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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
File 025
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 025. 1956-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1564.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-10). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 025. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1564

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 025, 1956-10, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1564.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date October 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 025
Transcript fits. And it says, in effect, to the 65- year or older needy World War I veteran: "You are not required to prove disability ancl unemployability. Just meet the recpjirements of limited or no income, length and type of war service." I need not point out of course that today private industry generally and even the government itself recognizes age 65 as the age for retirement. Opponents of our bill, including a few congressmen, certain government officials, and some segments of the press We charged that the American Legion favors older World War I veterans over service-connected disabled Feterans. This charge is without foundation. In the first place, the American Legion's record in the field of benefits 'Or disabled veterans and the survivors of deceased veterans is unequalled hy any other organization. Secondly, early in this session of Congress the American Legion te-stifie-el in support r|f essential increases in disability and "oath compensation benefits. In fact, uie increases now proposed in lulls Wore the House and the Veterans affairs Committee reflect almost exact- W the amounts we recommended ""mtlis ago. Third, ancl most important in this connection, the American -(■gioii supported amendments to our par Veterans Security Bill as reported °ut by the Veterans Affairs Committee *0 provide the-se increases. There's not *ne slightest justification for charging tne American Legion with being more p-cerned with older World War I Veterans than with the service-disabled 'Id survivors. *" Deserve Needed Benefits We are determined that each of Jhese individuals nil receive the *nefits which he needs ancl deserves. loere s no cpiestion of choosing among *em. All are entitled to needed bene- ts and our nation can well afford to r-"e lo,- all of them. -Much of the opposition to the War .eterans Security Bill stems directly °m the fantastic amounts of estimated costs which the government has ™t out for the first year, the- filth year, "•-I so on, up to the year two thou- •Kl. This is tlie scare technique . --'(-'h opponents to any benefit pro- "am sometimes invoke for the /'■pose of stopping or killing the pro- I sal. We have not seen much public- v On projected cost estimates of the j rvivors' bill which the government v°rs. One of the projections against Ac-Ts FonuM News, October. 1956 our bill, namely, the $148 billion is an estimated cumulative cost by the year two thousand. And this covers all provisions of the enlarged bill as reported by Veterans Affairs Committee on June 9, 1956. It does not pertain to the original bill nor to the one which finally passed the House. Time does not permit me to develop this subject of cost in the detailed manner which it deserves. I would urge the American people, however, to remember this. The American Legion's War Veterans Security Bill to grant needy World War I veterans a modest measure of security in then- declining years is in the nature- of emergency legislation. It is designed to do an immediate job for a segment of our population which is rapidly growing older, which is in need of help, and which cannot be taken care of bv existing government programs or by the type of benefits made available by private industry within the past few- years. The average World War II and Korea war veteran may not need veterans' pensions when he reaches'age 65 because he will benefit from social security ancl private industry retirement programs. Thus, the program we advocate now for World War I veterans is self- liquidating. It will have served its essential purpose within a few short years as a generation of Americans who defended our nation in World War I passes out of existence-. Congressman Olin Teague (D- Tex.), a veteran and Chairman of the Veterans Affairs Committee, gives his reasons for opposing the War Veterans Security Bill. . . . TiiisiiE are approximately twenty-two million veterans today. By 1985, according to the Census Bureau, we will have approximately 221 million people in our country with 110 million being either veterans, their families, or their de- pendents. This year we arc spending approximately two and a half billion dollars lor compensation anel pensions. And, according to the Veterans Administration, if our present laws are not changed, tin's amount will become five billion dollars within approximately forty years. Today we have approximately two million on compensation rolls, and 582,000 on pension rolls. We are adding 5,000 per month to tlie pension rolls. Now this means that within five years over a million veterans will be receiving either $66.00 or $78.00 per month in addition to their social security. Now, today, under existing law, any man with 90 (lavs honorable service, less than age 55, if he has a single permanent disability of 60 per cent or two or more permanent disabilities, one of which is 40 per cent in degree, combined with other permanent disabilities to a total of 70 per cent and who is unemployable, will receive $66.15. A man aged 55 who has a single permanent disability or a combination of permanent disabilities rated 60 per cent and unemployable will receive $66.00. At age 60, a man with a 50 per cent rating for single or two or more permanent disabilities and unemployable, will receive $66.00. At age 65, with a 10 per cent rating for single or two or more permanent disabilities ancl unemployable, a man with an income of less than $1400, if single, anel $2700, if married, will receive $7S.OO a month. Now, under the American Legion leaders' plan, a World War I veteran with only a short period of service — anel bear in mind that more than 365,000 World War I veterans bad less than six months service anel half did not go overseas — a veteran with only 90 days of service would be handed $90.00 a month, despite the fact that he may have nothing wrong with him and he may have a job or income of up to $2700 if married and $1400 if single. In other words, a veteran could have a combined income of $3780 a year from his pension and other sources, have nothing whatever wrong with him, anel have served 90 days or more and be called a "needs" case by the American Legion Bill. Now, I have objected to this kind of legislation, since nearly every dollar we put into non-service-connected pensions on such a liberal basis must come from the war-disabled veteran. Today a war veteran who suffered a serious disability in combat and is now (Continued on page 54) Page 23
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