Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
File 036
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 036. 1956-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1575.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-10). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 036. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1575

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 036, 1956-10, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1575.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date October 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 036
Transcript Soviet Espionage in the U. S. A. "Soviet espionage in the United States today is more extensive than I believe anyone realizes," warns Judge Robert Morris, Chief Counsel of the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee. A recognized authority on the subject, Judge Morris stresses in this interview the value of our congressional committees in exposing to public view information which is vital to continued freedom. wiiek WEEiEi.n pnen-o \r "What success has the Committee had in wresting information on subversive activities from recent witnesses?" "How does America guard against subversion?" "Should the Communist Party be outlawed in this country?" Mn. Morris, a recent guest of Reporters' Roundup Radio program, was barrage-el with these and other challenging epie'stions by \ t-teran newsmen Jack Doherty, of the New York Daily News, and Douglas Larsen, of tbe Newspaper Enterprise Association. Moderator Robert F. Hurleigh, Mutual commentator and director of Washington Operations for Mutual Broadcasting System skillfully guided the discussion, reepiesting further clarification when necessary. As pointed out by Mr. Hurleigh, congressional committees have been studying the problems and dangers from subversion of communism for some twenty years. Yet each new investigation reveals skillful communistic infiltration anel naive opposition by many in this country to the dangers from subversion. Mr. Hurleigh paid tribute to Mr. Morris's recognized position as one of the foremost anti-Communist investigators in the United States. A naval counter-intelligence officer during World War II. Mr. Morris later, during 1953 and 1954, serve-el as Chief Counsel of the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee, and was Judge ol the- Municipal Court in New Yeirk until his return in January, 1956, to the position of Chief Counsel of the Washington subcommittee. In this capacity beheads the current Senate investigations into the- scope of Soviet activity in the United States, anel the dangers from subversion. Opening the questioning, Mr. Larsen asked, "Mr. Morris, are- U. S. laws governing espionage in this country strong enough? Do they do the trick?" Convictions Set Aside "That is precisely what the Subcommittee is looking into now." replied Mr. Morris. "As you know, we have walking the streets today many people who epiite obviously have been established to be Communist agents — and even Soviet agents. Without mentioning too many particular cases, there have been some very important ones in New York City wherein the jury founel the particular witness guilty. Cemvictions, however, have often been set aside on legal grounds of some- kinel. I have one case in minel in which the appellate court judge declared that there was no doubt that the- defendant was guilty; however, because of a Page 34 technicality it was necessary to declare her to be free. We- are examining such cases as this to finel out whether there can be any tightening up of the internal security laws." Askeel by Mr. Larsen if there was hope- of ge-tting immediate corrective legislation as a result of the Subcommittee's hearings, Mr. Morris indicated that there was a definite hope that this might be accomplished. "For instance-," he- explained, "we brought to the surface- just recently a condition that exists in the country today which is being exploited by the Soviet Union as well as by Soviet intelligence. "As a result of the unfortunate decisions maelei at Yalta," he pointed out, "there are- refugees here in the United States, variously estimated as between twenty and forty thousand people, living under false papers. The Communists are finding out who these people arc and threatening them with exposure to the immigration authorities unless they elo their particular bieleling. Legislation Will Abolish Threat "That poses a definite- threat to the security of the- country," he- continued, "anel the Internal Security Subecommit- tee will launch a thorough investigation into the- situation. Legislation is also being prepared which will rem- e-ely the dangers involved." Facts Forum News, October, 1956
File Name uhlib_1352973_v005_n010_036.jpg