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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 4, January 13, 1932
File 001
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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 4, January 13, 1932 - File 001. January 13, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/4/show/0.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 13, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 4, January 13, 1932 - File 001. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/4/show/0

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 4, January 13, 1932 - File 001, January 13, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/4/show/0.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 4, January 13, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 4, January 13, 1932
Contributor
  • Marks, A.
Date January 13, 1932
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THE COUGAR PUBLISHED BY THE JOURNALISM STUDENTS OF THE HOUSTON JUNIOR COLLEGE HOUSTON, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13, 1932 NO. 4 DRAMATIC CLASS • TO SEND PLAY TO STATE TOURNEY A one act play will be sent to Waxa- hachie from Houston Junior college to compete with other Junior colleges of the state, according to Harvey W. Harris, Professor of Public Speaking. The play will advertise Houston Jun- ' ior College if it makes a good showing in this contest. "Students of the Public Speaking De- * partment will also be called upon to judge Interscholastic League declamations and debates within this district", Mr. Harris stated. When asked if he expected to cast another play, Harris replied, as only a modest East Texan would, "We would not impose upon our audience's good nature by boring them with another play soon." But don't be surprised if this likeable Prof comes back with a bigger hit than "Why Husbands Go Wrong." COUGARS GET NEWUNIFORMS New uniforms for the H. J. C. basketball squad have been ordered and will arrive next week, according to a statement by Coach Archie W. French. "No games have been definitely ■ matched, but several outside -contests are expected," said Coach French. The new uniforms will be blue and white. Blue trunks and white jerseys - and a cougar on the front will make up the ensemble. The uniforms will be issued to the , following players: Brenham, Gayle, Jeter, Mathews, Pech, Scarborough, Stone, Snider, Taylor, and Weed. COLLEGE STUDENTS FACING TERM EXAMS With the end of the fall term rap- ■ idly nearing its end, final examinations are looming up before students of nearly every institution of learning. For the students of the Houston Junior college, they are very near. Here is the schedule as given out by the office: Examinations will be given in all • classes meeting on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at 4 to 5 and 6 to 7 p.m. on Friday, January 22. Examinations will be given to all classes meeting on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 5 to 6 and from 7;30 to 8:30 p.m. on Monday, January 25. All classes meeting on Tuesdays and Thursdays will take their examinations Tuesday, January 26. Examinations will be given to all classes meeting on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at 8:30 to 9:30 on ' Wednesday, January 27. Students unable to attend examinations because of sickness will be * given the tests for a fee of $1.00, while Students missing for any other reason will have to pay a fee of $2.50. These extra finals will be given February 23, 24, and 25. Students willfully skipping because of examination will not be allowed to take the extra exam and will be graded "F" in the subject. Aha! Me Proud Beauty! Mark an X by your choice. Most Beautiful Sophomore— NELDA SMITH MARGUERITE COMHAIRE MARGARET MOUNGER HULDA ALEXANDER Most Beautiful Freshman RUTH DEPPERMAN WTLMA LINDSAY JEAN WEATHERALL MELBADEL WRIGHT PATSY INMAN \m AUeW-tW To Pfiesenr ^jil Ttie WiNt**n of rue ijfil C0U6AH 0£f\OTY M ce/VTPsr — iv** you till PkSflSK cuMff Forward #1 Miss ki?A Jor/es /$ £>£ A/ftMB'- FAWPON Ml&TxH, PUT WOUkP YO' Ail, CARE To cwTweuTATir 7b &e 0Oo«ER 77 SfAtV6£T WfiSH/N<irt>rt \ ORCfiESTXY FUtfP ?': College Library Has Abundance of Magazines After many long hours of investigation and work, Mrs. Hannah Shearer is publishing the 'following list of magazines and journals that are accessible to Junior College students. The Cougar is pleased to be able to publish it and hopes that you students may derive some benefit from the publications. Whenever you want to find material about some current topic, consult the Readers' Guide and then look into any of tS\% following magazines, periodicals or journals: CURRENT MAGAZINES—HOUSTON JUNIOR COLLEGE Academy of Politcal Science. 