Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 1, November 16, 1928
File 003
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 1, November 16, 1928 - File 003. November 16, 1928. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 18, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/84/show/82.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 16, 1928). The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 1, November 16, 1928 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/84/show/82

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 1, November 16, 1928 - File 003, November 16, 1928, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 18, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/84/show/82.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 1, November 16, 1928
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. II, No. One, November 16, 1928
Contributor
  • Williams, Crawford, Jr.
Date November 16, 1928
Language English
Description From masthead: "Published Monthly by the Students of Houston Junior College of Houston, Texas."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript THE COUGAH Wants Campus "Hoopies" Back Whats' becoming of the old Hoopie and the "Modern Open Air Taxi?" They're fast disappearing and someone is to blame. Main street and the various school campuses seem singularly deserted and we discovered the reason why . . . it's the absence of the Collegiate Fords— we want them back. The flapper and fair young ladies are spurning their offers and invitations to choose instead the new Ford and a supposedly more sensible chauffeur. Well, they are all wet, and we will show you why. In the days of Knights and Ladies, many a blushing damsel, rode away with her light o' love encased in a tin suit and mounted on an old nag because she had not learned the aloof- nes and sophistication of the modern Perhaps you need convincing that the "Jazz Fire Wagon" is superior to the latest model. We'll compare the New Coupe with the Collegiate Model. In the open air type, after a strenuous evening, think of the glorious ride in a car without a top or windshield, only the bare necessities. The clear, crisp night air; the pale moon hanging in the misty sky; the silver stars twinkling their good-evening. Think of the fun of seeing everything as you go riding by in your modernistic chassis, and then the idea of an insignificant coupe, with a top. Another point, the upkeep. The new model needs care almost maternal attention; the other a pint of gas maybe 'water and lottsa shoves. The loss of a fender or a bumper on the latest type is disgracing, and on the "Hoopie" another point toward perfection. The 1928 model must be kept spic and span while with the jazz type, the more mud the more style, the more color, so much the better. Variety is what we crave and the collegiate Ford litterally illustrates "In dividuality/* Now you can see the great mistake you are making in buying a new Ford. Make that soul (like Fred Mosk, dignified business manager of "The Cougar") who still sails around in his old boat feel proud of the chariot he scuttles and convince those with the new model that "Old Pals are the Best Pals after all." Ask the man who owns one! Catherine Ward: Wasn't that Bill Wantzloben? Why didn't he speak to us? Bill Jeter: Couldn't you see? He was slightly under the influence of liquor. Catherine Ward: Well, he needn't be so stuck up about it. Don't Forget— Collegiate Dance Saturday night Nov. 24th University Club Be There! "The Cougar" staff is delighted to learn of the co-operation of Exchange Departments of various college publications throughout the country with the Exchange department of this paper. Among the many papers received by the Cougar Exchange are: "The Scotchman," from Edinburg Junior College, Edinburg, Texas, an unusually well constructed paper which contains news items of unusual interest. It is evident from the advertising carried in this papi that the advertising staff is most efficient. "The Battalion" of A. and M. Col- lege, College Station, Texas, the staff of which is to be congratulated on the excellence of their publication. Keep up the good work. We are interested and concerned in your success. "The Wichitan" of Whichita Falls, Texas, an excellent paper and an exchange with which is certainly a pleasure. Be sure and send us one of your papers every issue. "The Cougar" staff is endeavoring to make this year a better and biggei one for the Houston Junior College We feel that by exchanging publications with other colleges of the state; we can derive many helpful suggestion and solutions to problems with which we come in daily contact. I used to be the cream of her life, But now she just skims me over. Julia Luckie: "Did you know that they don't have any insane asylums ir Arabia? S. B. Elmick: "No, why dont they? Julia Luckie: Because there are nomad people living there. Fred Mosk: How did she ever learn to undress so fast? Crawford Williams: Shes' been play ing strip poker for four years at col- Mrs. Ledlow: I want to buy a gun. Clerk: Have you a license? Mrs. Ledlow: Certainly, look it over. Clerk: But madam, this is a marriage license. Mrs. Ledlow: Well! By the time the members of a committee have eaten lunch and learned the purpose of the meeting it's time to adjourn. Once upon a time a man got up early one Sunday morning to let the ice man in, and not being able to find his bathrobe he slipped on his wife1 kimona. When he opened the door h was greeted by a nice big kiss by the ice man. nd the only way he could figure it Aout was that the ice m: wife had a kimona just like the one he had on.