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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 6, January 25, 1933
File 001
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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 6, January 25, 1933 - File 001. January 25, 1933. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/74/show/70.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 25, 1933). The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 6, January 25, 1933 - File 001. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/74/show/70

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 6, January 25, 1933 - File 001, January 25, 1933, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/74/show/70.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 6, January 25, 1933
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. VI, No. 6, January 25, 1933
Contributor
  • Julian, James L.
Date January 25, 1933
Language English
Description From title page: "Published by the journalism students of the Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript STUDENT VIEWS COLLEGE NEWS THE COUGAR PUBLISHED BY THE JOURNALISM STUDENTS OF THE HOUSTON JUNIOR COLLEGE mnSTONrTEXA^WEbNESDAyT^jANUARYJsTwja DON'T MISS FRIDAY'S DANCE STUDENT ASSOCIATION DANCE FRIDAY Pen Points For some unexplainable reason, the staff of the 1932 Cougar has been practically unable to put out a Junior College paper regularly every two weeks. The schedule calls for a student newspaper every other Wednesday night. We students expect it when we pay our activity fee. The staff regrets the irregularity with which your Cougar has been coming out of his den, but we promise you that during the coming term, beginning perhaps with this issue, you will see him every other Wednesday night. We may have to chase him out with threats of no breakfast, but you shall see him. This term which ends during the current week has been trying to us all. We're surely glad that it's over. Houston Junior college has suffered mightily. F. M. Black and Wallace H. Miner have passed from within its very ranks. Their memories live on as an inspiration. We miss Mr. Black and Mr, Miner, and the going has been rougher without them, but let's forge ahead in the manner they would have ( done. Let the past be forgot. Tomorrow a new day dawns. Not many H. J. C. students attended ' the performances of the Shakespeare players last week. That is regrettable. When it was recalled that Sophomore * English classes study "Hamlet," we expected to see more students in attendance, but were sorry and disap- „ pointed in failing to notice very many. To view a performance of the Bard of Avon's plays is much more enjoyable than just the drab reading of one. , Volley ball has its advantages has been proven lately in the gymnasium of the college. The floor is crowded to capacity whenever the net is ■ stretched familiarly across it, ond a good time is had by all. Ping-pong has its day too in the gym, but some of the brawny roughnecks of the college don't realize their own strength. There are never any ping-pong balls' to be had. They get broken on about the third hit. A committee was gotten together hurriedly during the past week at Mack Douglas' Audabon printing shop. * (Drop in sometime for a cup of used Ink.) President, I. M. "Forhim Brinkley called it at the last minute to get a slant on the way Mack prints bids. Slew foot Aitken, chairman of the • committee drew up his idea of a bid. "You are cordially invited to attend the Student's Association prom of the Houston Junior college at 10 p.m. Fri- * day January 27, at the University Club • • . Price $1." Donald's version read. "No Soap," SCHOOL STUDENTS TOLD TO CONTINUE "ON TO COLLEGE" Oberholtzer and Harris Head Movement in Benefit of Junior College PROFESSORSMAKE TALKS The need for college training has been stressed before students in the senior high schools of Houston for the I past two weeks in the "On-to-College" campaign, fostered by the school district and officials of the Junior College for urging Houstonians to avail themselves of the advantages afforded by the Houston Junior College. Tlie movement, headed by Dr. E. E. Oberholtzer, president of the college and Harvey W. Harris, head of the school's English department, is being conducted preliminary to the opening of the college's spring term, February first. "A study of the pursuits of young people of the city reveals that there are hundreds of persons who are earnestly