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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
File 013
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 013. 1956-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1552.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-10). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 013. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1552

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 013, 1956-10, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1552.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date October 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript ;hta ia indicate! foreign ai» arefer dired , should b« doubt tho1 -sion to th« at "recogn1' dozen othe China. question- I nelia's thiol quite a M Ambassael"'' ; recogni that he ha' his qui"-'1'" a philosop-'' ts own vo'1 -onstitutioi-' hta. "It M 10 censorsh'P itional opP*r planning r," he co* ' to prevej he comi"("r British Ce"r did. I nmonweal' leaders b*1 t we be-li'''1 rinciples ' ■ma it we V vVI here-fore, ; in any it philoseil" 1 the si a's propose "Mr. Anil'1' 'ctober, dloi Stevenson, Henry Cabot- Lodge, Jr., U. S. Ambassador to United Nations, Lester B. Pearson, Radian Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, and French Foreign Minister Christian Pineau I left 0 right1, all of whom, according to Gaganvihori L. Mehta, Ambassador of India to the United States, ,y°r channeling of foreign oid through United Nations. Christian Pineau, visiting here in June, 1956, r9ed U. S. to lead the West in a new, friendlier policy toward Russia. tio- i„, sj>dor, I would like to come around to J"e forthcoming visit of your Prime Minister, Pandit Nehru," he said. "rhat specifically do you expect him "■ take up when he visits this country?" Xou know, Mr. Lindley, Mr. Nehru ^as invited last year by President Eis- fchower, as far back as last August , so," explained Ambassador Mehta, and he- was unable to come. When J*1-- Dulles, Secretary of State, visited ^ew Delhi, he repeated this invitation ""•u expressed particularly thc Presi- pnt's desire that Mr. Nehru should jlie here and meet him. This is neit ^r- Nehru's first visit. He was in this >ntry in 1949. He is coming at the Imitation of President Eisenhower to ^ve an informal and friendly talk j th him on various common prob- ."■s, on a survey of the international Nation." , *»nibassador Mehta stated that a eart-to-heart talk, or a meeting of ■ads was what was hoped for, inditing that Prime Minister Nehru was 3 coming specifically to ask for any- 'nR, or to bargain over any pro- pals. ., It is really a question of surveying /!f whole picture of several problems rjjjch affect both the countries," he |!j*nniarized. "That does not mean that . eV will necessarily agree on every Sue, but if they can understand one Pother a little bctter, I think it is Kable." Mr. Lindley requested information .S'lrding which problems would be ls°Ussed by President Eisenhower "■"l Prime Minister Nehru. Embassador Mehta stressed that in . Plying he was, of course, only guess- 8- "I don't think that any specific Jenda has been formulated," he said. t, "t, for example, take this shift in v'ct policy. You know, our Prime AcTs Forum News, October, 1956 Minister went to Soviet Russia last year. He has certain views as to what this shift in policy means." Mr. Mehta indicated that this, and also the admission of [Red] China to the United Nations, would be discussed, predicting that President Eisenhower ancl Prime Minister Nehru would discuss not only Indian opinion regarding the admission of [Red] China to the United Nations, but also of Burma, Indonesia, Ceylon, ancl Pakistan. One of the areas of discussion, in his opinion, would be the feelings of various countries in that region in regard to China ancl the whole problem in the Far East. [It will be noted that throughout this interview, Ambassador Mehta referred, not to "Red China" or "Communist China," but rather simply to "China," or the "Peiping government."] He pointed out that Pakistan, to whom this country gives military aid, is having trade negotiations with Soviet Russia. "Their Prime Minister was to visit Peiping recently," he pointed out. "He has twice cancelled his visit because of ill health." It was implied that although the United States does not wish to recognize Red China and does not agree that Red China should be granted United Nations membership, Pakistan, to whom the U. S. sends military aid, is on terms of considerably more friendliness with the Soviets and with Red China's Peiping government. "Then also," he continued, "there are several other questions which have a bearing on India's economic development which will be discussed. So I think it is really a survey, or an across the table' discussion. The whole idea has been that it should be completely informal, stripped of any diplomatic formalities and so on. They will get together probably outside Washington, and meet alone for several hours." Mr. Lucas asked Ambassador Mehta's opinion of the relations between India and the United States at the present time. "Has there been improvement, or have relations deteriorated?" he inquired. "It isn't exhibited often that there is any ill feeling at all," replied Ambassador Mehta, explaining that he was not saying this simply for the sake of formality or courtesy, and that the same thing applied both to India and to the United States. "I have been in this country nearly (Continued on page 52) WIDE WORLD PHOTO India's Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru is greeted by Konrad Adenauer, Chancellor of West Germany, at Bonn Airport, July 13, 1956. Nehru assailed U. S. foreign policy in speech made at Bonn. Page 11
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