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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
File 045
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 045. 1956-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1584.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-10). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 045. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1584

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 045, 1956-10, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1584.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date October 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 045
Transcript ■el to press iss, details the State stions they ; answers, ve known ed George Chambers. Imitted he :1 not as a Chambers' , Abt, and Dommittee Communist might be -Vugust 27. Washington 'ers asked lave which lists in the s immedi-j r pages in tten docu- ypewriter. imaries of nent mes- f inaction, for lack of nsel Strip- of events, ibers then "pumpkin photostat nuts from lards. The ess it pro- ■ould con- i first trial ed in the n denying ent docu- : that Hiss x-1-jiiry, as urity were en able to industry1 y Depart- A herded' ,vei in the the most t, bis par- lership at annals oi ius Fuchs i Hiss Case. i, published her, 1956 c-ass- was more important than all other atomic espionage efforts by the Soviet Government. The key contact in this spy ring was Harry (add, Philadelphia research chemist. He served as courier between Dr. Klaus Fuchs, British physicist, ancl Soviet officials in the transmission of atomic- energy data, and to him Fuchs entrusted the priceless information he gathered in his three- years of participation in the most closely-guarded of all American military projects. Fuchs, who hael been on hand when the first test explosion of the atomic bomb took place, returned to Britain, continued to spy for Russia until 1947, ancl subsequently was convicted of espionage. Gold, Sobell, ancl the Rosenbergs were convicted of treason in 1951, anel the Rosenbergs were sentenced to death. The Soviet Government's espionage, sabotage, and infiltration system in the United States was greatly facilitated by the fact that there were, in mid-1952, 407 Soviet officials m tin- United States with complete freedom of movement. These included 87 Soviet Embassy personnel, 58 Soxiet ' \ representatives, eight Tass news-agency personnel, five members of tbe Amtorg trade agency, 134 wives of Soviet officials, ancl 113 children of Soviet officials. Reporters for nussia's news organizations enjoyed all of the privileges "muted American newsmen [in the United States, not in Rlissia]. Russia had complete access to the flood of official Information that poured into Washington. COMMUNISTS IN THE UNITED NATIONS Evidence came to light in the fall of 1952 indicating that Communists in the UN were using that organization as a rcady-made means of tunneling a massive amount ol information about the United States back to Russia — especially ''Iter the beginning of the Korean war. Agents from Russia, Czechoslovakia, and Poland, as employees of the xx-orld Organization, face no surveillance of the type Americans 'lee- in Communist countries. They are free to travel anywhere in the United States. They can talk to anyone. They °an communicate- with Moscow by secret code, with no Suestions asked. They can travel back ancl forth between New York and their home capitals freely, carrying secret ■ocuments or equipment with impunity. If one i.s caught r,'d-hande-d eeith American documents, as was Valentin *»ubitchev, he can count on merely being sent home, his Passas-c- paid by the UN. The Senate Internal Security Subcommittee- investigating Ntoimunism in the UN turned up many Americans with No-Communist backgrounds, or who were described as Communists by witnesses in sworn testimony, or who refused to answer questions put to them as to whether or "ot they were Communists. Frank Coe, who had played :i role in the Communist-influenced Institute of Pacific Relations, held a $15,500 tax-free job as secretary of the '■■ternational Monetary Fund. Coe, described by witnesses *•> a Conununist. not only refused to say whether or not he 'v-is a Communist, but refused to say whether or not he was spying on the United States Government. The Fund fcnissed Coe from his job. Other Americans who refused to answer whether or not ftey were Communists were Alfred Van Tassel, operations ''"<-< tor for the Technical Assistance Administration; Joel *0rdon, an officer eif the- Division of Economic Stability ;'"d Development; Frank C. Bancroft, editor of the docu- Nnts-control section: Stanley Graze, a member of the Far '-•i-st t,-clinical assistance program (who came to the UN *Vts Forum News, October, 1956 from the State- Department); anel Eugene Wallach, a reporter at the UN, who refused to testify concerning evi- dence linking him with the Nexv York State Communist Partv-. "ACADEMIC FREEDOM" In Stalin's Foundations of Leninism, which he wrote in 1924, he described "cultural ancl educational organizations" as valuable allies in the Soviet advance toward world dictatorship. The tactical period of the united front in America, which began near the end of 1934, also saw the beginning of the most intense Soviet efforts to bore into America's colleges, universities, high schools, ancl grammar schools. This effort was considerably facilitated by curious American conceptions of "academic freedom." which indignantly opposed having Fascist or Ku TClux Klan ideas taught, while- simultaneously insisting that communism be presented without taking siele-s. ancl that Communists could teach without harm to the community and the country. The American Communist in charge of penetrating education, the motion pictures, and mass media generally, was V. J. Jerome. Some American professors have not only influenced thousands of their students xvith uncritical comments on the Soviet "experiment" anel attacks upon American "toughness" toward the "peaceful" Soxiet Union, but actually aided Communist sedition schools, such as the Jefferson School of Social Science in New York, and the California Labor School of San Francisco. Professor Dirk Struik of Massachusetts Institute of Technology taught in secret Parte- schools in the Boston area; Professor Joseph Cohen, alias Clark, of Brooklyn College, became a writer for the- Daily Worker: Professor Samuel Sillen of New York Uni- versity served on the Communist cultural commission, which directed infiltration of schools, colleges, the press, radio, anel television; Professor Albert Blumberg left Johns Hopkins University to become- district leader of the Communist Party in Maryland.0 The tendency was to ridicule anti-Communist professors as bitten with "hysteria," while simultaneously defending pro-Communist professors in tbe name of "academic freedom." Some professors were more zealous fighting "Mc- Carthyism" than they were speaking out against Soviet tyranny. One of these appeared on a television program in early 1953. At a moment when the cameras brought him so close that one- could almost look down his throat, he was shouting: "It's getting to be- that a man can't open bis mouth in this country!" [Every] Communist teacher has taken the following pledge: "I pledge myself to remain at all times a vigilant and firm defender of the Leninist line of the Party, the only line that insures the triumph of Soxiet power in the United States." (Daily Worker. April 2. 1936.) U. S. EFFORTS AT SELF-PROTECTION In view of the mass of evidence of Communist infiltration into government, education, unions, radio, motion pictures, ancl elsewhere, several efforts have been made by the United States Goxernment and the states to meet the "KD.'s NOTE: Albert Blumberg is mentioned as "the shrewdest Communist ;ige-nt in the Teachers Federation," by Bella V. Dodd. See- Iiet hook. School (»/ Darkness, in condensed form, Facts Forum News, September, 1956. Page 43
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