dejairiilg to continue their education," Dr. Oberholtzer said, 'tine re are, moreover, numerous adults seeking additional culture but who are handicapped by day jobs." "Tre Junior College was founded with the objective of serving oil classes in the community, and I believe that now is a psychological time for folks to avail themselves of either two years of accredited college work or for general culture training. The night classes make the institution a convenient one for working people, and at this time when most of us are interested in effecting economies, special attraction is offered by the college to those who wish to go to cllege and remain at home." Ms. Harris, Mr. French, and Mrs Bender have appeared before several high school assemblies and talked to the seniors on the advisability of attending college. Through arrangements with local radio stations, programs were also conducted relative to the opening of the new term. BID COMMITTEE Wilms Lindsay, Donald Aitken, and Mary Lou Gaines, members of the bid committee for the Student's Association Dance to be held at 10 p.m. Friday at the University Club. FREE DANCE AT END OF MIN ATTRACTS COLLEGE STUDENTS Ed Eiseman Gives Invitation to College and Is Taken Up Readily by H. J. C. LARGE CROWD DANCES Last Wednesday night found students from every high school in the city end Junior College dancing to the music of Curtis Smith and his orchestra at End O' Main. The dance was free and was made possible through the generosity of Mr. Eiseman. owner of End O Main Dance Hall. Names were carefully checked at the door to insure the fact that those admitted were really students. A fairly large though very mixed crowd turned out for the dance- The dance lasted from nine until twelve. COLLEGE PEP CLUB ELECTS OFFICERS FOR COMING TERM Six New Members Initiated; Cub Was Organized To Promote Spirit BENDER~Ts SPONSOR New officers of the Cougar Collegians were elected at 7:10 in room 222 tonight, Wednesday, January 25. Six new members were initiated into the club January i. They were Lucy Grady, Dorothy Frew, Florence Borof- sky. Betty Starley, Marjorie Wilke, and Katherine Berry. The present officers of the club, which is organized to promote school spirit, are Nora Louise Calhoun, president; Dorothy Frew, vic-3 president; Florence Borofsky, secretary; and Frances Nesmith, treasurer. There are no plans to bei made pub- c. Mrs. Pearl Bender is sponsor of the club. TED CLIFFORD TO PLAY FOR ANNUAL COLLEGE AFFAIR President Brinkley Appoints Five Committees To Plan University Club Prom NO TAX ON BIDS Plans are going steadily forward for the Students' Association prom of the Houston Junior College to be held at 10 p.m. Friday, according to Jimmy Brinkley president of the college stu- ents* association. The dance will benefit the Student Loan Fund of the college, and there will be no tax on bids, President Brinkley announced Monday. With the new term starting at the college on January 30, it is expected that many students will apply for loans. With a view to completing the dance plans hurriedly, Brinkley has ap pointed the following committees: Bid committee: Donald Aitken (chairman), Fairfax Moody, Mary Bradley Anderson, Nora Louise Calhoun, Wilma Lindsay, and Mary Louise Gaines. Hall committee: Harold Renfro (chairman), J. C. Allwright, Hampton Robinson, Ed Pulaski, and Nelda Smith. Publicity committee: A. Marks (chairman), Hope McCutcheon, James Julian, L. P. Marshall, Jesse Darling. General committee: Mack Douglass (chairman), Pat Foley, Fred Aebi, Leroy Melcher, Harry Gray, and James Coulson. Faculty committee: Harvey W. Harriss (chairman), Alva Lee Ker- (Continued on Page 3) BILL TELL BY A. MARKS Old Bill Tell was happy. Happy as a seven-year-old with a cowboy suit. It was Now Year's eve, and he was off duty. His feet were comfortable. Eased it of their size 12 enclosures, they I were more than glad for the long rest ■led one member of the [they were granted in the more roomy mentioned committee. "After they've \size 14 slippers, . . . You know the paid the dollar the bid should read, «a-"°n. Bill wore a 12, but a 13 felt 'You are now entitled to attend the oo good lie bought a 14. Student's Association prom of the The dark blue uniform with the Houston Junior college at 10 p.m. shiny badge hung over the bed post. Frday, Jan. 27, at the .University club." j In its place was the soft smoking robs It serves Jimmie right for waiting till Ithat Jill, the sprightly one daughter the last minute to make a cornmittea. [had given Bill for Christmas. Natur- Anywr.y, the dance is going to be:ally, Jill was out with the ladies . . . big, sweet,' and lovely, and it's Friday What 18-year-old Miss wouldn't bo on night, and costs only a dollar, no tart. INew Years Eve- • . . Bill wasn't It's to benefit the Siud.