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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
File 048
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 048. 1956-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1587.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-10). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 048. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1587

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 048, 1956-10, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1587.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date October 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 048
Transcript i Subcommittee as being associated with the Communist apparatus. The State Department gave official recognition to the conference. Two months after the conference ended, Alger Hiss recommended that copies of the conference report be made available to each of the delegates at the UN conference. The influence of the IPR on American policy by no means ended with the conclusion of World War II. Publications of the IPR were almost the only ones on the Far East coming into the State Department. Alger Hiss became head of postwar planning for the State Department, and had access to every document, paper, and secret of the United States Government. Hiss' connection with the IPR was not a casual one. He left the State Department in February, 1947, to become president of the Carnegie- Endowment for International Peace. The following IPR personnel were active in postwar planning: Esther Brun- auer, Frank Coe, Lauchlin Currie, Harold Glasser, Alger Hiss, Philip Jessup, William T. Stone, and Harry Dexter White. The IPR not only influenced government policy directly, but also through the intermediary of Soviet agents. Beginning in the summer of 1945, Owen Lattimore anel John Carter Vincent helped steer American policy from support of the Chinese Nationalist Government, to a policy of treating the government and the Communist rebels equally. This policy led, of course, to ultimate military victory for the Communists. As late as the summer of 1945, such anti-Communists as Joseph Grew, Eugene Doornail, ancl Joseph Ballantine wielded considerable influence in the State Department's Far Eastern policy. By the fall of 1945, these men were replaced by Acheson ancl Vincent. The departure of the anti-Communists came after months of steady pressure against them by the IPR personnel anel the pro-Soviet ancl Communist press. From November, 1945, through 1946 ancl 1947, John Carter Vincent, as head of the Far Eastern Division, threw his weight against the Nationalists ancl in behalf of the Communists. A Vincent memorandum dated August 10. 1946. demanded that Chiang come to terms with the Communists. During this period, Philip Jessup opposed American aid to the Chinese Government against the rebels. In 1947 Israel Epstein (identified as a Communist agent) wrote a book called The Unfinished Revolution. Published by Little, Brown, ancl Company, it brazenly supported the Communist stand on China without reservations. On December 2.3, 1949, the State Department sent out a memorandum to all Far Eastern personnel emphasizing that' Formosa was unimportant, and that its fall to the Communists would be no serious matter. This came within three clays after a military report declared Formosa was of key importance to the defense of non-Communist Far Eastern areas. On January 5, 1950, President Truman announced the end of all aid to the Chinese Government on Formosa, ancl declared that Formosa should be returned to what he- called "China." Shortly before this, Senator H. Alexander Smith noted in his diary: "Lunch with Philip Jessup and Ray Fosdick. They are leaning toward the British who want to recognize Communist China." Of all the persons who led the IPR into a position of influencing the United States Government toward a favorable view of the Chinese Communists, Owen Lattimore stands out as the most important. The fact that Lattimore Page 46 knew Outer Mongolia to be Soviet-controlled at precisely the same time he described it as independent, ancl urged American recognition, was one of the facts which led the Subcommittee to conclude that Lattimore's several contradictions and memory lapses did not proceed from ignorance or confused thinking. Lattimore was unable to expLiin his meeting with Soviet Ambassador Oumansky on June 18, 1941, or his meeting with Soviet agent Rogoff in January, 1944, or his associations with G. C. Dolbin of the Soviet Foreign Office, ancl with General Feng Yusbiang, a paid Soviet agent. On July 17, 1949, Lattimore gave his famous recommendation for American policy in Korea: "The thing to do is to let South Korea fall but not let it look as though we pushed it." For 1952, the Rockefeller foundation allotted $.50,000 to the- IPR. As late as October, 1949, Lattimore and Rosinger were invited by the State Department to give their advice on China. In the winter of 1949-1950, the- Rockefeller Foundation paid Lawrence Rosinger $2,000 to enable- him to attend an IPR conference at New Delhi, India, where the sessions were primarily devoted to vicious attacks upon the United States. The same Rockefeller Foundation granted him $6,000 to write the book. State of Asia, published by Knopf under the auspices of the IPR, in 1951- On January 29. 1952. Lawrence Rosinger re-fused to say whether or not he was a Communist, when questioned by the- McCarran committee. This refusal came alter he was positively identified as a Communist by three witnesses under sworn testimony. The story of the Institute of Pacific Relations, anel the disastrous influence' it has had on the United States ancl freedom in Asia, is one of the most unhappy in our history- THAT OLD DEVIL: PEACEFUL COEXISTENCE The most important question which we must answer, in order to come to some conclusion as to what our policy should be against Soviel Communism, is this: Is peaceful coexistence between the free world anel the Soviet Union possible? Stalin repeatedly asserted that true peace- cannot be achieved until a world USSR is established. The essence of the Soviet "peace policy" is that wars — both cold and hot— must be- incessantly waged until all non-Soviet states are destroyed. Soviet tactics have alternated between the frontal assault ancl the united front, but Soviet strategy remains constant! the doctrine of permanent wars ancl revolutions until all non-Soviet states are eliminated. No serious or open- minded student ol Soviet behavior can deny this Soviet intention. No matter what our views may be — the Kremlin wants war; no matter how much we wanted peace in 1939 and 1941, Hitler and Tojo wanted war. It takes two to make peace, and only one to make war. If emr opponent has decided that he is at war with us, then then- is war, n" matter how much we may want peace, beat our breast, and sign peace petitions. Stalin wanted war; xve wanted peace. The result? Korea. Some Americans, who do not wish to be bothered, comfortingly assert: "Time is on our side." Has, in fact, tin"' been on our side? In 1945, we had an atomic monopoly- Today, we no longer have that monopoly. We have give" (he Soviet Union time to build up a stockpile- of decis-V* weapons. Another problem: Which is more important in over-a" strategy, Europe or Asia? The answer most frequently Facts Fouum News, October, 195"
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