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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
File 017
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 017. 1956-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1556.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-10). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 017. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1556

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 017, 1956-10, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1556.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date October 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 017
Transcript CAN SECURITY BE GUARANTEED? Abilities, Inc. for companies be so all' , however- t (R-Utab) ent: I also be- bled. But I is eithe-r to irinciples or 1 solve the VIie-ii a siif [liis ameno- out of foil' in ever that ition. . . • Ini.-nt does I (D-Va.). States Se"1' irance co'"' ble exper*' insuran<* ses of mil- id, fur** 'ram wo'1'1 e\perii'"° a busing this wool' er the- i»'vl be subsb'11' i when *■'' e to pay '' t that it I"'1- 3 a feder* i would & 1 on page •" 1, 19S6. jCf the l)i -11"','. lay 18. l'J56' p. 11853- tuber, 1& tye*! (Continued from page 13) Senator Herbert H. Lehman (D- N.Y.) stated that he preferred to see an amendment which lowered ihe retirement age of women to 60; however, he was willing to accept 62. Senator Olin D. Johnston (D-S.C.) conferred, stating that he had favored the age of 60 as a retirement basis for Women, but that lie was willing to accept 62. The consensus among proponents of the amendment seemed to he that the age of 60 was a better retirement age for women, due to their difficulty in finding employment, but mat he and other legislators were will- •ng to "go along with" the 62-year 'imitation as an improvement over the "5-year previous limitation.2 Perhaps the greatest storm of protests from foes of the Social Security amendment has resulted because of the disability benefits. This i.s the focal Point of the many criticisms of the lew system. Defenders of the amendment maintain that the hardships of total anel long-continueel disability are worse 'han those of old age. The reason for his is that the aged usually have ac- piniulated more of a reserve; also, "■any of them have retained, in part, an ability to earn. Tbe totally disabled Japiclly exhaust what little- re-serve they 'a\'e accumulated, if any, because of nuir long-continued inability to work and because of the medical care anel I c°sts with which they must need I fe<-'kon. **9is/afors Compromise Misfortune is no respecter of age, ^ay advocates of the revised Social ecurity system. A person may be ."lick clown early in life, before he has , a<l an opportunity to accumulate any lnd of cash reserve. For tin's reason *>any legislators are in favor of paying '■sability benefits at any age: however, ?ey have compromised thus far on ff 130-year-old limitation in II. B. Senator Paul II. Douglas (D-lll.) r'nted out that disability benefits will p Paid as a right, not as a gratuity. * this way the recipient will avoid /*e humiliating stigma attached to Reiving what might otherwise be arity. Under this program the dis- Acrs Forum News, October. 1956 ablcel person will receive aid before he is destitute, so that he and his dependents can be spared such worry ancl hardship.8 In effect the amendment will replace assistance with insurance. Senator Douglas stated that the American people wanted self- respecting insurance rather than public relief. Senator Douglas pointed out that as the new system begins to cover more and more people over a period WIDE ss-.iii li paoro Senator Paul H. Douglas I D-lll.I stated that the American people wonted self-respecting insurance rather than public relief. of time, the taxpayers of the nation will be helped directly because, in lieu of the welfare-assistance payments currently being paid to the disabled, such people will begin to receive insurance benefits instead.4 Senator Lehman stated that there has been an argument raised over the proposal to pay disability insurance at a certain age. He said he found this hard to understand, for many insurance companies practice this, even though the insured is younger than 65 years of age. As for this being something new or socialistic, he maintained that such things had been practiced by insurance companies as far back at he could remember.11 The principal objections to insurance against disability are approximately four in number, according to Senator Douglas. The first objection is that medical determination of the degree of disability will be extremely difficult, thus placing an undue strain on doctors; also, that this will lead to abuses. Second, the very nature of the benefit will invite malingering on the part of those who long for the certainty of a benefit cheek rather than a facing of the uncertainty of a competitive world. Third, the payment of benefits will hinder the rehabilitation of the disabled. Fourth, it has been charged that the program will cost too much. Proponents of the Social Security amendment refute the first objection by pointing out that the determination of disability has been and is being made in hundreds of thousands of cases — for example, those in federal employ, veterans, and those employed by private companies. Many of these have been adjudged disabled and have been drawing benefits. Almost half a million people are getting disability benefits from publicly-administered funds: thousands are being paid under private plans: and. additionally, workmen's compensation for industrial accidents creates a large caseload. So it would seem that the objection regarding the difficulty of disability determination is a relatively minor one. Mr. Nelson H. Cruikshank, director of tlie Department of Social Securitv, AFL-CIO, remarked: Persons who say that the government cannot administer a disability program apparently shut their eyes to the fact that it is [already] administering a number of such programs.,; As for the objection relative to malingering (opponents of the amendment claim that there is both a subjective ancl an objective factor in disability), some people develop psychosomatic ailments which may disable them, it is true. These people may, in all sincerity, believe themselves afflicted with nondiagnosable ills such as headaches, backaches, e*tc. The question arises, then, whether a doctor would certify applicants as being disabled when, in actuality, they may not be. It has been pointed out that if doctors do not certify them, the doctors may acquire a reputation for being "tough," and may lose many patients. Meanwhile, the patients would beat a path to the door of those doctors who handed out disability papers wholesale. Senator Douglas, (Continued on page 17) ■Ibid, p. 11888. 'Ibid., p. 9601. •Ibid., p. 9606. -■Ibid. "Ibid., p. 9602. Page 15
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