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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
File 055
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 055. 1956-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1594.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-10). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 055. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1594

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 055, 1956-10, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1594.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date October 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 055
Transcript that took that matter to the Security Council when aggression was committed by Pakistan, and this has been admitted by the United Nations Commission — that aggression was committed." "Mr. Ambassador, I have no hope of getting the Kashmir question solved on this program," stated Mr. Lindley. I would like to go to the question of aid to India. The United States is providing some technical assistance and some economic assistance to India at the present time, isn't it?" "It is 'some' in relation to the total nagnitude of our plan," replied Mr. Mehta, "but it has been most useful." He adeleel that this constituted economic as well as technical assistance. "There have been no strings attached to that which were embarrassing (o India?" asked Mr. Lindley. Mr. Mehta agreed that there had not been. Nehru Speaks of "Strings" Attached "Why is it that your Prime Minister, Mien he discusses these matters, so often intimates that there is a problem "f strings attached?" inquired Mr. Lindley. "He doesn't say that our aid ''as strings attached, but I see in his Beech on March 29th he saiel that, there is nothing wrong about the Pcher countries from their own view- Point or any other giving aid to the development of these countries (mean- lng the underdeveloped countries).' •Oat is a direct epiote. Then he goes °n to say, 'However, what we have to •Vatch about — they may sometimes rani something in exchange.' He ''"csu'l seem to realize that we have an interest in the survival of India ^hicli we've demonstrated by putting his i iu nicy in without any strings attached. Why does he keep on talking ■•bout strings?" Is there any reference there that •he United States has given aid to "dia with strings?" queried Mr. V'(-lit.,. 'No. he doesn't mention the United Jtsites at all," replied Mr. Lindley. fhit he does say 'they' — and the use **' 'they' would logically refer to the "''"at powers. . . ." Mr. Mehta indicated disagreement °n this score, stating that Mr. Nehru v°ulel not accept aid of that nature. . "I think you will admit, Mr. I.ind- •'>'." he continued, "that there is a F*tain amount of irritation in this gUntry among at least certain sections P the people when aid is given to a b *>cts Forum News, October, 1956 country that does not follow the same- foreign policy as you elo. Ancl similarly there is a feeling in other countries that they have an obligation to a single individual country. While this is not a question of any kind of 'owner's condition' laid down for the aid, there is a psychological feeling, certainly, which could be averted if it were possible to channel this aid through the United Nations, where the country itself could give some assistance." Mr. Mehta made reference to India's participation in the Colombo Plan, pointing out that under that plan India also gives some technical assistance with what little resources it has. "But, Mr. Ambassador, why should India object to taking aid directly from the United States?" Mr. Lindley asked. "Well, it does not object, or else it wouldn't have taken it," Mr. Mehta replied flatly, refusing to classify the "psychological feeling" he had referred to as "objection." "I am sure they wouldn't," pursued Mr. Lindley, "but here is Mr. Nehru (as you have just said) favoring giving aid through the United Nations. What's wrong with the way it's being done now?" Collective Source Preferred Ambassador Mehta's reply indicated that in the eyes of India, at least, there would be less feeling that strings of foreign control accompanied foreign aid if this were channeled through tbe United Nations ancl reached recipient nations from a collective source. "It is not myself alone who say this," he pointed out. "Mr. Stevenson has said this. Mr. Cabot Lodge has more or less supported this. Mr. Lester Pearson has saiel something similar. Monsieur Pineau has said this." Mr. Mehta was most emphatic, and using his preceding remarks as a springboard, launched into the subject uppermost in American minds as one upon which India and the United States disagree. "Now you think," he continued, "that every proposition that is made that is not liked by you is made by an Indian. That is not so. China's admission to the United Nations is not urged by India only. I can mention a dozen countries, including Sweden ancl many European countries which have embassies in Peiping! You know that." Mr. Lindley indicated that he was aware of that fact. Changing the subject at an oppor tune moment, Mr. Lucas reopened the question of Kashmir, asking Ambassador Mehta if India would agree to a plebiscite there, which drew the reply that Prime Minister Nehm had made it clear that conditions for plebiscite elo not exist at present. "What are those conditions?" inquired Mr. Lucas. "Well, the first condition is that there is no agreement about the number of troops that are to be retained in Kashmir." replied Mr. Mehta. "We don't think it would be a fair plebiscite just now. Secondly, you also xx-ill realize that if the plebiscite had been held in the beginning, it would have been another thing. It is so difficult now, you see. You must realize India today has 45 million Moslems. It is not true to say that because there are a majority of Moslems in one place, certain areas should go to the Moslems. What should we do? Supposing the Kashmir question i.s settled on the religious issue. What then do we do ee ith our 42 or 45 million Moslems? In other words, xve are trying to build a secular state, and in that secular state we do not admit the principle that man's religion has anything to do xvith his nationality." "Mr. Ambassador, I wonder if you could specifically indicate the things that this country ought to do to improve its standing with India," inquired Mr. Lindley. "What definitely should we do?" Would Prevent Competition in Aid "Well before that may I revert one minute to the previous question?" asked Mr. Mehta. "What I was saying about this channeling of United Nations aid. I realize that this may not be a completely practical proposition at the moment. But you must realize that you can also obviate certain amounts of competition by this method. What happens today? Your feeling is that some country says. 'You give us aid — otherwise we will go to the other side'; or they will say to the other side, 'You give us aid. or otherwise we will go to the United States.' Now that could be avoided. Your feeling is, for example, that Soviet Russia wants to give aid in order to spread communism. If it is done through the United Nations there is some control ancl some supervision. Secondly, those countries which say they arc prepared to help if it is through tbe United Nations will be put to a test." Mr. Wilson pointed out that we had Page 53
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