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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
File 018
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 018. 1956-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1557.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-10). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 018. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1557

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 018, 1956-10, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1557.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date October 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 018
Transcript CAN SECURITY BE GUARANTEED? 7Uf (Continued horn page 14) abuse-proof. Moreover, it has been extremely difficult to define total disability. For example, a person may be physically disabled, but still capable of making economic contributions, as well as social ones. Too, he may be disabled in one capacity, but not disabled in another — for instance, disabled as a machinist, but not disabled as a watchman. Disability, then, is a relative matter. Again, a person may be a clever malingerer — dedicated to exploiting the government. There is much evidence to the effect that disability rises anel falls with the prosperity cycle. In times of recession disability figures run high. Also, who would attempt to define the disability status of a married woman, disabled for outside employment, but perfectly capable of doing housework at home?" Medics Disapprove Senator Byrd stated that eminent physicians and surgeons have appeared before* the Senate Finance Committee in regard to Social Security. Doctor F. J. L. Blasingname, representing the American Medical Association, testified that the medical profession was concerned because they may lie placed in the roles of policemen, stating that the majority of his profession felt that the determination of disability would be both hazardous ancl difficult. For example, there will be the individual, faced with the- prospect of either receiving or not receiving a disability benefit — depending on the doctor's "verdict" — who may develop a neurosis as completely disabling as an actual pathological condition.9 Doctor Elmer Hess, President eif the American Medical Association, in a letter to Senator Byrd on May 25, 1956. told of the growing concern of doctors everywhere over the new legislation. Doctor Hess wrote that the Senate Finance Committee had, after two months of careful hearings, listened to over 100 witnesses, which included main- well-qualified persons, anel that those- people- testified against the- disability factor in the Social Security bill. Under the definition in H. B. 7225, Page f6 a program of disability benefits will be all but impossible to administer, averred Doctor Hess. He wrote: . . . The problem of determining whether anel to what E-\ts-iit .s person is disabled involves not only physical ailments and handicaps, but also insula] and emotional factors, including such intangibles as character, will power, and personal motivation. Many persons with severe handicaps, including paraplegics, multiple amputees, and the blind, are making their wav ees self-sufficient individuals. On the other hand many persons with far le-ss serious impairments, hut without the will tE> work, would welcome early pensions at the expense of the taxpayers.'" It has been proposed that the positive approach to disability is rehabilitation rather than cash benefits, for Alex Alazraki, with more than a dozen men in his charge at Abilities, Inc., was born with only holt arms and hall legs. Married qnd self-sufficient-, Alex drives his own car with controls he designed himself. anything less than rehabilitation is in reality not humanitarian. The disabled person really needs the incentive and dignity of a productive occupation, not pension ancl pity. Not only will a dole retard a rehabilitation program, but it will have an adverse effect psychologically." It is a matter of record that the country is presently making great progress in rehabilitating the disabled through programs already in effect. Such programs are federal anel state aid under 1950 amendments to the Social Security Act, workmen's compensation, Vocational Rehabilitation Act, private insurance plans, Veterans' Administration rehabilitation services, etc. It is generally conceded, among foes of the Social Security revision, that it would be feasible- to follow ancl subsequently improve pre-existing programs rather than to inaugurate a new venture which might prove dangerously unpredictable. Doctor Hess, in his letter to Senator Byrd, pointed out that if a disability benefit became a statutory rigns pressures for further liberalization ol Social Security might prove irn-sist- ible. He wrote that many supporters ot II. B. 7225 had made clear that their aim was to have disability benefits ;" any age. Using this as a precedent. tW door would be open for a rash of welfare proposals which might change the entire philosophy of the Act.12 System Endangered Informed persons state that in I'-j actuarial sense there is no reliable- and factual information on the main proW lems of rehabilitation ancl disability Therefore, it necessarily follows th»' it would be all but impossible to ;"" rive at a cost for such a program. Pr°' viding benefits to cover every possiW need might necessitate such a tax bur' ele-n that the structure of the entire Social Security system could be e"' dangered. One aspect of the amendment is Unit may do much to discourage rchabi'1' tation of disabled citizens. One HenD Viscardi. testifying before the Senate Finance Committee, was especial'! impressive in this respect. Mr. *'s careli is president of a remarkable C°» ecru. Abilities, Inc., of Long Island- ^ New York. This organization was established and is being run by Pe'' sons considered permanently a°j totally disabled.18 Mr. Viscardi's o**j sensitive description of his disabil' - is as follows: I was born a crippled child, horrib'l deformed, with no lower limbs, and I sps'" the first se-se-ii years of my life, consecutn71 scars, in oiie- hospital. And when I was a child, I reiiH-iol'1' asking my mother, "Why, ine?" And sli told me that it was time for anotb* crippled boy to he lierrn into the worK*1 tlis- Lord and his counselors liE-ld a me-''. ing to decide wlu-re he should hs- ss-nt, n'1' the Lord saiel, "I think that the Vise.a'1'j would be a good family for a cripi"' boy."" Mr. Viscardi, testifying be-fore ''' committee, stated that he was apP*j (Continued on page * •Md., p. 11863. ■Ibid "•Ibid. "Ihul. '-Ibid. lliid.,p. 11864. "Ibid. Facts Fohum News, October. 1& speakii I has cal pro fesenta 'ng ma are sen I do ni •vill el- profess tions \ them. . Sena fesenta Associ-i that elo On whe fits. Sin tors wi ■nation m tlie after ai •nform- will he- one of P*socia soine-wl a state °isablt I Sine J&alinj •ehabil allied, Sether. "•g bei ^sured •Uch be Pteckee feting ***s situ As f( Pedica tfian 2," are ok Ntoree "■an st; J^irs o 'are- C< '•'-Perie **ted t !*-eCoi Sdic- '--ates, Ned t Meanw Niabili Sena >y f: Wucal *CTS
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