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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 5, January 27, 1932
File 002
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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 5, January 27, 1932 - File 002. January 27, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/64/show/61.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 27, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 5, January 27, 1932 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/64/show/61

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 5, January 27, 1932 - File 002, January 27, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/64/show/61.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 5, January 27, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 5, January 27, 1932
Contributor
  • Marks, A.
Date January 27, 1932
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE COUGAR THE COUGAR Of The Houston Junior College Houston, Texas Established 1928 Published semi-monthly during the college year. Subscriptions, $1 per year. Single copies, 10 cent*. EDITORIAL BOARD Managing Editor .. . ...A. Marks News Editor L. P. Marshall Assistant News Editors Lucy Tailey Betty Covingt. Faculty Advisor F. R. Birney DEPARTMENT HEADS Sport Editor Feature Editor Literary Editor Humor Editor Exchange Editor. REPORTERS Harry Phillips, Gladys Howard, James Page, N. C. Jensen, Eugene Heard, Margaret Macey, Wilma Lindsay, Wal- say Garrett. Are You a Citizen? Citizens of a nation, state or city are usually those persons who are interested in the welfare of their civic organizations. To be a good citizen, one must first be eligible to exercise the right "to vote. Before a resident of this state and this city can vote, he must have a poll tax. If each person in Houston Junior college who is of legal, voting age will provide himself with a poll tax before January 31, our institution will be well represented at the polls during the coming 12 months. TJjj^^-ice for loyal citizenship is $l.au. .„,11 you let $1.50 deprive YOU of your rights as a citizen for the next 12 months, including as it does elections of every type, from local school board to national president? Buy your POLL TAX AT ONCE. It is the mark of good citizenship, intelligent suffrage, and TRUE AMERICANISM! WHAT I WANT IN LIFE By MRS. HOWARD V*CK "Free-heartedness, and graciousness, and undisturbed trust, and re quitted love, and the sight of peace of others, and the ministry to their pain; these— and the blue sky above and the sweet waters and flowers beneath; and mysteries and presences innumerable,—of living things, may yet be here my riches, untormenting and divine; serviceable for the life that now is; nor it may be, without promise of that which is to come."—Ruskin. Mother Knows Best! February 1 is the beginning of a new year for thousands of Houston students whether they be in college or public school. Failing and passing grades in hundreds of courses will be given, and undoubtedly deserved. Are you of the failing or passing class? Surely you students of the Houston Junior college aren't guilty of having adverse attitudes toward study. Enrollment in the Junor college actually signifies that you are in the quest of learning, so why become opposed to doing home study and research work in excess of the regular course? Work in the Houston Junior college is not more difficult than that of any other college, and possibly it is less difficult. If you doubt the above statement, look around you. If you thing that Mr. Miner is piling outside work on you in his history course, have a talk with a student who takes the same history course at Riee institute. He will have finished two books where you are just completing one. Nearly everything gained in modern life is a result of the effort put forth. "As ye sow, so shall ye reap." Instructors in the Houston Junior college have the interests of their pupils at heart, so if you get slightly peaved because you have to read 50 pages of outside reading in English, history, math, or science class, just remember that probably the instructor knows best, and if you still have the idea that he is wrong, see if Mr. Dupre can't get YOU a job instructing. Have a say in your government by paying your poll tax now. Be a real citijen and pay your poll When I say that I want in life all that every other individual receives, it is a broad statement, and sounds like a child asking Santa Claus