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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
File 019
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 019. 1956-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1558.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-10). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 019. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1558

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 019, 1956-10, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1558.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date October 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript CAN SECURITY BE GUARANTEED? Ifett (Continued from page 15) Speaking in regard to this, stated: I have ... a higher opinion of the medical profession than many of its' official representatives. I believe that the overwhelming majority of the doctors of the country are scrupulously honest in the-ir diagnosis. I do not believe them to be venal, and I will defend their characters and their professional integrity against the implications which have been leveled against them. . . .' Senator Douglas remarked that representatives of the American Medical Association seemed to have the idea that doctors will be the men who pass °n whether a claimant receives benefits. Such is not the case, for the doctors will merely furnish medical information to a state board. This board *ill then make tlie final determination *fter analyzing both medical anel other "formation. In this way the doctors Will be under little pressure, which is °ne eif tlie principal objections of the Association, for the doctor will be Soiriew hat of a consultant rather than a state functionary. disabled Will Be Checked Since the objections charging Palingering and impediment of rehabilitation are somewhat closely allied, they may be considered together. For one thing, a person elraw- "■g benefits for being disabled is not assured that he will continue to draw s"ch benefits indefinitely. He- will be flecked. And, if he appears to be negating opportunities lor improvement, ls situation can be reassessed. As for rehabilitation, competent Ndical opinion reveals that not more han 2.5 per cent of the disabled who 're older than fifty years can be pstored to self-support. Senator Leh- No slated that he served for many Nrs on the Labor and Public- Wel- **re Committee, and had had much e!tperience with rehabilitation. He Jtated that testimony was given before r*e Committee to the effect that there Is a backlog of two million cases of Podicapped people in the United ;-ates, and that the- number is being Pded to by at least 250,000 each year. Peanwhile, onlv 50,000 or so are being pttbilitated. Senator Lehman state-el that testimony froiri |jje Department of Health, '''"cation, and Welfare, ancl from b *<-•« FortUM News, October, 1956 members of his own staff, revealed that for every dollar spent in rehabilitation, five dollars was returned to the country by enabling the person to be self-supporting ancl thus assume bis share of the tax burden.8 Advocates of the Social Security amendment admit that since President Eisenhower signed thc bill into law, there is, understandably enough, a need to finance the extra benefits; so it will be necessary for Social Security taxes to be raised by about $850 million annually, beginning January 1, 1957. Benefits Cheap at the Price As for the objection to the high cost of the measures included in the Social Security amendment, it has been point- eel out by proponents that the over-all benefits derived will be cheap at the price. Senator Bttssell B. Long (D- La.) stated that when the costs were actually worked out, he believed that a person would be paying approximately seventy-five cents each month to insure against disability, and that his employer would be paying a similar amount. Senator Long stated that tlie idea of preserving a man's pride — by having him pay for the insurance which he receives later — appealed to him. He pointed out, however, that the man in the upper brackets, salary-wise, will receive the smallest percentage return with regard to the- amount he- paid. For example, the- man who earns $4,200 or more each year will receive disability payments of about thirty-one per cent of his earnings. On the other hand a person earning $100 each month will receive about fifty-five per cent of his earnings." Senator Douglas stated that not only would the amendment be insurance — it would be social insurance. His opinion was that in social insurance it is possible to have some sharing of benefits and some allocation of costs, whereas this is not possible in private insurance. He made the following statement: Sees ial security is good for everyone in insist circumstances. lis broader effect is lit give a greater proportionate benefit to iIieese- who are most in need, on the Christian principle' of "Share ye with one an- othei your bursle-ns."10 Senator Long, calling attention to the vigorous opposition from a number of sources, stated that he had in mind, specifically, the American Medical Association. He mentioned that it had been only a year ago when a spokesman for the Association had asked the legislature to pass a bill giving doctors a tax deduction which would help in insuring themselves against disability. Senator Long stated: In other words the doctor recognizes that if he should go blind, for instance, he could not continue- his practice as a doctor. So they came before the- committee and asked for a tax deduction. Ms>st doctors are in a relatively high income-tax bracket. If we had adopted that proposal, it would have meant that Uncle- Sam was picking up about fifty per cent of the cheek. . . .** "The- working man wants what tbe doctors want," said Long. "If it is good enough for the doctors, it should be- good enough for the working man. "'- Additionally, President of AFL-CIO George Meany denounced the American Medical Association for "false and malicious" attacks on the Social Security bill. The AMA's campaign against the disability part of the bill, according to Meany, "violates the humane traditions of medical practice and brings discredit to the spokesmen of a profession sworn to the good of the sick." Meany stated that tlie bill contained "adequate sale-guards against chiseling." and added that it was "shocking to hear spokesmen for an organization which professes the highest ethical standards accuse its own members of a willingness to engage in conspiracies to defraud the government. "Labor." saiel Meany, "apparently has more faith in the integrity of the indvidual physician than does the AMA."13 (lis Are Determinable Those who defend the new Social Security revision state that while it is true that many psychosomatic ills will be difficult to determine, there are- multitudinous ills which are easily determinable. Take, for example. arteriosclerosis. This is a thickening of the walls of tbe arteries, and it accounts for over fifteen per cent of disability cases. Then again there is paralysis, or (Continued on page 18) ■Ibid. nud. 'Ibid., p. 9604. ">/wa. "Ibid. 'Jlbid. "AFL-CIO News, January 28, 1956. Page 17
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