Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 1, November 16, 1928
File 002
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 1, November 16, 1928 - File 002. November 16, 1928. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 18, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/84/show/81.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 16, 1928). The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 1, November 16, 1928 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/84/show/81

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 1, November 16, 1928 - File 002, November 16, 1928, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 18, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/84/show/81.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 1, November 16, 1928
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. II, No. One, November 16, 1928
Contributor
  • Williams, Crawford, Jr.
Date November 16, 1928
Language English
Description From masthead: "Published Monthly by the Students of Houston Junior College of Houston, Texas."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE COUGAR ®fje Cougar Editor Crawford Williams. Jr. Itusinc-ss Manager Fred Mosk Associate F.ditora Garland Sadler. Hill Jeter and Paula Holland Advertising Managers Kenneth Jones and Dorothy Dixon, Assistant Business Manai rer Kugene Tadlock Circulation Manager .... Corinnc Spears Sponsor .. May Bess Huberich Honorary Advisor . . F. M. Black DEPARTMENT EDITORS. Spurts . Richard Ragland Exchange Annie 1 lay Quarltrough and Frank Ladin. Society Bernice Newton Club ... Alleen Pickett Literary Julia Luckie Dramatic . Mary Elizabeth Risg Art . Kalhryn Jackson and Carol! Canatella Spirit (Editor's Note: A series of three articles on the subject of "School Spirit," will appear periodically, in hope that a greater feeling may exist at Junior College.) In the college's second year of athletics, rapid strides have been taken in the physical education of the students. It has been raised above the high school class and given a college air. The reminders of high school days are becoming obsolete on the athletic field and the pleading of the coach to "Forget your high school stuff, you are in college now," is beginning to take effect. Nothing is more amusing, or disconcerting, than to have a college man remind us of what he did in high school. You are in college now, make a iiame for yourself, don't live on your past. The majority of the student body is composed of transfers, students who have witnessed, and been a part of ""university and college athletics. It takes no editorial to bring back to their minds the spirit that prevailed at these contests. No thrill is comparable to that of singing the college "anthem"' before the kick-off of an important football game. Those of you who have displayed spirit flor your school, fought for it, cheered for it, lauded it to the skies, remember that the college you attend at present is worthy of these affections, or your name would not appear on its rolls. The value of "school spirit" needs no further proof, it is apparent; but the spirit of Junior College needs further proof, and it is not apparent. We have no school song, no organized rooting section, merely the high school attitude of crowding the sidelines and making "wise cracks." When the student body realizes that spirit is a credit to themselves, as well as their College and team, Houston Junior College will soar to the top—a junior college to which you will point with pride. As the final note to this first installment on "school spirit," we wish \o congratulate the Pep Squad. It is the first real move toward a real display of spirit. There is plenty of room for improvement in the individual display of spirit, both off and on the athletic field. If for some reason you are unable to take active part in athletics, help the team and your college by attending the games and entering into the spirit of things. Above all, speak well of your school athletics, for if you don't, who will? You are a part of Houston Junior College, don't lower yourself by belittling your college or any part of it. A good thought, well expressed, is often a source of inspiration to thousands whom the author never sees. A husbands* first idea is to protect his wife, but it slowly dawns on him that he'll be doing well if he protects himself. MEMORIAL TO COACH BENDER— (Continued from Page 1) itself. He was an individual; there was but one Coach Bender. Life to him was one of potential energies. Few know him or loved him more than those boys with whom he labored upon the athletic field. Despite his years he was the hardest player on the team. Before the game we were to him a bunch of pink tea, a bunch of ragamuffins. After the fray he called the team about him; there was a tear in those deep blue eyes and a tremor in his voice. He told us that some time he might seem to be severe yet that he was not, that we were all his boys, and that one was as good as another. Yes, we were his boys and he was our coach, we understood; and thank God we would rather have been ■a ragamuffin under our fighting lit- tile cornhusker Johnnie Bender