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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
File 039
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 039. 1956-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1578.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-10). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 039. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1578

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 039, 1956-10, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1578.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date October 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 039
Transcript shirt, that the Soviet Union would still propagandize the return to the rest of the world. "They do not tell the- true story—certainly not in countries where they control the propaganda means," he said. They elo not te-ll of the evidence that it was a forced return." Mr. Doherty, too, commented on the fact that proving this in the I nited States would not provide proof to the Russian anel satellite peoples. "When the sailors returned to Mos- cow, they made exactly the sort of statement that was dreamed up for them," he saiel. Remaining Seamen Defy Ambassador Zaroubin "As Mr. Hurleigh points out," Mr. Morris explained, "by doing this, we only repaired some eif the damage. But We eliel give heart to the others, for subsequently, when the four seamen vvho are still here were called in. anel it was demanded of them by no less a personality than Ambassaelor Zaroubin bimself thai tine return to the Soviel f nion. the-y tolel him, in effect, to go tei (SIC) — that thee- were going to stay "i the United Slates." Mr. Hurleigh asked if Mr. Morris had any information regarding whether the Voice of America anel other means at our disposal got as much of that store- out to the world ;i*- possible. "The- VOA is broadcasting this story all over the world, I presume, with a great deal of effect," replied Mr. Morris. Mr. Larsen asked if the- new attitude "I smiles anel international friendship being assumed by the- Russians could he related to the- high level of espionage iii this country. "Do you feel," he- asked, "that this pose of friendship is •* mask for continued high espionage* 111 this country ancl among the anti- Communist forces?" "Oh. most certainly it is," Mr. Mor- r,s stateel emphatically, "because, for Instance, you will notice that the intelligence activity operations are proceeding with greater force than ever. •"id we see evidence here of bolder Action on the part of intelligence "gents." Is that having its effect on Anu-ri- c'il|i public opinion bv allaying fears "' espionage perhaps?" asked Mr. Lar- S<'|| "Do you see that happening in «-is country?" very, very definitely. I think that *<3 are being lulled to sleep," replied ' Ir, Morris. "On the one hand, I am able to perceive a growing sense of alarm among extremely well-informed persons in Washington who have- access to the real underlying facts of our position regarding the Soviet Union. They seem to feel, anel in some cases have expressed the opinion in a confidential way, that our situation is very, very perilous indeed, and that they view with great alarm the growing ascendancy of Soviet power, both air power and political power, all over the world." "Does this mean a growing tendency to go underground in this country?" inquired Mr. Larsen. "Is one of the results less emphasis on the overt acts of communism as a political, theo- retical political party in this country, anel more underground activities?" "Well, no," Mr. Morris corrected. "I believe you have a conflict there. The intelligence organizations are very sensitive to actions anel reactions. For instance, after the decision on the Nelson case by the Supreme Court, and the subsequent nullification of various states' activities, the attorneys genera] of the various states involved said that individual Communist agents became bolder and bolder. On the other hand, no generalization is possible, for in connection with some particular investigation that we are con- ducting of activities of the Soviet Del- egation in the United States, I presume that after the spotlight has been turned on them — even while the Communists in Massachusetts are getting bolder — they themselves are becoming more quiescent." conduit for passing along information to Soviet intelligence. The information which he obtained, for instance, in the public relations field, or perhaps in connection with government work. Mr. Morris pointed out, might be much more valuable than any which could be obtained by a particular Soxiet spy operating on an individual basis, some of whom have appeared before the Subcommittee. "Ordinarily, however," Mr. Morris said, "a full-fledged Soviet agent would be more valuable, because he is dealing directly with the Soviet apparatus." Referring to J. Edgar Hoover's statement that there were more than twenty thousand hard-core Communists among the 165 million people in this country, Mr. Doherty asked how many Communists in Mr. Morris's estimation were here. Soviet Agents Not Counted In Hoover's Estimate Red Reservoir Mr. Larsen asked if there was any difference between a Soviet espionage agent and an average member of the Communist Parte in the United States. "There is a difference-." explained Mr. Morris. "You always have, among the Communist Party membership, a reservoir for intelligence and espionage activities. You have to be awfully careful not to jump from that to the conclusion that every Communist Party member is an actual, knowing espionage agent." "Judge Morris, as a matter of fact, aren't the Soviet agents a far worse danger to us than a bunch of American Communists?" asked Mr. Doherty. To this, Mr. Morris again replied that no generalization was possible, since a Communist in a well-placed position, carrying out his Communist Party assignment, might serve as a ''\> is Forum News, October, 1956 "Well, that is an almost impossible question," re-plied Mr. Morris, "but apart from those twenty-two thousand, Mr. Hoover mentioned that there- were probably ten times that number of Communist sympathizers ancl fellow- travelers. Also operating independently you have a large number of Soviet agents. I suppose only the head of the Secret Police in Moscow could give the e-xac-t number - but we do know, from all the evidence that is available to us, that the number is rather extensive." Mr. Hurleigh wanted to know if it had been made cle-ar that sometimes the Soviet agent was not a member of the Communist Party, anel therefore had not been included in counting the so-called hard-core- Communist Party membership, to which Mr. Morris replied that current hearings are bringing this out. In clarification, Mr. Morris explained, "Very often, once a person begins to get into some sort of important Soviet assignment, the first action is that he is taken out of the Communist Party and given instructions not to read the Daily Worker and not to associate with his former Communist friends." Mi. Larsen asked to what extent the Subcommittee or the FBI had tapped the big reservoir of former Communists who know all about the apparatus and the workings, but who may (Continued on page 55) Page 37
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