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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 10, April 10, 1931
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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 10, April 10, 1931 - File 001. April 10, 1931. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/94/show/90.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 10, 1931). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 10, April 10, 1931 - File 001. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/94/show/90

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 10, April 10, 1931 - File 001, April 10, 1931, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/94/show/90.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 10, April 10, 1931
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 10, April 10, 1931
Contributor
  • Kendall, Everett
Date April 10, 1931
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THE COUGAR Published by the Journalism Students of the Houston Junior College Welcome Westminster College HOUSTON, TEXAS, FRIDAY, APRIL 10, 1931 VISITING TEAMS DEBATING FREE TRADE QUESTION Westminster and H. J. C. Meet In Scheduled Contest of T. J. C. P. S. A. BOTH BOYS AND GIRLS Drenkle and Cafcalas Meet Girls and Hamberger and Jones Meet Boys BULLETIN Just hefore the Cougar went to press, a report came in that the following changes had been made in debate plans: Westminster Junior College girls' team is unable to be here today, April 10, and forfeits the district championship in the girls' division to H. J. C Westminster's boys' team will debate the H. J. C. boys' team in the music room on the first floor at 9:30 p.m. Elizabeth Sinclair, member of the H J. C. girls' team, is sick with the mumps. Adele Drenkle and Lucille Caf- (Continued on Page 3) FIREMAN HURT AS ROOF FALLS Burning Home Near College Furnishes Excitement March 24 HJC STUDENT NARROWLY ESCAPES SERIOUS INJURY WHEN HOME IS BURNED "That's the nearest I ever came to meeting the grim reaper." These were the words of Archie Irwin, H. J. C. student, in speaking of his recent narrow escape from a fire which burned his home. Archie and his brother, Kenneth. were sleeping on the third floor of the house when they were awakened by someone calling to them, Archie arose from his bed, opened the door,, and then was met by a burst of flame which burned his face and singed hi; hair. The escape by the stairs being cut off from the boys, their only hope seemed to be through the window beneath which was the roof of a small garage. As no time was to be lost, both boys crawled through the window and, hanging from the ledge a moment, let themselves drop to the roof of the garage. The roof was so old that it collapsed with the weight of the boys, carrying them downward, so that they were badly bruised and their clothing Because of their experience it necessary for both the boys to spend the remainder of the night in the Melhodist hospital. The following morning they were able to go to their home in Teague, Texas. Kenneth Irwin is a student this year at the Houston Dental College. Archie is now back at school, having recovered from his injuries. MANY NEW BOOKS ARRIVE FOR LIBRARY ELIZABETH DICKENSON Elizabeth Dickenson, whose frequent piano programs over KTLC include both popular ant! ■classical numbers. Miss Dickenson is a student at the Houston Junior College and is heard regularly. She formerly was a resident of Bryan, during which she was heard over WTAW at College Station. H. J. C. ORATORS PLACE SECOND AMERICAN PEOPLE PAUSE TO HONOR AND RESPECT, GREAT COACH ROCKNE The passing of Knute Rockne has greatly affected the students of Houston Junior College as it has stirred the hearts of the nation. A most beloved man as well as an athlete was Knute Rockne, the hero of children, the friend of lovers of clean sportsmanship the world over. "I can tell you lots about him; he ■as one of the finest men I have ever known," said Ed Duggan, football coach at Sam- Houston High School, when interviewed by a student reporter. And so it goes throughout the nation, for there was not a man acquainted with the work or life of Knute Rockne who does not admire and respect him. It was Rockne's idea that athletic sports not only develop students physically, but make them better able to meet life's problems. He said that every boy at Notre Dame who wished would be allowed to get out and play in the athletic games. It is no wonder that among his students he was able to select and develop teams that were able to win spectacular victories. With the passing of this great i the world has lost a fine citizen; the world of football has lost a coach who can never be replaced in the hearts of those who knew him. Students should be interested to enow that many of their wants have Being present at a fire hefore the arrival of the fire department w thrilling experience of many H. J. C, students on Tuesday night, March 24, when the J. C. Foster home, located near the college, was badly