than an All-American with anyone else. A thousand times we have heard him repeat these words, "Football is played from the heart," and thus did he play the game of life. He was a true gentleman and sportsman. In victory he was modest; in defeat he was submissive yet not discouraged. Men knew him, men loved him. To the Ruler of all Creation, to his parents, to his family and to the University of Nebraska, his Alma Mater, our heads are bowed in gratitude for his life, and in sorrow at his passing. He is gone, yet his courageous spirit shall forever perpetuate within the hearts of men. We shall always remember him as a great athlete, a noble gentleman, a builder of youth, a mold- er of character, and a true friend. COACH SMITH— (Continued from Page 1) ference. In his last year at the University he had the honor of being elected captain of the track team. Some of his many outstanding performances are a 23 foot, 5 Jich jump for the Southwest Conference record and a 23 foot, 1 inch jump for the Southern A.A.U. record. Coach Smith was elected to many honorary organizations while at Texas. He was for two years a member of the honor council. President of International Relations Club, an honorary organization, President of the Graduating class of 1926-27, Member of Pi Sigma Alpha, an honorary social and political science club;, mfember, Phi Sigma Delta, an honorary national athletic organization, as well as many others. Coach Smith is not without experience as an athletic director, having turned out successful teams at Terrell High School in 1923-24. We feel that under the competent direction of Coach Smith, the Junior College is assured of successful teams in all athletics. JUNIOR COLLEGE IS— (Continued from Page 1) over that of last year. The enrollment of one year ago stood at 370. Of this number more than 70 per cent have returned. This is indeed a remarkable showing as the return of old students is seldom so large in junior colleges. The administrative authorities are greatly pleased with these reports and are loud in their praise of the success of the institution. During the first year of its existence, the Houston Junior College ranked second among the junior colleges of Texas. This includes both state, church and private institutions. At this time the Houston Junior College was in its first year and was only a hopeful experiment, while the leader John Tarleton was a state supported institution and a regular branch of Texas A. and M. College. A large percentage of the transfers into Rice Institute were made from Junior College students. Full sophomore credit was granted in all Society Engagement and approaching marriage of one of our former students, Miss Edna Hudson to Mr. Alton Crawford as been announced. Miss Hudson, a freshman, was editor of our new science paper, "The Cougar Scientific Weekly." The wedding is to take place at the home of Miss Hudson's parents sometimes during the month of January. Freshman girls were recently entertained by members of the Pep Club with a tea at the home of Elma Bas- quez, 2501 Blodgett. Receiving with the hostess and her mother in the living room were Mrs. Bender, Mary Elizabeth Rigg, and Julia Luckie. In the dining room, Cecilia Basquez presided over the punch bowl with the assistance of Alleen Pickett and Ruth Watford. In the living room, the black and gold color scheme was carried out effectively in the placement of tall baskets of golden chrysanthemums, and huge bowls of Biack-eyed susans, while pink and green predominated in the dining room. Pink radiance roses and coral vine enhanced the beauty of the room in which tall pink candles in silver holders were burning. The table was lovely with a centerpiece of pink roses and coral vine. Numerous guests and members of the faculty called during the after- instances where the requirements were fulfilled. Numerous students of last year will be found enjoying the privileges of sophmores at the University of Texas and Texas A. and M. College. Such acceptance of our transfers is encouraging. The projspects\for a large enrollment during the coming semester is very bright. The homesick student, the boy with the broken pocket book and the high school student who thought college was all play will be back in town to start things anew. Next year the enrollment of freshmen should be the greatest in the history of the school. At the same time we will send out our students to major colleges and universities all over the land. The Houston Junior College will be well on the road to being the greatest institution of its type in the Sotuh. BLANKET TAX— (Continued from Page 1) wilfully ignores the taxation is termed a "dead-beat,'" one whose interest of self has exceeded his interest of school. Of course there are those who can not afford the expenditure, but they are given an opportunity to make amends if they wish- In our own college about 140 out of some 450 students have paid their blanket tax. And yet there are those who wonder why Houston Junior College has no more spirit than it has. Here lies the opportunity for those who are working, and have the money, to show their school spirit. Those who can not afford it, may take part