-nt Loan fund, worried. and we'll see you out ihere. , He was sitting there in front of the * • * I open fire reminiscing. Another year The fall term of ,1932 passes and we [had passed. Bill was happy. Day look back either with the idea th;it j after day he had trudged his beat, and we've accomplished much or with a ; his heavy brogans had witlistood many He was proud of the fact that lustily . . . even happily, in the over- no beer gangs cluttered his streets. Everyone from Sixth to Franklin knew Bill . . . respected him. True, some had tried to bribe him to let th.m operate on his beat, but he had told them where to go. He was fearless, because he knew he was right. And as he sat there in the glare of tho open hearth, dreaming of the past, he was happy for many things. He had carried on for his deceased wife, and had done everything in his power to bring up Jill in the right way. . . . H> h:;d been richly rewarded. Jill was a splendid specimen of American girlhood. She didn't miss the '- er t.:.;:t. Bill tried to keep away from her. And she didn't get any anyplace else. But Don Mascara was determined to put his beer on Franklin Street, and he was determined, also, that Jill Tell would drink some of it. Maybe a little too much. at 1:30 a.m. on January the first stuffed chair. It was a crims to wake him, but that wasn't half of the crime that Don Mascara was committing that morning to start the New Year right. Old Bill awoke with a start. He was conscious that he was being watched, and perhaps he heard that soft, self-satisfied chuckle (hat Don uttered. 'Good morning, old man," Don began, well in hand of tlie situation, be- cause he had a trusty .38 trained on |the care and coddli the 'old man', "Have you decided to j mental performers, but DRAMATIC CLUB TO OFFER MANY PLAYS IN ENSUING YEAR Student Directors To Try Hand At Producing Selected Plays NEW PLAYS WANTED Offering unlimited opportunity to talented and versatile students, the Dramatic Club's plans for the coming erm include the bi-monthly presen- aiicm of numerous short dramas and comedies under student direction as well as the usual long production in the Spring. Contesting for highest honors, six or eight student directors will choose plays, cast the characters, and direct the presentation in the auditorium. Besides directing the standard plays, industrious directors are conducting a diligent search for original plays by students, for any and all such plays discovered will be given preference over standard masterpieces. Until the pressnt time the Dramatic director, Mrs. Hooker, has had tempera- she shifts- Club's turn over a new leaf for. the »ew year, the responsibility for an intelligent and help yourself to a few bottles of ; production . to the trained and Modest Mascara's beverags'"" doubt in our mind as to just what we .. have achieved. ' His was the only neighborhood in i after the first part of his plan had . Achievements for the student body ;h:- city in which the prohibition laws ! been perfectly executed, he jimmied as a whole have been many and j Were respected. . . . Why? . . . Bill j his way into Bill Tell's house, and (Continued on Page 4) ishot straight. From either the shoulder [found the old gentleman snoring trained direction of ambitious managers, These managers must guide, order, direct, and superintend the work of their casts, transforming plastic junior college students into superb performers without the assistance of Mrs. Hook?r. Unlimited power thus thrust into eager hands is expected to yield th-2 skill and ingenuity neces- Nothing but a little shooting match, isary to conduct fast moving, vivacious copper," Don eytid his sleepy foe. "So iplays. Not too original acting and the get your duds on and let's get going." [selection of original plays is left en- "Going? Where?" Old Bill asked, itirely to tho initiative and resource of (Continued on Page 4) students. You know better than that," Bill retored. "As a copper, my" name stays clean." "I thought as much, Bill," Don responded, "But perhaps before this night is over you'll change your lily- white mine!-" "Oh yeah, Don, what'
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