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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
File 011
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 011. 1956-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1550.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-10). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 011. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1550

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 011, 1956-10, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1550.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date October 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript WIDE WOULD PHOTO Excavations going on in the Culebra Cut in 1913, one year before the completion of construction on the Panama Canal. Note the huge rock formations that had to be dynamited through to permit the digging of the canal. IT STARTED BACK IN 1904 .. . The Panama Canal was built with the blood, sweat, and tears of people from many nations. The saga of the tremendous odds encountered in its Construction still inspires us today, Dearly half a century later. Untold thousands of laborers, pick and shovel wielders, section hands, and engineers toiled for many years in the steaming jungles of Panama to build the canal. During the- late 1870's, the French engineer, Ferdinand de Lesseps, fresh from his triumph in successfully building the Suez Canal, headed a French company given permission by the Republic of Colombia to dig a canal through the- 1 sth s of Panama. He soon found out that he had bitten oil more than he could handle with the Panama Canal Project. His Suez Canal, a beautiful piece <>f engineering work up to that time, g("-s through Bat land only. While the weather is hot in Egypt, the climate is not particularly unhealthy, and workmen could be hired from the neighboring inhabitants. . In Panama, tropical conditions prevail. During the- rains season, vegetation grows up almost in a night, and drainage is difficult. Moreover, the region was extremely unliealllifiil, and mane men engaged on tin- work died or became seriously ill from the dreaded yellow fever for which there was no cure- at that lime-. . . . Hocks had to be dynamited, Mountains had to be dug through. Needless to say, the first attempt to get the natives of the district to continue work on the canal was unsuccessful. De Lesseps finally had to admit defeat, and the- work on the canal was abandoned for several years. Meanwhile, in the U. S., there- was mounting interest in the canal. A growing need existed for a shorter water highway between East anel West coasts. Much time and money were lost because ships had to take- the long, laud route around the. tip of South America. Finally, after much discussion, the French company was bought out for $40 million, and the U. S. took over the building of the canal in 1904. Though the actual work in digging the canal was staggering, far surpassing anything of the sort that had ever heen accomplished before, the work of the U. S. Army Medical Corps in making the isthmus healthful and in taking care of a vast legion of laborers was an even greater feat. Activities in the region were virtually paralyzed by yellow fever. After several courageous American soldiers volunteered to subject themselves as human guinea pigs to the bite of mosquitoes, it was proven beyond a shadow of a doubl that a particular kind of mosquito was the carrier of the deadly tropical dis ease-. Immediately the- Medical Corps swung into action. A large sanitary force detachment under orders from Dr. W, C. Gorgas, installed a system of sewage in the Panamanian cities of Colon and Panama. His orders to pave the streets were carried out, preventing the collection of heaps of garbage anel stagnant water in which mosejuitoes breeded. They kept the undergrowth cut down along the canal and sprayed the ditches with crude oil. thus killing the young mosquitoes. As a result, yellow fever has become almost unknown. Before any actual work was done further on the canal. nearly two and hall years was spent in making the region healthful and safe from tropical disease. Immediate construction began then and the canal was finally completed in 1914. If today we would truly value the achievements wrought in the Canal Zone, we should keep ever fresh in our hearts and minds how gallantly the forces of death were- faced and conquered, the difficulties of construction overcome, anel the equipment, provisioning, and housing of "an army in Ihe field" organized. The names of the engineers Coethals. Caillard. and Stevens and of Dr. Gorgas and others who worked on this great canal, have been added to the list of those- who valiant]) served their country and more than their own country — the whole world. l> *C-Ts Foin \i News, October. I95(i Page 9
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