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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
File 012
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 012. 1956-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1551.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-10). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 012. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1551

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 012, 1956-10, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1551.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date October 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript ... REPORTERS' ROUNDUP INTERVIEW OF HIS EXCELLENCY Gaganvihari L. Mehtd Ambassador of India to the United States This official spokesman for Prime Minister Nehru of India indicate- that the United States is not winning friends through its foreign a'" policies. India, according to Ambassador Mehta, would prefer direct aid in the form of loans. Other aid, he emphasizes, should b* channeled through the United Nations, removing any doubt thd "strings" of foreign control are attached. Ambassador Mehta states that Red China's admission to th' United Nations is not urged by India alone. He feels that "recogi"' tion of facts" is necessary, pointing out that at least a dozen othe' countries have recognized the Peiping government of China. RENI PHOTOS As official spokesman for Prime l\ Minister Nehru of India, His J- *.Excellency, G. L. Mehta, Ambassador of India to the United States, interviewed on a recent Reporters' Roundup program, was questioned by veteran reporters Ernest K. Lindley of Newsweek magazine, Lyle Wilson of United Press, and Jim Lucas, of Scripps-Howard Newspapers. Moderator Robert F, Hurleigh, Mutual commentator and Director of Washington Operations for Mutual Broadcasting System, outlined Ambassador Mehta's long and distinguished career in business ancl public life. Before his present diplomatic appointment in September, 1952, Ambassador Mehta was a member of the Planning Commission of India, and Chairman of the- Tariff Commission. He was bom in Bombay in 19(X), and was educated at the University of Bombay and the London School of Economics. Mr. Wilson opened the questioning, bringing into immediate focus a subject which is uppermost in the minds eif Americans whe-re the Far East is concerned. "Mr. Ambassador, will the Indian government persist in urging the admission of Communist China into the United Nations?" "It is not a question of the Indian government persisting only," replied Ambassador Mehta. "There are today in the United Nations a number of Page 10 countries which have recognized the Peiping government. Indeed, some of your allies, among whom are the British government, have not only recognized them, but want freer trade with China. France also wants freer trade with China. The first country which recognized China (the Peiping government) so far as I know, was Burma. Then India and the British came next. There are several countries which feel that recognition of facts is necessary for a settlement of questions in the Far East. That does not mean that we approve or disapprove of the policies of a particular country, or of that regime. Indeed, there are many countries in the United Nations whose structure of government — of the way it came about or its policies — your government, and our government also, disapprove." [Ambassador Mehta's reply ignored the fact that only one government of a country is recognized by the United Nations. Nationalist China would be disqualified for United Nations membership by recognition of the Communist faction as the true representatives of China.] Mr. Lucas said, "Mr. Ambassador, one of the things most vexing in this country is that your people seem to feel there is little choice between us and communism — that they are equally good or equally bad, and we feel that there is considerable more merit on our side of the question. Is that a fair statement of India's thin-*' ing and policy? "I am afraid that is not quite a i$ statement," corrected the Ambassaduj "Are you referring to this recogniti"" of China, or a general . . ." Mr. Lucas explained that he h-1' no reference to China — his questi"' concerned communism as a philosopW or an ideology. "Well, India has, by its own vo*] tion, got a democratic constitutions replied Ambassador Mehta. "It h* free elections. It has had no censors'11" of the press. It has constitutional opp"' sition functioning. "Even our economic planning ' democratic in character," he co' tinned. "There is nothing to prev-e* us from going out of the conuu"' wealth of nations — the British Co^1 monwealth — just as Burma did. ** are completely free. But we h"v remained within the Commonweal' We have said, and our leaders h'1' said, time ancl again, that we bt-li''* in the fundamental principles democracy. "There is no question, therefore, explained, "of India being in any "'; committed to a Communist philosop' or ideology. M of Prime Minister Nehru's prop"5 visit to the United States. "Mr. Amb-1 J1""! Stev '■"lodian I"''slit >, , '"or chon »'9ed U. S -*»dor, I *e fort Kjnistei What s to take try?" "You ' *as invi enhowei ? so," ( and he {•r. Dul Hdc and exp ■*«nt"s el kne he P- Nel >ntrv Pitatic Pve ai Ni hi, S, or Slt"atio, , Amba Nrt-to Kds v ^ng tl com r. Lindley introduced the subH -f nc*a 'rime Minister Nehru's movo&m ,s ut, fe Viet Facts Forum News, October, W Ads F 'nil IS- < •"-sals. ti."U is ?,e w**<- *Wh . Nmar S wi -He, b, '••other "*irab] Mr. I 'Nardil Wcusse a"dPri, AlTlb;] Kin, V "I
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