'American Journal of Sociology. •American Historical Review. •American Journal of Public Health. •Atlantic Monthly. American Library Ass'n Bulletin. American School Board Journal. Balance Sheet. The Booklist. Bulletin of the Harris County Medical Society. Business Situation. Chemical Education. Chemical Engineering. •Current History. Educational Magazine Guide. Educational Record. Educational Method. Electric Journal. •Elementary School Journal. English Journal. Federal Reserve Bulletin. •Foreign Affairs. •Forum. General Electric Review. •Golden Book. Grade Teacher. Historical Outlook. •Hygeia. Industrial and Engineering Chemistry. Instructor. •Industrial Education. Journal of Engineering Education. Journal of Chemical Education. Journal of Modern History. Journal of Educational Research. Journal of Educational Psychology. •Journal of Political Economy. Junior College Journal. Junior-Senior High School Clearing House. •Libraries. •Literary Digest. •Liberty Journal. •National Geographic Magazine. •New Republic. New York Times Magazine. New York Times Book Review. •Pan-American Magazine. •Political Science Quarterly. Radio News. •Review of Reviews. •School and Society. •Scientific Monthly. •Scribner's Magazine. Social Service Review. Teachers' College Record. The Texas Outlook. •Listed in Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature. QUEER DARKY TO TURN POLICEMAN AH of Houston's late shoppers and early theatre-goers know Dixie; but just who he is and where he came from, nobody knows, not even Dixie himself. With the characteristic good humor of the negro, this 40-year-old man, stunted in body and mind, makes friends with everyone. If he is given a cigarette he will perform almost any antic, and for a cigar he will jig and dance until his clothes are nearly shaken off. Dixie likes the cops—at a distance —he hopes to be one some day, and yet he lives in mortal fear of them. He tells any cop that he happens to meet that they are brothers, that "Big Mike" is their father, and that Chief of Police Percy Heard is his best friend and stand-by. Dixie's decision to become a cop came about through a conversation between Dixie and his favorite cop, and it ran something like this: "What do you intend to be when you grow up, Dixie?" "Well, sah, Ah thinks Ah'l be a cah- pentah." "Why, Dixie, you can't be a carpenter. You dont' know a hammer from a saw." "Yassah, dat's right. Then Ah reckons Ah'll be a prize fight ah." "You can't be that either. You're too little." "Yassah, dats right, too. Ah guess Ah'll have to be a doctah. Ah think Ah'd like to be a doctah." "But you haven't ever gone to medical school, Dixie, so you can't be a doctor." "Well, sah, Ah'd nevah thought o' that. Ah cain't be a doctah, neither. Mebbe Ah could be a lawyah." "But it takes a smart man to be a lawyer." "Looks like you're not fit for much of anything, doesn't it?" "Yassah, shuah does. But iffen Ah an't fitten foah nothin', Ah reckons Ah'll jus' have to be a po-liceman." District 21 To Hold Interscholastic Meet Under HJ.C. Auspices FACULTY MEMBERS ENJOY HOLIDAYS Leave it to the teachers to know how to spend their Christmas holidays peacefully. We students tear around from one place to another, lose sleep, and come back to school with a grouch. Do the teachers do this? Absolutely not ! But Mr. Miller cheerfully admitted that he spent the latter part of his holidays going to parties. He actually stayed out until 3 a.m. New Year's Eve! Mrs. Ebaugh had a very exciting vacation. She left with the Tulane Special from New Orleans, en route to Pasadena, Calif., for the Rose Tournament. At the game she saw many celebrities, among them Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks, Joan Crawford, Douglas Fairbanks Jr. "In spite of defeat, Tulane brought home all of the money," stated Mrs. Ebaugh. Among the teachers who stayed at home in Houston, enjoying the holidays, were Mrs. Soule, Mrs. Bender, Mr. Bishkin, Mrs. Shearer. ?.tr. Schu- man stayed home and played with his youngsters and declared that he behaved himself. Mr. Birney stayed at home wih his wife and the little Birney s. Mr. South spent most of his time trapping birds in the woods. His Christmas was very pleasant, until his dog became seriously sick and had to have an operation. Mr. Harris and his family spent a nice, quiet Christmas in Houston, and on January 1 they drove to Center, a small town in East Texas. Mr. Herrington spent his vacation at home, as he works for the Hughes Tool Company besides being a teacher at the Junior College—and his work had to go on. Mr. Ledlow spent his holidays in his new home with his wife and baby