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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
File 047
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 047. 1956-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1586.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-10). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 047. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1586

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 047, 1956-10, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1586.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date October 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 047
Transcript ~*«*-A55taBfc^ ^^^^^^ss\ Chiang Kai-shek. On June 18, 1941, while the Hitler- Stalin pact and the Japanese-Soviet alliance were still in force. Carter and Lattimore had a two-hour luncheon with the Soviet Ambassador, Oumansky. When questioned, neither Lattimore nor Carter could give the Subcommittee a satisfactory explanation as to why they should confer with the- ambassador of a country that was in alliance with both Germany and Japan — the latter China's immediate enemy — both countries also being aligned against America's allies. Lauchlin Currie, a presidential foreign-affairs adviser and IPR intimate, was responsible for Lattimore's getting the appointment to Chungking. In November, 1941. war anel peace hung in the balance in the Pacific. Lattimore, Currie. and Richard Sorge (the Soxiet agent) made every effort to deflect Japanese aggression away from Russia and toward other targets. Sorge was attached to the German Embassy in Tokyo. His Communist assistants in the Soviet spy ring included Hotsumi Ozaki, an advisor to the Japanese premier, and Kinkazu Saionji. Saionji had been the Japanese IPR chief, ancl Ozaki had been active in IPR xeork. Also in the Sen iet espionage group were Guenther Stein ancl Agnes Smedley. Lattimore arrived in Chungking during these fateful days ol 1911 as personal representative of President Roosevelt. On November 2.5, Lattimore wired Currie. at the White House, urging that no deal be made with Japan regarding China. He specifically demanded that America not let Japan "escape military defeat through diplomatic Victor) ." At the same time, Currie ancl Harry Dexter White, then Under Secretary of the Treasury, urged Currie to apply pressure to prevent any agreement with Japan. Elizabeth Bentley later testified that both Currie ancl White aided her in her work for Soviet Military Intelligence. Whittaker Chambers corroborated her testimony as it related to White. Alter Pearl Harbor, Lauchlin Currie- remained as executive assistant to the President and special adviser on Far Eastern affairs. Lattimore returned from China in Febru- ■'ry. 1942. and use-el a desk in Currie's office in the State Department Building; thereafter, for four months or so, Latfimore had a White House telephone extension, took care of Currie's highly sensitive ancl important mail, and Used White House stationery for correspondence. Lat- Hmore, incidentally, made extensive efforts to conceal this telationship throughout his testimony to the Subcommittee, ;|s he hail successfully done earlier, before the Tydings Subcommittee. Currie, from his vantage post next to the President, helped the IPR to influence American police in Import of Conununist aims in China. He- arranged a conference in October. 1912. between Sumner Welles, then Under Secretary of State, and Earl Browder, American Communist leader. The result was a communique implying Bquality between the- Chinese Government and the Chi- n<'si- Communists. This communique was printed in full in the Daily Worker (Oct. 10. 1942). and gave considerable prestige to the Chinese Communists for the first time. Meanwhile Frederick V. Field temporarily left the IPR '" become an officer of the Comintern-led American Peace Mobilization. This was during the Hitler-Stalin pact. In February, 1942, Carter and Currie almost succeeded in "blaming lor Pie-Id a commission in Army Intelligence las a Par East expert].0 'ED.'s MOTE: Field seas rejected lor this post (according to Life Magazine, July 23, 1951 I because la- I!iiii1ee-iI liis security test. There- f'1-''r. tl,,- e: nmist Party evas his career. •''.< is Forum News, October, 1956 During 1942. two other IPR stalwarts found their way into key government posts: Michael Greenberg. who had succeeded Lattimore as editor of the IPR publication Public Affairs, was appointed to a position with the Board of Economic Warfare, and moved into Currie's White House office; and Professor John K. Fairbank of Harvard, who became head of tbe China Division of the OW1. working under Lattimore: Fairbank also used Lauchlin Currie's White House mailing address. [Both Greenberg and Fairbank were proved Soviet sympathizers.] "Many persons in and around the IPR, in particular Edward C. Carter, Frederick V. Field, T. A. Bisson, Lawrence K. Rosinger, and Maxwell S. Stewart, knowinglx and deliberately used the language of books and articles they wrote or edited in an attempt to influence the American public by means of the pro-Communist or pro-Soviet content of such writings," was one of the conclusions of the Senate Committee. Bisson, an editor of Amerasia, also eelite-el its predecessor, China Today, together with Field. Bisson later taught political science at the University of California at Berkeley. John S. Service and John P. Davies, both connected xvith the IPR, influenced American policy decisively from their China posts. In June, 1944, Service advised sending arms direct to the Communists. On November 15, Davies recommended "a coalition Chinese Government in which the Communists find a satisfactory place." The mission of Vice President Henry Wallace to China, in 1944, resulted in a further net gain for the Communists. With Wallace, on the mission, were Professor Hazard of Columbia, John Carter Vincent, and Oxven Lattimore. The result was a Wallace report to President Roosevelt decrying Chiang Kai-shek, attacking Chiang's opposition to the Communists, ancl demanding that Chiang come to terms with the Soviet Union. After Wallace's return from China he published a book entitled Soviet Asia Mission, mostly written by Andrew Steiger, identified as a Communist, and writer for the Daily Worker. The IPR also published a Wallace pamphlet called Our Job in the Pacific, which was energetically propagated by American Communists, ancl sold in their bookstores as a guide to correct thinking on the Far East. NO HALF-MEASURES FOR IPR During the years 1944 anel 1945, Lattimore was alter- nately adviser to Chiang Kai-shek, associate of Lauchlin Currie, companion to Wallace, official of the OWI, and finally member of the Pauley Reparations Mission to Japan. Lattimore's book, Solution in Asia, published in February. 1945, paid glowing tribute to the Chinese Communists as progressive, democratic, and desirable. He also stated that the Soviet Union stands for democracy "because it stands for strategic security, economic prosperity, technological progress, miraculous medicine, free education, equality of opportunity, and democracy: a powerful combination." Advance copies of the Lattimore book were sent to Gromyko ancl a host of other Soviet officials. In January, 1945, the IPR held a high-level conference at Hot Springs, Virginia, to which top-government policymakers were invited. Raymond Dennett, a leading IPR official at the time, described the conference as a trial balloon for the UN conference at San Francisco. Delegates to the conference were recommended by Philip Jessup anel Lauchlin Currie. Of thirty recommendations made by Jessup, ten were later described by witnesses before the Page 45
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