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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
File 006
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 006. 1956-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1545.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-10). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 006. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1545

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956 - File 006, 1956-10, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1609/show/1545.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 10, October 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date October 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • Energy & Sustainability Research Collection
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript ■ we fine! the enemy holding the trumps. But our hands are not tie-el in Asia. There is action that can be taken, particularly if the seating of Reel China is defeated this year and we- have a year of grace. Ancl as important as it is to block this move, it is equally important to develop positive action, to provide an antidote for the poison of Red neutralism. While- all the nations of Asia are involved in the struggle that lies ahead, it can be properly evaluated only if the historical importance of the overseas Chinese is understood. These are the 12-million-odd Chinese who live, neither on Formosa nor in Red China, but are scattered in vast com- ni11 nities and isolated farms all through Asia from Hong Kong southward. It is against these Chinese that the Communists have directed their programs of propaganda and terrorism. It is among these Chinese that the Heels have made most progress. And it is by understanding how this has been accomplished that the Free World may be able to block the further expansion of communism in Asia. Industrious Character of Chinese For centuries the Chint*se from the two south coastal provinces of Fukien and Kwangtung have been adventurers and seafarers. In the tenth century South China junks penetrated as far east as the Arabian and Red Seas. The native populations of Southeast Asia, made up of Malays and numerous aboriginal tribes, have never been known for industry or business acumen. It was the immigrant Chinese, some-times merely exploring, or peer- Page 4 haps escaping from a revolution in China, or moving because of flood or famine, who began the development of the area. When the British began to develop Singapore in the early nineteenth century, they sent recruiters northward to find Chinese. When the Rajah Brooke on Sarawak wanted to develop his little kingdom in the jungles of Borneo, he found a Chinese who had been resident for some years, and sent him back home to the Fukien coast to get colonists. When the Buddhist leaders of Thailand wished to build a great city of gleaming temples in Bangkok, they sent to China, and Chinese artisans did the job. Anil thus it is that there are 893,000 Chinese among Singapore's present population of 1,100,000. In Sarawak there are 260,000 Chinese, making up nearly 30 per cent of the total population, and in complete control of business life. Altoge-ther there- are- 12,5(X),000 overseas Chinese. Nearly 50 per cent of the population of the Federated Malay States is Chinese; there are three million Chinese in Indonesia, one million in Viet-Nam, and three million in Thailand. Of Hong Kong's 2,400,000 people. 2,225.000 are Chinese. All through Asia, from the borders of China southward through India and eastward to Burma, the Chinese control business; they publish Chinese language newspapers, operate Chinese language schools, and worship in Chinese language churches. Industry Plus Wealth Equals Jealousy Human nature being what it is, native peoples were freejuently jealous of the industrious and frequently wealthy Chinese. And even though frequently invited to settle in Southeast Asia, the overseas Chinese was often discriminated against. In British- controlled areas there was no schooling provided for the overseas Chinese for many years. In British Sarawak there was no high school at all until 1948! Very few Chinese cared to attend the British-operated public schools which, to this day, base- a curriculum aimed at preparing a youth to pass the Cambridge examinations. Children in Malaya, North Borneo anel Singapore- study the same fairy tales and children's tales read by British children. In geography they learn the names of all the members of the commonwealth Free China is now producing much of its own fertilizer. and colonies. In a part of the world where snow is never seen, children read about snow and ice skating. Thus, not being assimilated in 1 *'s adopted country, the overseas Chines1' has always looked north to China. TM old-style families want their children to go back to China, at least for a visit- And the old folks want to be buried i" the good earth of China. Unable- '■' properly educate their children in 'I"' few schools provided by the British Dutch, French, and Thais, the Chines'' communities began to establish the'* own schools. The Revolution of 1911' 12 in China, overthrowing the Maiic'i" throne and establishing a republic- gave the overseas Chinese new prid* in their homeland, anel gave tremendous impetus to education and thf establishment of Chinese languaj? newspapers. It is only natural that the oversea* Chinese have always looked to Chin* Discriminated against by the British Dutch, ancl French rulers of Southea-" Asia, they were forced to keep the1' home ties, and were forced to educn"' their children as Chinese children- Red Campaign Bars No Holds The Chinese Communists, \v*1 moved into Southeast Asia even bef°r they had defeated the National-!**] for over a decade have cleverly a". thoroughly exploited the overseas CD nese. No holds have been barred this Red campaign. The Reels h--'', moved swiftly to control the ChiO-'J language press, to infiltrate the iic'ar: 1.8(H) Chinese schools, and to establ-^ control of labor unions in pre-di'"1 nantly Chinese Singapore. They I'-'1 Facts Foiu'm News, October, $ Car
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