for more than his share of toys. But when you come to analyze it, it is not much after all. I want in life the experiences others have; the san -V. F. Harrison perielices that come to each student of James Julian this college; the same experiences of Mare Jane Fly my neighbors and friends. In a word, Ruth Depperman T want to live. That is not much, is -Wenonah Phelps it? To Iive? Irt what way? In a simply way. Comforts and a few luxuries' are necessary to enjoyment, certainly, but they are insignificant compared to the real purpose of living. They do not stand out prominently; neither is a mere existence desirable. Success, you say, is what I want in life. True. The Business man, the professional man, the minister, the farmer, you, and I,—all want success. But does success mean the same to each of us? Does success mean the to you that it does to me? Certainly not. Success has its peculiar meaning to each individual, old and young, rich and poor. Success, to the business man, means financial gain; success, to the professional man, means achievement from honest effort; success, to the minister, means conversion of souls; success, to the farmer, means a plenteous crop; to you, it may mean something else; to me, it is just living,—living in my own simple way, being a natural human being, with the same desires, likes, and dislikes, of my neighbors, only in a different fashion perhaps. Again, I want to have a knowledge of my obligations and a capacity to perform them; to be sensitive to the responsibilities that surround me, and establish my credit for good faith and dependence. In this, I desire no proxy, no substitute to take toll of my own liberties. I wish to act freely of my own volition, and to feel that it right, not a debt I owe, realizing that any benevolence is not praiseworthy- just living. I want to have a purpose, too; f< there is nothing to my mind so tragic as drifting aimlessly with the tide, at the mercy of the waves, to be wrecked and cast ashore. Then we become driftwood. But the glamor of superfi cial success, acquisition of wealth, an other allurements tempt us to try to do something that we are not fitted to do; however, a close study of our abilities, our training, and our aptitude, should teach us to select the ship we shall be able to pilot; and with this in mind, I should like to embark and steer for a definite port. I consider purpose one of the strongest elements of character; part of our makeup that we employ every day; part of our lives—just part of living. And then, I want to know enough about the machinery of society and its history to enable me to apply effectively what gifts I may have. I want to have adequate skill in communication with others o; use language discriminatingly, to be adequate of expression—to be clearly understood, and to understand clearly. I want to be able to measure up to the highest without outmeasuring; to weigh without outweighing. Just to live as one of the crowd, neither inferior nor outstanding. The success I want in living, therefore, is not sussess from a religious standpoint, although that is included. It is not success in living, in a prudish "better-than-thou" attitude; nor do I desire to become a character such" as the "man who lived by the side of the road," although such character is included. While the "friend to man" is worthy of our admiration, there is no WALLACE (LEFTY) MINER PITCHES NO-HIT GAME ISSUES NO PASSES The Four Horsemen of the> Pass Eclipse, Demolition, Death, Destruction, and Dynamite, in the persons of Hooker, Miner, Birney and Rees, disposed of the students in a little baseball game called tests or lowly, lowly is thy grade. The two factions have been battling each other since last September, and they will probably continue until Ji Neither side seems to have gained advantage but the headline said the profs were ahead. That's hooey. The reason the head hues said that was because it just fitted the space we allot for heads. Ha ha. The work of some of the outstanding performers is given below. "Lefty" Miner, star pitcher for the Professor Podunks, worked so easily and nonchalantly that he appeared to have a case of spring fever, and he was so effective in his pop-qui es that he had all the students guessing (oh those puns, 1 guess I am punny that way>. The game was climaxed by a tete-a- tete between H. Bellringer Renfro and an opposing player. Renfro had his wrist chastised but retaliated by saying "boo" (the old brute). His adversary