damaged ^en answered in the form of a new , e I supply of books received here last While watching the burning building j week- I a student saw the blazing roof timbers A™ng them are to be found some of sway outward while directly beneath j the most up-to-date e meyer, central station, resolutely climbed upward with a fire hose, aiU Willie UllCLLij' ucutruLii ... - . -, , TS ladder Fireman O. B. Bake- I Chemistry, Physics, and Education. For the lighter moments one may find many of the latest novels. The books so far received have ar - rived in five cases, only two of which have been unpacked. Some of those already on the shelves are: "The Deepening Stream," by Dorothy Canfield; "The Brothers Karamazoo," by Tydor Doostoeosky; "Swan Song," by John Galsworthy; "The Ordeal of Richard Teverel," by George Meredith; "Cowboy," by Ross Santee; "'Long Hunt," by James Boyd, and "The Three Musketeers," (abridged) by Dumas. i For the English department there ! are: A Spencer Hand Book—Jones; A ! Chaucer Hand Book—French. Those j interested in Economics will find two AT STATE P.-T. A. MEET books, and perhaps more when the i numbering and indexing is completed "The Need of a Dean in All the | "Economic Problems, 'by Fairchild and High Schools of Texas" was the sub- ! Compton, and "Current Economic jeet of an address given at Goose [ Problems," by Hamilton. Among the Creek Wednesday by Mrs. John pletely ignoring the fiery menace a few feet above his head. A gust of wind struck the mass of flaming timbers, they swayed again; then they came crashing downward, carrying Bakemeyer with them and, burying him on the ground 10 feet below. Instantly firemen with long hooks pulled away the burning wood and lifted the body of Bakemeyer to safety; an ambulance with shrieking siren (Continued on Page 3) MRS. BENDER SPEAKS Bender at the annual meeting of the State Association of Mothers and Teachers' organizations. The Tri Cities were hosts to the organization and the meeting was held at the Goose Creek Baptist Church. Mrs. Bender is first vice president of the State Association of Deans ef, Women and Girls, and is active in the movement to secure deans in all high schools of the state. History books is found "Cambridge (Continued Police Reporter Loses By Decision of Judge Prohibition Literature Now at H. J. C Library Police reporters are "supposed have a "pull" with corporation court judges, but Judge Ralph Fowler Tuesday, April 1, rendered a decision against Harry McCormack. Houston Press police reporter. "I am sorry, Mac," said the Judge, "but right is right- That cnbbage hand is worth just twenty and no more. What makes you think it is worth Interesting information concerning twenty-two?" ihe question of prohibition may now "I need twenty-two to win," retorted be gained at the H. J. C. library. Mr. McCormack. The Intercollegiate Prohibition asso- j Jimmie Lengen, party of the second ciation has presented the library with part in the cribbage game, received many books and pamphlets on the sub- I the decision with glee. "I'm a good ject of alcholic drink and prohibition, j cribbage player, Mac," he announced. They include the Standard Encyclo- , Mr. McCormack here proved that he" pedia of the Alcohol Problem, in six! would have made a good lawyer, volumes. ! "* still think I'm right!" he stated. Westminster Boy and Tyjer Girl Win First Places in Two Divisions Venturing forth rrom two small rooms in Westminster Junior Collegt at Tehuacana, Jo Ed Winfree and Christine Fitzgerald carried H. J. C. banners in oratory to second place in both boys and girls' contests, Friday. April 3. Five junior colleges entered contestants in the meet. Representatives from Temple, Tyler, Corsicana and Houston entered in both contests, while Westminster entered an orator in the boys' division only. Tehuacana's lone representative placed first in the boys* contest, while Jo Ed Winfree placed second. Tyler won first place among the girls, and Christine Fitzgerald tied for second. Jo Ed, Christine, and her sister, Carmen, went to Teague Thursday. Reverend Mr. Fitzgerald and his family entertained them overnight, and made up a party which visited Tehuacana Friday morning. Friday afternoon the party returned, and in the evening left again for Tehuacana. After the contest, all returned to the Fitzgerald home for the night. Jo Ed arrived in Houston Saturday night. Christine and Carmen spent Easter with their parents. SUMMER SCHOOL OFFERED UNDER REGULAR STAFF Several New Courses Offered in Attractive Vacation Session TUTORS' "COURSE SET Houston Teachers No Longer Must Leave Town For Extra Work Students of Houston Junior College will be pleasantly surprised at the quantity and quality of the courses to be offered during the fifth annual summer session, June 1 to July 10, according to N. K. Dupre, assistant dean of the college. Plans are well under way for the vacation of administration, and practically all the regular teaching staff has been engaged. "It is no longer necessary for Houston educators to leave