girl. "I enjoyed fishing and hunting on the gulf, and enjoyed my Christmas dinner," stated Mr. Henderson, who stayed in the vicinity of Houston for the vacation. Mr. Hooker and his wife drove to Conway, Ark., for Christmas Day. From there they drove ot Little Rock. Coming back south, they stopped in Paris, Texas, for a short stay with Mr. Hooker's parents. They stopped in Dallas, and then on back to Houston. Henderson, in East Texas, was the quiet little town where Miss Hubbard spent her Christmas. The Kerbows went to Cooper, Texas, and Mr. Keeler spent his vacation in El Paso. Playing the part of Santa Claus, was the way Mr. Rees spent Christmas Eve and Day. He went on a hunting trip to Kerrville, getting no deer, but enjoying a few fox hunts. The Miners took an auto trip through Southern Louisiana. From Crowley, they went north and then took the route eastward to Baton Rouge. They passed through miles of flooded forests in which there was only the highway and railroad out of water. Christmas Day was spent in Baton Rouge. Both were interested in the new cap- itol and the new university buildings of Louisiana. From Baton Rouge, they went on to New Orleans, where they attended some of the meetings of the American Association for Advancement of Science. Historic places in Louisiana were sources of interest for them. They were much pleased and impressed with their trip. Miss Thomason went to her home in Huntsville but had to come back to Houston for her excitement, she declared. Houston was good enough for Miss Mackey, who spent her holidays here Mr. French went to Tennessee and spent the holidays with his family. District 21 of the Texas Interscholastic League will hold its annual meeting in Houston, under the auspices of the Houston Junior College, April 15 and 16, according to an announcement by N. K. Dupre, director general of the district. Plans for the meet were formulated by the executive committee of the district at a meeting held in the Junior College January 5. Competition in academic work will be held at the Junior College. This work includes spelling, declamation, music and art, memory and debating. H. J. C. students will act as judges for these events. A division plan for class A and class B schools will be used in the basketball tournament. The class A teams will be placed in one section and the class B teams in another, with the winner of each division meeting for the district championship. The district track and field meet will again be held at Rice Stadium April 15 and 16. The dates April 22 and 23 were also reserved in case Rice Field is not available on the 15th or 16th. The tennis tourney will be held in conjunction with the track meet, the net events being held on the Rice courts. The class A and class B divisions will also be used in the tennis drawings. Officers of District 21 are N. K. Dupre, assistant dean of Houston Junior College, director general; W. R. Smith of Goose Creek, M. V. Peterson of Rosenberg, Levi Fry of Texas City, E. C. Gates of San Jacinto High school, and H. W. Harris of the Junior College. Member counties of the district are Brazoria, Fort Bend, Galveston, Harris, Matagorda and Wharton. The cities of Galveston, Houston and Goose Creek are also affiliated. THREE BEAUTIES ONCE MAY QUEENS "A favorite dodge to get your story read by the public is to assert that it is true, and then add that truth is stranger than fiction."—O. Henry. Well, truth is stranger than fiction. Every year, just before the students of the public schools are given a summer vacation, the Houston Junior College holds a reception for the high school graduates. At this reception, among other things, the assembled graduates elect one girl of their number as May Queen of the city. Maybe the girls so honored at the receptions of the past three years have a sentimental gratitude toward the college which gave them the honor. Maybe it is merely a coincidence. Anyway these citywide queens of the past three years are all students at Junior College. Moreover, each is a former all-city beauty; each is now entered in the beauty contest sponsored by "The Cougar," school paper, with even chances to win; and all are former students of Sam Houston high school. If anybody is in doubt as to whom this description fits, let him ask for Melbadel Wright, Ruth Depperman and Wilma Lindsay. He will agree that the three belong in the catalog of beauty, and if he has an appreciative eye he will add another feature to their already long list of qualities in common—that they are all three brunettes! Anyway, fill out the ballot in the opposite corner and drop it in Mr. Birney's box in the office.
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