re-acted by smashing a juicy egg- custards in little Harold's face. Umpire N. K. Dupre banished both antagonists from the contest. Oh, yes, about the custard—and as Ben Bernie would say, 'we hoped you liked it, Harold'. A. Marks, who by-the-way, is the editor-in-chief of the Cougar, which you know is the student publication of the H. J. C, and is published sometimes weekly and always weakly, did the same thing at the bat that Casey did. He struck out. But Adolph M. sure made his mark (trying to be punny again). The schoolboys won the first rubber when Chas. Buse claimed the score was 40-love and Roland Hall said it was ovey dovey or some kind of ove. Mrs. Ebaugh had a tough season- she managed to flunk only 99 per cent of her students. Of course this is not ac many as she usually fails, but he became generous and let that one per cent slip by. Murray A. Miller (hi, there, Murray) was in such a batting slump he never flunked anybody except his friends,, relatives, strangers and acquaintances.) One refreshing tint to the delectable j series was that the highly touted tooted1 tutors took too long to wreck weak,; wailing, whipped, whoois and the cry- ' ing, crazy, cash customers couldn't complain. Line-ups: STUMBLING STUDES— Pos. Josephine Carraway 4th base Florine Davis _ .water boy Aimer Childers draw back EXCHANGE The BROADCASTER comes from way off in Sisterville, West Virginia. It is published by the Sistervile Junior High School, and is a very original little paper. It seems to have been published for the prupose of raising the morale of the student body. JUNIOR COLLEGE DAME CROWNED WITH RIPE TOMATO Hundreds of spectators applauded, booed, cheered, hissed and jeered as Maggy Squimp was awarded a prize in a local Beauty Contest which was sponsored by the El Stink-a-milo ' Tobacco Co. Maggy is well known among the gas house social circle. Maggy has a warty face, an elaphan- tine body and legs like a piano, but here is how she won the contest. She waltzed out on the stage during the regular Wednesday nigh assembly and literally stole the prize. W. Henson Lemmon well known playboy (and he too will drink root beer without the beer) was introducing the beauties. The first dame that was presented was Vulga Alexander, who was formerly the tatooed lady in a circus. She took out her false teeth, began clicking them together like a pair of castinets and fell into the strains of the Spanish Fandago. Margaret Mangy was the next skirt The JOHNSTON JUDGE, another (synonym for dame, frail, chicken, hen junipnhig h school paper, is published or woman) to get presented to the by the Press Club of Albert Sidney! audience. She went parading across Johnston Junior High. This paper is J the stage ln a nighteown ab"t as grace- running a clever""knowledge" test this! ful as the ^rythmical cow. The au- month that might bring interesting re- \ dience hurled missiles. Miss Mangy suits. The test contains 24 questions, [ saidl all of which pertain to the source of "J have n0 objections to youse guys Houston schools and to members of the \ chunkin tomatoes at me, but please school board. We only wish there was ta^e 'em out of~the cal1"' room to reprint the test in this column. Another paper from far away is PANTHER CUB, published by the University of Pittsburg at Johnston Center. From it we present you the following: The college girl sat on the deck, Eating something by the peck, She says she doesn't pet or neck, But that's a lotta hooie . . ■ The PURPLE PUP from Sidney Lanier is an excellent paper for a junior high school. "Do you always look under your bed before you say your prayers?" asked the flapper. "No, darling," said the old maid, "I always say my prayers first." The PACIFIC STAR, a paper pub- ished at Mount Angel College in St. Benedict, Oregon, is devoted almost entirely to Catholic news. It carries little humor and very few "personals." Smelda Smith was the next "beauty", she went trapesing across the stage but stumbled on hej_ feet. What-a- Melbadelbabelba Right appeared on the scene with a Putrified Screamo in her mouth. She soon discarded this in search of something exciting. We suggest that she try kissing someone with the hiccoughs. The next girl that was introduced was so ugly that she went around haunting houses. Some people are homely but she abused the privilege. She was a blonde, she looked more like a floor mop. She was as ugly as I am (guess who I am. No, not Silas Fry), so et's get back to the prize beauty. Tom Podunk, the