transcript •w%« inneU LETTERS to the EDITORS ♦ •••••••••••♦•••••••••■sir****-* VICTOR RIESEL To the Chicago American: One ol Cod's most precious gifts, that of sight, has been snatched from Victor Riesel. Killing him would not have satis- fled his enemies; thee- prefer to revel in his permanent torture. 1 believe the wrong script was used by these beasts, because this man, dedicated to labor (as his father before him), is not planning to wither and die. He will continue his fight for the decency ancl dignity of the millions of labor men who deplore the strangle hold on them by goons and Communists. We all could take a lesson from Riesel, those of us xvho fall back at the slightest setback, and who are heckled every time *e have the courage to stand up and be banted. Nothing i.s worth while unless it is ■vorth fighting for. Riesel has been put to the "acid test." and has not been found Panting. We should emulate his courage. Bea von Boeselacer 716 Merrill Avenue Park Ridge, Illinois WE HAVE LITTLE TO SAY To the Fort Worth Star-Telegram: "That government of the people, by the pople, for the people shall not perish POm the earth" — thus spoke Abraham Mncoln. For the average citizen this has hppened. We have little to say about J'ho bee es a candidate for President. We do not vote directly for him; and, pee he becomes President, we have IWhing to say about whom the many Mildreds of appointive officials will be. 'heir orders and directives are our daily •are. Laws affecting us most are not enacted y the Congress but are presidential directives or rulings by his appointees ^hieh become the supreme laee' of the •"id, under decisions by life-time ap- gointives whose main qualifications are heir known political leanings. The average citizen has little to do *ith government on (he national scale; W, unless present trends are reversed. e will soon lose control of all local "fairs, including public schools and "-ads. Paul Gafford 200 West Belknap Jacksboro,Texas *Vts Forum News, October. 1956 MALCONTENTS OR HEROES? To the Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph: On March 21 a local newspaper objected editorially to "malcontents" bringing lawsuits against the city. The editorial concludes with a plea for majority rule." Majority rule doesn't always bring justice. There is one school of thought that holds to the view that government is always right and individual citizens are alxvays wrong; that if a thing is dead wrong to begin with, the fact that government does it makes it right both legally and morally. The courts are the refuge of the oppressed. It is their function to establish fair plav in order that government may not become too arbitrary for the good of its citizens. What we have to fear is not "malcontents" but apathy. Arthur E. Walker 2430 West Platte Avenue Colorado Springs, Colorado HIGH SUPPORTS AND PRICE DECLINES To the Des Moines Register: Many farmers, voters and congressmen seem obsessed with the idea that a stomach-ache caused by too many green apples may be cured by eating more of the same. This is paralleled in the ill- chosen demand for high support for farm products, as the record ol facts eeill indicate. The index level of farm prices from the end of 1952 to the end of November, 1955, dropped 15 points. This was during the administration of President Eisenhower. In this connection it should be noted that those prices declined 18 points in the last 21 months of Truman's reign, and that of the total decline of 33 points since 1952, 27 points were lost during thc period of high-price support. C. W. Wakeman Friendship Haven Fort Dodge, Iowa THE USURPER To the Editor: The horse and buggy and the horse- drawn wagon gave xvay inevitably to the automobile and motor truck because they provided the people something better. All through the history of our nation are countless examples of products and services being supplanted by others that offered better services or lower prices. But today, unfortunately for the public as well as business, government with its regulations — too often unrealistic — seems to be usurping poxver. It does not and should not have power to the point xvhere it can control prices, instead of permitting normal and natural competition. Our country was built on competition, not on government regulation. With greater freedom in competition among the different types of transportation, the same as in any other field of business xvith each user free to choose that which best meets his needs, the real gainer in the end would be the consuming public. Ernie Waters Route 2 Laeerenceburg, Tennessee DOUBTS HISS IS "INSPIRATION" To the Miami News: The lecture circuit for our colleges must be scraping the bottom of the barrel xx-hen Alger Hiss finds himself on the platform at Princeton University. It goes to shoxv how far afield the accepted doctrine of compromise can lead our intellectuals in their efforts to be "broad- minded." If we were to read in our history books that Benedict Arnold lectured at an institution of learning after his defection, we would be justified in wondering if our Founding Fathers had a code of ethics. In our day when even treason can find apologists, it is not surprising to note the toleration for such a news item. College students can be reasonably considered as the future leaders of the nation. What possible inspiration for patriotism and devotion to country can be gleaned bv American youth sitting in an auditorium with Alger Hiss, No. 1 traitor to his country, on the rostrum? Mary G. McElwee 57 Campina Court Coral Gables, Florida GOVERNMENT LIKE A CAMEL To the Birmingham Post-Herald: The government reminds me of a camel. We read of a kindly Arab a long time ago. One cold night on the desert the Arab let the camel warm himself a little by sticking his nose inside the tent. Then the camel put his head into the tent, then his neck and back, until finally the whole camel was inside and there was no room for the Arab. He had to craevl outside in the cold. Increasing large-scale government competition in farm marketing is croxvding out private businessmen, and threatening to destroy our free markets. It seems that everyone connected with the agricultural industry from the farmer Page 61
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