the city for their summer study," stated Mr. Dupre. "Although the school is yet in its infancy, it is already helping Houston teachers in this way and due to its (Continued on Page 3) SCHOLARSHIP COUNTS IN HIGH SALARY JOB Do the big jobs go to the student who is a "gladhander" or the one who puts in his time studying? The Houston Press has this to say on the sub ject: There Is a quaint old American tradition that the college student whi makes his mark in scholarship never amounts to much afterward; that the really admirable product of our colleges is the glad-hander who is president of things, plays tackle on the football team, and never lets his studies interfere with his college work; that for every routine job awaiting the student "grind" there are 10 big corporations clamoring for the services at a fancy salary of the high hurdle champion who was president of his fraternity. Enter President Walter S. Gifford -of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company with disillusionment. Gifford reports that men who graduate in the first tenth of their class have four times as many chances of.getting (Continued on Page 3) ' Co-Ed Comes to Aid of Struggling Math Students One mathematical genius in Professor Warren A. Reese's 123 math class rated an Eskimo pie from each member last week. Every person but the Prof was stumped by a stiff problem, and he refused to reveal the solution to the helpless students. H. C. Nagel delivered a brief oration that should inscribe his name in H. J. C.'s hall of fame. "I'll set the class up to Eskimo pies if anyone in here can solve this problem," he stated. Miss Kathryn Johnson then proceeded to tack her name beneath Nagel's by solving the problem. The class as a whole gave Miss Johnson a vote of Appreciation has been expressed for the fact that Professor Vanzee makes such a difficult course as Biology so interesting. APRIL FOOL DAY LAGS AT H. J. C. April Fool Day was one week behind time at H. J. C. Rita Burgess Gould, Majestic Theatre entertainer, was scheduled to appear on the auditorium stage in chapel exercise Wednesday, April 8. Due to a lagging theatre program, Miss Gould was unable to arrive on time. Several announcements were in order, among which was a plea to the students on the part of Smith W. Garrison, president of the Student Asso ciation, to support the Junior Collegf Federated Clubs dance at End O' Main, April 20. After several more announcements, assembly was dismissed for class meet ings. Bill Jeter, in the absence of Bob McCullough, Sophomore president, called an important meeting of the upperclassmen. A fluctuating discussion of the possibilities of sponsoring a Sophomore Ball followed. At length the class decided to stage the dance. Bill Jeter appointed a committee consisting of himself, Smith Garrison, Lu- cian Bukowski, Jane Witherspoon, Helen Lee Davis, and Maurine Edminster to plan the dance for May 8. CHORAL PROGRAM PRESENTED HERE Gypsy Dance and Old Nesrrjv, Songs Given at Assefntily Please Students Houston Junior College students were treated to an interesting type of entertainment at the regular Wednesday night assembly, March 25. The entertainers were members of a choral club from the Houston Negro Junior College, which is the only institution of its kind in the United States. This college is operated on a similar basis as the Houston Junior college. The first number on the program was a chorus of five girls, who sang a humorous song entitled, "Let That Lion Alone." Following this the boys' sextet rendered a splendid piece of harmony called, "I Ain't Gonna' Study War No Mo!" As an encore number they sang another selection which was also well received. One of the girls gave a gypsy dance as a solo number on the program. The girls glee club sang an old favorite selection, "Swing Low Sweet Chariot," which was well received by the students. They also sang an old (Continued on Page 3) SCRIBBLERS ATTEND DR. GRIGG'S LECTURE Crusaders of the pen have ventured , forth repeatedly from the headquart- / ers of their general, Professor Fred R. Birney, located in the San Jacinto High School Building, to invade the> realms of Dr. Edward Howard Griggs, noted lecturer, who defends Taylor School Auditorium. Practically every lecture of the two series, one on Shakespeare's plays and the other on modern problems, has been covered as a journalism class assignment by one or more reporters. Those of the class attending the lectures include L. P. Marshall, Maurine' Keach, Evelyn Cochran, Bessie Robbins, Violet Herbert, Margaret Shell, G. L. Fly, Norma Schneider, Genevieve' Pledge, Marguerite Crom-( heire, Gladys Jacobs, Irene Johnson, George Perry, Carlton Thompson, Milton Moffitt, and Kenneth Fhinjjk. The reporters co-operated with Professor Birney in sending news stories to the "Houston Chronicle," the 'Houston Post-Dispatch," and the "Houston Press." Doctor Griggs has the support of the Public Schools organizatioi presenting his lectures. ill
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