in athletics, and are urged to do so. This is the first year H. J. C. has availed itself of the blanket tax, and the tax was made unusually small in comparison with senior colleges and universities. At Rice the tax is $16.50. Texas is a larger institution and has reduced her tax to $10 a student. At Junior College the tax is $5, really a small sum between "spirit" and "dead-beat." Ida: Paul asked me for a kiss last night. Louise: What did you say? Ida: Same old thing. Louise: What did he do? Ha: Same old thing. BLINN NEXT— (Continued from Page 1) their feet. Blinn seemed to do the same thing with the Cougars in the first half of the game, but during the second half the Cougars retaliated and held them to their score. The boys figured out Blinn's style, it seems, and we believe the affair next Saturday will have a different result. However, we must keep in mind that Texas freshmen fell before Blinn, the first time in eight years that they have been beaten. Allen Academy has been the only stumbling block for the Memorial boys, and that score was only 7-G. But nothing can be determined by putting scores on paper, for after all it is up to the teams, and our team, if given the proper support, promises victory. SOCIAL AFFAIR— (Continued from Page li its approval by the enthusiasm for this, the first big dance of the season." The "Collegians'' dance orchestra, popular musical aggregation, has been secured to furnish music for the affair from 9 p.m. till?. This orchestra made its initial appearance before the college this year at the gym dance given recently. The dance will be known as the "College" dance and a special effort wtll be made to acquaint^ both the high and low seniors of the local high school with Junior College social life. Students of all high schools of the city are invited to attend. Junior College freshmen have challenged the sopomores to a ticket selling contest, the winner of which is to be given a dance by the loser in the college gym. BILL JETER CHOSEN— (Continued from Page 1) mately two-thirds as many votes as Jeter. Since being installed in office Jeter has organized a social committee which will guide and direct the social activities of the college for the ensuing year. Jeter demonstrated his appreciation of the honor accorded him by planning and carrying to a successful completion an informal "get-together" dance in the college gymnasium. This dance, coming as it did at the beginning of the term, served to drive home to the new students the welcome the old students felt for them but were handicapped in expressing. At present Jeter is devoting all of his time to making plans for the Association dance, to be held at the University Club, November 24. Jeter had the distinction of playing quarter-back on the Junior College football team during its first year of existence and lettering at that position. During the football season Jeter was the only man who never lost a minute's play. While attending high school Jeter also lettered in football and was regarded as one of the best defensive ends of the city. THE PLACE TO LEARN "How can a chap acquire the habit of Bleeping In a chair?" "Sit In classes at college for a few years." WIGGLED OUT She—How did you ever get so strong, Tom? Tom — Exercising lilc* this—with dumbbells. ALPHA CHI- Much discussion at the meetings centered around the selection of the society pin and one which is said to be of unique and distinctive design has been selected. Students will be able Jo judge for themselves as they are to be seen on the campus at an early date. Charter members of the society are Eugene Tadlock, Bill Jeter, Crawford Williams, Frank Ladin, Fred Mosk, Walter Scarborough and Carroll Canatella. TO THE SUB. They cry of "Grange and Oberlander!" Of "Friedman and Marek!" But where's the cry for the battered guy Who gets it in the neck? Who is it works for three hard years In seas of mud and water, And all for naught, although he's fought He never plays a quarter! It is the lowly substitute^ God bless his unknown name. For him the busted arms and ribs—■ For stars—the praise and fame. SOPHS ADOPT PLAN— (Continued from Page I) adviser, is to appoint four members as a cabinet to assist him in his duties as head of the sophomore class. Cabinet members selected by the chairman, however, must be approved by the sophomore class. Sophomores declare that this plan of organization is better fitted to the present needs of the class than the old method whereby a president was forced to carry the burden of solving problems, with which he was unfamiliar, without an advisory board. Mr. Harris: And what will you be when you grow up my son? Freshman: A man. Portia: Why don't you use your head when you out with a boy? Evelyn: I'd rather use my neck. Boy, what kinda seegar is dat you is smoking? Nigger, dats a quarter seegar. Quarter nothing. You never pay no two bits for a seegar. I din't say nothing about dat. De boss ge smokes three-quarters and I smoke a quarter. Miss Huberich: Tell me one or two things about John Milton? Dudley: Well, he got married and wrote Paradise Lost and then his wife died and he wrote Paradise Regained.
File Name uhlib_10270243_v002_n001_002.jpg