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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
File 053
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 053. 1956-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1592.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-10). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 053. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1592

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 053, 1956-10, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1592.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date October 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 053
Transcript kmail have if the Reds. ve traveled Communist so ith Korea in the Indo- laces where jeople cage' nns. Even i" in national found those e they may hey at leas' id and con- tt, 1$ i The film need not ancl should not be shown with an American government credit line. They need only be made available, to the scattering of staunch ancl still active anti-Communist Chinese, to the scores of American mission schools, to the trade guilds, and to the chambers of commerce. There is such a film now- available. ft could be made in three Chinese dialect versions, in color, xvith copies for every country in Southeast Asia, for a total of $10,000. But when I discussed this idea with a USIS official in the far East, be said wearily, "Yes, it is an pcellent idea. But they xvon't see it in Washington." The United States Information Agency has some excellent men in the far East (ancl also several whose Qualifications are distinctly limited). 't is doing a fair to excellent job in Hong Kong, Saigon and Taipei. In Singapore and Thailand it might just ■j well go out of business. But much °' I'SIS's troubles stem from the Washington preconception of what "lakes g00d propaganda. "SiS Presently Mis-Firing A few weeks ago a typical USIS Project was announced: a 5,000 vol- pie collection of American books (in English) is being sent to Indonesia, •^here most people cannot read anv- ■hing. much less English. After the People- of Indonesia are properly ini- Pi'i-sscd by books they cannot read. PSIS plans to ship this magnificent Election to India. Another current project is a twenty- '"'i cxlnl.il called "The Peoples' Capi- Wism," designed to show all the xvon- ''ers of life in America. The people of f*ja have but to follow the path of f*pitalism anil thev, too. can have flush '"'lets and electricity. That the people of Southeast Asia '-'ve needs more transcending than ''"'ctiicity will come- as a grave shock " Washington propagandists. And it is ' Course' heretical anil even subver- Fe to imply that 5,000 beautifully- "iiiid American books will not make fiends for America. Hooks and the printed word in genial have a place in the fight. Hut nol Poks in English, nor expensive books. '-'i .ind oxer again, from Tokyo to "igapore, I was told of the need of f'-nple books, translated into local Joguages, sold at rock-bottom prices. 'Ir c\cn given to high schools. Every •■liiicse high school in Southeast \si;i "''ds (o have library copies of a book h *Cts Fouum News, October, 1956 on Free China, and an equally simple book on communism. If the right books are not available, they can be written. Ancl if the Communists are able to bribe their way into control of newspapers, why cannot the Free World subsidize' newspapers and publishers? Why cannot the United States, under cover ol a private organization, subsidize the one faltering, poorly-edited and starving anti-Communist newspaper in Singapore? Why cannot the same thing be done in Bangkok and Hong Kong before the press of these cities is lost? There are 370 privately-operated schools in Singapore, 400 in Malaya, over 100 in Indonesia, 210 in Burma, 600 in Hong Kong, others in Thailand, North Borneo. Why is it not possible for these schools, used to date as rallying grounds for Communists, to become instead rallying points for anti- Communists? It will require a little money lor organization; books, newspapers, and motion picture*! will be needed. But as Rodney Gilbert has pointed out, a fraction of the money we in- now giving to some of the neutrals xvill do the job. Several agencies of the United States government send visiting scholars and lecturers abroad. I have met them in a dozen countries. Ancl in general it appears that these men are Selected primarily on the basis of a lukewarm attitude about communism. I have been told, "We can't send a vigorously anti-Communist lecturer to India or Singiipore. It would cause all kinds of trouble." But if we are to save Asia, we must understand it is time to cause trouble, that there is a need for outstanding Americans with unequivocal views on communism instead of visiting professors of education. Some of the men might not last long in a few places, but before they receive their passports, they will have planted seeds, will have made young people think. The United States government currently has contracts with fifty-one American universities and colleges to carry on special education.il projects abroad. American professors are showing the South Koreans how to educate their children. In India, American teachers are teaching home economics. Elsewhere Americans are setting up engineering schools, teachers' colleges, and libraries. Granted that it is important to train engineers and mechanics, teachers and librarians, all this alone is not enough unless we can also help make people think, can open eyes to the evil that threatens to engulf nations. There are many American professors of political science, men of personality and deep convictions, who could go into the fog- ridden schools and colleges of South- east Asia and make young people think. Ancl before the growth of neutralism can be stopped, it will be necessary to remove the spirit of defeatism (Continued on page 55) Formosa's abundant food will impress Southeast Asians. Page 51
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