fun-loving podunk, these is this. How many four foot, came dashing down the aisle on his yardsticks would it take to measure' kiddie-car. the length of Reuben Belch's foot] "A horse, a horse, my kingdom tor within 3 or 6 little kilometres? Send! 8 norse" he was shouting, your answers in to Aunt Lillian, out-' Donald Aitken (in the balcony and side the editorial office, and we will | trving to he funny, "Will a jackass do?" VOTE IN OUR CONTEST After viewing the simply over^ whelming number of ballots cast in the beauty contest, the Cougar has decided to hold a series of elections over the week end. Elections are our secret passions, just like a rabbit in a greyhound race. We adore them. This year we want to decide a number of things. First among .... cocks jockey —.middle ..mud guard Bradford Dismukes Arthur Burns Curtis Dunk Ernest Cowart __ _.. Virginia Cotten Leo Pyle _ __ chauffeur PROFESSOR PODUNKS- Pos. N. K. Dupre b^ H. W. South._ W. H. Miner ... A. W. French . J. H. Ledlow be glad to use them (to start a fire in the stove.) In the meantime, however, we are asked to remind you of your awful conduct in assemblies. .It has not been as bad as usual, and Mrs. Binder is worried. You are not upholding the standard of the college. Yell louder next Wednesday night. Now we are having a leetle cuntest. De votes dat we git will be posted an the booletin bored in de frunt of Morse Undertaking Parlor, so cast it reel immediately. This is not a phono- graff rekard. Heres de ballut. Warren A. Rees . Fred R. Birney - left out - usher -pallbearer him with confidence to display strength and find him qualified to do it. In other words, his deeds were only deeds of kindness; there was no manifestation of skill or ability. Such a life would be onesided and incomplete. And as I said in the beginning, I want some of the success of the business the the ister, the farmer, and the student I want enough success in business to be able to assist others; success enough in profession to experience results; success enough in religion to be a Christian; success enough in farming to know how it is done and see the bloom of effort; success enough as a student to obtain a good education— to read, write, and think understand- ingly concerning al subjects; success enough in home to be happy and to make others happy; and success enough in society to be respected in my corn- record that the world could call on 1 munity. BALLOT Put a check mark by your favorite candidates name. BIGGEST SISSY Donald McKibben Bill Jeter BEST NECKER (girls only may vote) Leon Green, the Hockerville flash. George (Sooky) Cleveland BIGGEST COCONUT Wilma Lindsey Jeanne Wetherall Marion Adams MOST HOPELESS CASE Rip (Rip) Harrison Adolph Marks WORST NUISANCE Irving Weinstein Raymond Dupre BIGGEST SOT Milford Smith Milford Smith DUMBEST STUDENT George Adams LeFever Jr. (make suggestion) Send your ballot tp the editors. Results will be announced "Yes, Donald, come on down." When the smoke cleared up Char- maine Winterbottom had disguised herself as Maggie Squimp, the mus- tached lady, and grabbed Cy Shaw, the judge, and kissed him. The shock shook the putty off the window-panes. And that, dear students, is how Maggie (Double Ugly) Squimp was crowned (with a blackjack) Queen of Beauty •t the H. J. C, dear old H. J. C. CALL TO ARMS! Hark ye! Harke ye! Hark ye! students of Houston Junior College! More talent is needed for the Dramatic club. Two plays are to be put on "if the proper talent can be obtained. The Dramatic club is open to all students. This means anyone who is carrying three courses or more. One of these Plays is to be sent to the All-State meet. If you are interested and if you are a loyal supporter of school activities Please report to Mrs. Bender at once. SHADOWGRAPHS— (Continued from page 1) Ettafellarow and his daughter Lollypop, lived. Guttaloltanerve w,s _, ,QVC „ith Lollypop. too, but he was fat. Fat made .11 the difference i„ ae worM to a hungry tribe. Something had to be done because Cup.d had already shot his arrow into the heart, of the poor sailor, Noah Jonah Jones, and Lollypop King Ettafellaraw resented and so Guttalottanerve wa, rnade into stew. The reader was Evelyn Ba,hara. King Ettafellaraw . Addison Waestermier L<*™°P Elizabeth Ruthven Noah Jonah Jones Melbadel Wright Guttalottanerve . Arthur Burns Members of the tride were Lalage Slay, Evelyn Cockran, Lillian Schwartz, Carol Wildm.n, and Frances Bates.
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