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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
File 029
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 029. 1956-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1568.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-10). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 029. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1568

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 029, 1956-10, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1568.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date October 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 029
Transcript Let's Not Get Complacent By J. ADDINGTON WAGNER FROM THE GREAT he American Legion and its Na- P°nal Commander have arrived at the flowing evaluation of the recent Pevelopments in Russia, the signifi- Pnce of the- 20th Congress of the r>mmunist Party in Moscow anel the ["dress of Nikita Khrushchev on Feb- fHary 21. 1956. In substance, Khrushchev's address intained three basic parts: 1. The denunciation of Stalin and the- cult of one-man rule. 2. The- idea that it is no longer necessary for the Communists to resort to civil revolt, force, and warfare to accomplish their goals; rather, these can be accomplished by parliamentary persuasion and ballots. 3. The contention that the new collective regime in Russia wants to be friendly with the United States. Khrushchev in publicly denouncing , a*in and the creed of one-man elic- P°rship took a calculated risk. He S|<1'<1 provoking unrest, uprisings, and ^n open rebellion by the- followers Stalin within the Soviet Union anel cllite countries. Against this risk he ^ have balanced the knowledge N ultimate control of the situation |*ted with the Red Army, and the ^ ief that the army leaders would be i a^n more solidly into the net of col- , **ve dictatorship because of their I -jr-il resentment of one-man dicta- P'-ip. He must have reasoned also J;* within the Soviet Union there j, re followers of Stalin who disagreed U^Sonally but not in principle with I* Khrushchev group and who seiught **j»e power for themselves. Finally, C*<-Ts Forum News, October. 1956 lie must have reckoned that in the minds of people throughout most of the world, terrorism and brutality and suppression of freedom were linked with the name of Stalin and the Stalin regime. It is logical to assume that Khrushchev concluded the odds favored the new strategy. He aimed at two vital objectives - internally, the elimination e>f any practical opportunity for Stalin's followers to oust his own group; and externally, an increase in sympathy and support of the present Soviet leaders on the part of uncommitted and non-Communist peoples who would be led to believe that Khrushchev and his confederates were J. Addington Wagner of Battle Creek, Michigan, National Commander of the American Legion, 1955-56. An attorney by profession, he served as National Vice Commander of the Legion for 7952-53, and as chairman of the Legion's Americanism Commission for 1953-54. A graduate of Washington-Lee University Law School, Mr. Wagner served as assistant attorney general of the state of Michigan, 1940-41. opposed to the terrorism of Stalin but had been powerless to do anything about it. Recent reactions of leaders in some non-Communist nations would indicate that Khrushchev's move was well- conceived. Soviet leaders have good reason to feel elated over their successes since World War II. They have seen millions of people in vast areas of the earth enveloped in the silent darkness behind the Iron and Bamboo Curtains. In recent months they have derived further satisfaction from the visit of Khrushchev anel Bulganin to India anel other nations of the East. They count as gains for their side the current turmoil in the Middle East, the trend toward neutralism ancl popular fronts in Greece anel Italy, anel recent Communist successes in France. The announced emphasis upon parliamentary persuasion would appear to be an attempt to attract the non- Communists, Socialists, and other non- belligerent radicals and liberals to the side of communism against the common foe — capitalism. Such a shift might open a new avenue of deceit through which the Soviet leaders could use all of these groups, and pacifists as well, for the promotion of world communism. For example, the people of India, long committed to a policy of pacifism, might well be enlisted actively in the Communist fold by means of this device. It is likely- that this also represents an attempt to divert attention from the new, complex, ancl subtle tactical line which is designed to carry communism into non-Communist nations through the back door rather than the front. It should be remembered that the Soviet spokesmen have not ruled out altogether the tactic of aggressive war anel civil revolt. They have merely stated it is not now necessary. Thev have not said that it may not become necessary in the future. Undoubtedly Khrushchev hopes that non-Communist nations will become complacent anel let the-ir guard clown. This new policy pronouncement does not really represent a change in Communist doctrine; the Communists have always indicated a preference for taking over nations by parliamentary intrigue ancl subterfuge. Where this cannot be done, historically they resort to force ancl violence anel warfare. The 20th Congress ancl Khrushchev's address may present a change in emphasis or (Continued on page 62) Page 27
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