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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
File 046
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 046. 1956-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1585.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-10). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 046. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1585

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 046, 1956-10, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1585.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date October 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 046
Transcript -. problem effectively. Among these efforts have been the Alien Registration Act of 1940 (the Smith Act), the Internal Security Act of 19.50 (McCarran Act), the Federal Loyalty Program; and such state actions as the Feinberg Law in New York and the Levering Law in California, both of which attempt to deal with Communists in education. On July 20, 1948, twelve men were indicted for conspiracy to organize the Communist Party of the United States, an association of people "who teach and advocate the overthrow and destruction of the United States Government by force and violence." The twelve were the Politburo of the American Communist Party: William Z. Foster, Eugene Dennis, John B. Williamson, Benjamin J. Davis, Jr., Jacob Stachel, Robert G. Thompson, Henry Winston, Joseph Gates, Irving Potash, Gilbert Green, Carl Winter, and Gus Hall. Foster was shortly thereafter separated from the trial because of illness. The starting point of the conspiracy was placed at April 1, 1945, when the American Communist Party, on instructions from Moscow, abandoned its wartime policy of supporting the Roosevelt Administration and reverted to its long-term revolutionary doctrine of class war and violent overthrow of American "imperialism." The trial was one of the longest in American criminal history." The government presented evidence for forty days. The defense used up ninety-eight days. Evidence against the Communists came from their own actions and their own publications. The documentary evidence of insurrectionary intent was abundant; the writings of Lenin, Stalin, and Foster, and the programs of the Comintern were replete with calls for mass action, culminating in armed uprisings to destroy "capitalism" and "imperialism." FBI agents within the party testified to many instances of Communist preparation for armed conflict. The Communist leaders, testifying in their own self- defense, were trapped, under cross-examination, in myriad inconsistencies ancl lies and forced to admit their advocacy of armed uprisings — the very crime with which they were charged. The jury convicted the eleven defendants, and the Supreme Court ultimately upheld the Smith Act. The Internal Security Act of 19.50, popularly known as the McCarran Act, forces Communist and Communist- controlled organizations to register with the Attorney General of the United States; it prohibits Communists from holding any nonelective office or employment in the United States [Government] ancl from holding jobs in defense plants. It seeks to prevent any officer or employee of the United States from aiding or contributing to the Communist Party, and would have all Communist and Communist-controlled literature properly labeled anel identified. In time of war, the Act would intern Communist Party members. A Subversive Activities Control Board was established to determine which organizations xvere Communist-controlled. The cases of Klaus Fuchs, Alger Hiss, ancl the Smith Act trials indicated the seriousness of the Soviet conspiracy and the necessity of intelligent and effective counter- measures by the United States Government ancl its citizenry. The Institute of Pacific Relations was established in "ED.'s NOTE: Facts Forum News, October, 1955, contains Judge Medina's inside story of the trial of the eleven Communists, hs-cn'n- ning on page 38; also a picture of the eleven top-ranking Communist leaders in the United States during their conspiracy trial in \'i ev York City. Page 44 1925 apparently to study and discuss impartially the problems of the- Pacific, its islands, anel the countries bordering its shores, especially in Asia. Branches of the Institute were founded in the United States, Britain, France, Japan, China, the Soviet Union, and several other countries. Most of the financial support came from the American branch — largely from the Rockefeller anel Carnegie Foundations, a number of leading American corporations, anel several wealthy patrons, notably Frederick V. Field.'"' A CASE HISTORY OF COMMUNIST INFLUENCE ON FAR EASTERN POLICY For many years the IPR practically monopolized thc study of the Far East and Pacific problems. The United States Gox-ernment, researchers, ancl the mass media [i.e., radio, television, motion pictures, the press] sought ancl obtained advice anel information from the- Institute. On July 2, 1952, the Internal Security Subcommittee <■ the Senate Judiciary Committee reported its findings on the IPR ancl its relation to subversion and internal security. This followed an eighteen-month study of IPR files ancl publications, and testimony from sixty-six witnesses. Among the conclusions of the Subcommittee were the billowing: The IPR, its officials anel staff members, were either Communists or pro-Communists, and instruments ol Communist policy, propaganda, and military intelligence. Owe" Lattimore was. from some time iu tbe 1930's, a conscious. articulate instrument of the Seiviet conspiracy. Leadership of the IPR worked with persons in government involved I in the determination of foreign policy, and exerted substantial influence on United States Far Eastern policies. ancl to orient them toward Communist objectives. According to the Senate Committee, Edward C. Carter the first secretary-general of the IPR. tried as early as 192" to effect a relationship between the IPR anel tbe Conununist International. Carter enjoyed the closest personal relationship with important Soviet officials, lie described Ear' Rrowder, former secretary of the American Communis- Party, as "100 per cent American." Not only did IPR ol"' cials who testified avoid mentioning the names of their Soe iet friends who asked for anel received data on American security in the Pacific, but they also carefully avoided mentioning the role played in IPR affairs by their Japanes* colleagues, Ilotsumi Ozaki ancl Kinkazu Daionji. These men were participants in the spy ring of Richard SorgeT — a spy ring which helped deflect Japanese aggnssiu" away from Russia toward the United States. In the summer of 1941, Edward C. Carter was secretary- general of the Institute, and Fred Field was picketing tne White House as executive secretary of the Communis*' front American Peace Mobilization. Lattimore was leaviffl his post as editor of the- IPR publication, Pacific Affiliate, become, on President Roosevelt's nomination, adviser** "ED.'s NOTE: Frederick Vanderbilt Field, Harvard gradual* 1927; later studied in England under Harold Laski; inherited Ieii.ii"'' ot approximately S2 million; i.s descended from Samual Osgood, H** V. S. postmaster general; Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt Field, who laid the transatlantic cable; William II. Vanderbilt, raj" road magnate; and William li. Osgood Field, his father, a I'. S. am" officer in World War I. This scion of a renowned family is -" avowed and active Communist. fED.'s NOTE: For stoi*y »it the Sorge spy ring, si-<- t-ondensat** ol Major Charle-s A. WJHoughby *s book, Shanghai Conspiracy, in March, 1956 issue of Facts Forum News. il"' Facts Forum News, October, 19& *'A
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