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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
File 020
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 020. 1956-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1559.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-10). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 020. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1559

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 020, 1956-10, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1559.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date October 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 020
Transcript %>! (Continued from page 16) hensive about a program providing benefits for disabled people. He said he hael great faith in solutions obtained in the competitive free enterprise of today. Abilities, Inc., was organized by handicapped people almost four years ago. Their basic- principle was that they would accept no charity. Borrowing $8,000 from local citizens at interest, anel paying a prevailing wage, this unicpie organization began to compete for contracts in the electronics field. In its third year of operation Abilities, Inc., had grown to 169 employees, ancl its gross sales exceeded $600,000. It might be added that represented in its group of employees, all severely disabled, is every known static and progressive illness. It is estimate-el that 20 per cent of the employees could qualify for retirement anel also disability benefits. Some employees are as much as 82 years old.1-' ' Mr. Viscardi commented, further: I come- to indicate my apprehension that we may stigmatize tin- disabled hy this legislation; we may condone the ignorance anel the misunderstanding which exists; and we might then deprive millions of our citizens of thc right to know a productive lifs- and have tnem resigned to subsidy, which is not their heritage as Americans.'" There is a growing concern among authorities on the subject about emphasis being placed on continuing disability rather than on rehabilitation. The Task Force- He-port on the Handicapped, of the Office of Defense- Mobilization, in 1952, concluded: . . . The term "totally disabled" is a term we are today beginning to feel applies to very few people. . . . Any benefit which diminishes the incentive toward rehabilitation and self support is socially undesirable.17 Wayne B. Warrington, commissioner of the Arizona State Department of Public Welfare, pointed to the clangers involved in a disability benefits program. His opinion was that H. B. 7225 will do much to destroy the self-sufficiency of our citizenry. He cited, as a ease in point, a hypothetical man of the future who. at age 50, de- c-icle-s he has a physical impairment which will be of long duration. Inasmuch as he has, over .i period of many years, paid a considerable sum of his income to the federal government as Page 18 an "insurance premium," he may well feel that the government has a great deal of his money — money to which he is entitled.18 Senator Byrd stated that later disability benefits may doubtless be- paid for partial disability, and when the health of 70 million persons is dealt with, a vast field will be opened, one of such magnitude that no one can tell where it will end. He said that lie has seen many an aid program start at the mouse stage ancl grow to elephantine proportions. Se-nator Carl T. Curtis (B-Neb.), speaking in opposition to an amendment proposed by Senator George, had this to say: Whatever differences there are in the language of the George- Amendment -mil the disability provisions of ... H. R. 7225 an- uf ss-ry little consequence. Both proposals would put the United States government into tliE- business oi paying cash liE-riE-fits for physical disability. ... Il is a broad . . . step in the- fie-lel of social legislation. It may he- argued that this is a modest program. . . . Let no one he deceived by that approach. It is hut tin- beginning. . . .*• Senator Curtis went on to point out that legislation of short duration was not being dealt with; rather, the Social Security system had been set up to run in perpetuity, ancl future costs must be reckoned with — costs of from ten years to 100 years. He stated, further, that elective public office holders sometimes erred, in their ideas as to what their constituents wanted. He said that if it were possible- to get the mathematics of the proposition across to the majority of the people, doubtless the Social Security revision would have little support. Many forward-looking Americans — representing those both for anel against Social Security changes — realize that in addition to reckoning witli the hundreds of millions of dollars which will be the immediate cash outlay for a new, liberalized program, there must be considered, additionally, those persons who will go from doctor to doe-tor until they can secure the necessary medical evidence to support their disability claims.20 Opponents of the changes in the Social Security system warn that the people would do well to examine ALL changes in the round, pointing out that the new, revised program commits posterity. Anel, conceivably, it may be that posterity, busy with weightier problems of unemployment, inflation, and overpopulation, will be unable to pick up the tali for future liberal Social Security benefits. Also, critics claim, one should not lose sight of tbe fact that the value of the American dollar has long been on the wane, and that no matter what benefits are provided, doubtless they will lose value through the- years- thereby contributing to a most insecure security. At any rate someone will have to pay for the revised program. The "gimme" group and the "something* for-nothing" clique have not yet seemed to grasp the fact that sum'" body, somewhere, some time, will hav* to ante up the necessary wherewithal* That "somebody" is tbe taxpayer* his children, and his children's children. END ■ ihiii •■■Ibid. •■Ibid. "Ibid., p. 11885. "■Ibid., p. 11887. -■Ibid, p. 11870. % w-V-t (Continued from page 17) cerebral thrombosis. It accounts for perhaps ten per cent of disability cases. Then comes hypertension, or high blood pressure. Also, there is arthritis, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, ancl eaneer. All the-se diseases are easily determinable by doctors in so far as disability is concerned. Senator William Langer (R-N.D.) state-el that he had received letters from doctors who claim the door has been opened to socialized mediciB*? He saiel that he- eliel not agree wi"1 them." Senator Walter I". George (D' Ga.), speaking iu this respect als°- saiel it was bis personal conviction tM the eloor to socialized medicine ha" not been opened. He stated, furtbC ... So long as we- retain our present freeze system and our free- economy! socialized medicine can be brought iot° this country only by the doe-tors tlu-iH' selves. Someone should have the coura|$' to say to tlii-in that if they continue tl' make trifling objections, they may inviW Something had. . . . The doctors alone i-1" "84 Congresswnal lli;nr,l t 1956), ie. 11H.17. Facts I-'oium News, October, 19$ 6'flio
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