—The Skiper. Customer: I was told to buy a cas serole or a camisole and I can't remember which. Clerk: Ah, Is the chicken dead or One, Did you fill your date last night? More, I hope so. She at everything in sight. CLUBS Formation of a Glee Club, composed of about 25 Houston Junior College students, has been announced by Miss Alpha Adams, director of the Club. The Club has already made arrangements to conduct the Student Association assembly, November 28, and !it present is making plans for a concert to be given about January 1, according to Mrs. Adams. Rehearsal of the club members will be held at the W. L. Pace Piano Store from 3 to 4 p.m., Sunday. Music will donated by Mrs. Chris Ming, of unn's and Goggan's Music House. A treasure hunt will be given members of the football squad at an early date by members of the Pep Club. Twenty new members were admitted to the club at a recent initiation. After secret rites were administered, the new members were taken to the music room and served refreshments. Girls of the Pep Club led Houston Junior College students in the Armistice Day parade. Officers of the club for the present term are: Mary Elizabeth Rigg, president; Julia Luckie, vice-president; Margaret Studdert, secretary; Ruth Watford, treasurer; Mrs. Bender and Miss Mackey, sponsors. Members of the French Club entertained with an annual Armistice party at the Community House of the Trinity church. Bridge was played from 4 to 6 p.m., after which prizes were awarded. Harris Is Coach of Debate Club The debating squad of the Houston Junior College, under the direction of H. W. Harris, promises to have a most successful season. A regular club has not yet been organized but some fifteen boys and nearly as many girls have shown great interest in beginning the season. At present the squad is working on the interscholastic league question in order to accommodate the high schools of the city. Mr. Harris declared that he hopes to bring a team from the University of Texas to Houston to debate with the college team. "Last year the Junior College team defeated a Texas team, one of the members of the team belonging to the varsity squad," Mr. Harris said. 'I also intend to debate the Houston Junior College with the league of Junior Colleges and bring as many as possible of the teams to the college auditorium.1" The first debate is to be held within three weeks, with Sam Houston high school, in the auditorium. The club is to offer debating, extemporaneous speaking and orations. Let's Go!- BRENHAM Cougars vs. BLINN Game Called at 2:30 p.m. (Editors Note: In this column we intend to damage no one's character. We just put down what we know. Be a sport when you see yourself as others see you.) Guess who we saw one Sunday night on a dark and dreary road? Oh, yes, Frank Ladin, we saw you! If anyone sees a Dodge Sedan, at any time, coming in any direction, at any time, kindly depart, in any direction; it is Bill Jeter. Portia Cleves, we were ashamed of your enthusiasm at the football game —and your unlady-like cheers for— oh, well, we won't tell the player's name this time! Well, do guess who has one of the hew "collegiate" suits. None other than our Merlyn Christie. God's gift to the fair sex. Uh-huh, we saw you in front of a mirror, too, Meryln. We notice Mr. Harris is wearing a red tie. Good for you, Prof., we always like to see someone stick to his principles. Fine taxi service. Cars delivered at the front door—(not literally, either). Wonder if Bill'' Wontenzlogan knows anything about this? If he doesn't, Mr. Ander or Dupree will. Little Gertrude says she does wish mamma would let her go to "State"— She could be good. The editor would like to request that Fred Mosk keep his social engagements. It's too big a responsibility for the editor to think up plausible excuses for brunettes. Don't you think it would be a good idea for the Freshman Class to donate a "Slime Cap'" to Dudley Ellis- even at that, the cap would be above his actions! Bo Martin has developed a "pashion" for swinging on the pole in front of "Wood's Drug Store." Is it a case of perpetual childhood or that Svolution we hear so much about? Any information appreciated. Has anyone named the waiting room out in front? How about "The Student's Common," or "Everyone's Hangout,'" or perhaps "Social Boulevard"? Mr. Porter's Trig, class knows a certain blonde-headed co-ed who has such a crush on Mr. P. she can't even walk class for more than ten minutes. J. D. Larkin seems to have a 99- year lease on the "courting room." We wonder if it's his "it" or 'cause he's so talented. We wonder—wonder! Overheard a fair lady say, "Gee! ain't love grand when there's so many to love? Hooray, we believe in the Tiiob law, too. Freshman, if you're taking "bugs." be careful about those frogs that swell up and pop. One young Miss vows hers was popping up and she stabbed him to let out the air. She hit his heart. That was a case of "Lie there and bleed"—and howl Dorothy Downman says she thinks it is perfectly vile to cut up innocent frogs! We wonder if it's Miss Huberich's soothing voice that lulls Henry Brown to sleep in English class or the soothing voice of someone else (the night before) that causes him to indulge in "shut eye." Sh-h-h! M. E., why do you walk alone on Main Street after "taps"? DRAMATIC CLUB— (Continued from Page 1J dearest to his heart, Mrs. John R. Bender." Garland Sadler, president of the club, has appointed a committee consisting of Aileen Pickett, Mary Eliza- i beth Rigg, "Tony" Ragland and Richard Speed to choose a play for which try-outs and rehearsals will begin this week. Although the exact date of the presentation has not been decided on it is announced that it will be free. Officials of the club this year are Garland Sadler, president; Richard Speed, vice president and Bernice Newton, secretary and treasurer. Everyone interested in dramatics is requested to see Garland Sadler. Fred: How long are you going to be gone? Crawford: Can't say. Fred: Well, approximately? C: I really don't know. Fred: You've no idea then just how long it will take you. C: Not the least. Fred: Well, all right. I'll can be back by then, too. C: O.K. Don't forget. I'll be looking for you, Fred: Sure thing. I'll be there. She came home with her hat on one side and her clothes all crushed looking. Looks as though shes' been knocked down by a motorist, said one neighbor sympathetically. Or picked up, said the other thoughtfully. What's on the menu? I have frog's legs, chicken liver, pig's feet, and— Never mind your deformities; what have you to eat? alive. Lady, My husband is a deceitful wretch. Last night he pretended to believe me when he knew I was lying to him.—London Mail. In 1918—Close the saloons and save the boys. In 1928—Close the garages and save the girls.
File Name uhlib_10270243_v002_n001_003.jpg