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The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 6, May 1930
File 001
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The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 6, May 1930 - File 001. May 1930. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/29/show/25.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1930). The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 6, May 1930 - File 001. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/29/show/25

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 6, May 1930 - File 001, May 1930, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/29/show/25.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 6, May 1930
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. III, No. 6, May 1930
Contributor
  • Neil, R. E., Jr.
Date May 1930
Language English
Description From masthead: "A monthly newspaper devoted to the interests of Houston Junior College. Published by the Journalism Department, Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THE COUGAR Published by the Journalism Students of the Houston Junior College HOUSTON, TEXAS, MAY, 1930 HISTORY OF JUNIOR D« £ i oiiioTfS PRESIDENT ACCLAIMS COLLEGE IS STORYj -———- PAST YEAR BEST IN OF RAPID GROWTH WT3M HISTORY OF COLLEGE F. M. BLACK The Houston Junior College was established by the Board of Education in the spring of 1927 after conferences with representatives from the State Department of Education, University of Texas, Rice Institute, and Sam Houston State Teachers College. The College opened with a summer session June 5, 1927, in the San Jacinto Senior High School building with a faculty largely recruited from the staffs of the University of Texas and Sam Houston State Teachers College. Two hundred thirty-two students were enrolled for this session and courses were offered in Education, Spanish, English, History, Biology, Art, and Physical Education. The first regular session of the College opened September 19, 1927, with a staff and faculty of twenty-one. During this session, four hundred sixty students were enrolled. Tbe faculty was organized with a view to teaching ability, as well as academic training- Full freshman and sophomore work was offered, special provisions being made for groups preparing for professional courses in medicine, engineering, dentistry, and law. In addition to the splendid library of San Jacinto High School, over two thousand volumes, purchased by the College, were available to the student body. During the year, the work benifc done and the equipment of the Junior College was rigidly inspected by the State Department of Education and the College was fully recognized as a Junior College of the first class, under the law, entitled to full certificate privileges. Later in the year, the College was again inspected by the representatives of the Texas Association of Colleges and, at the meeting of the Association in the spring, the College was recognized as a class A Junior (Continued on Page 4) "I believe that the present term of Houston Junior College has been the most successful since the opening of the school," Dr. E. E. Oberholtzer, superintendent of city schools and president of the college, said today. "I atribute the success of the college to the student spirit of aggressiveness and to faculty devotion and good teaching. These qualities of a college stimulate best effort and result in worthwhile achievements," Dr. Oberholtzer said, when interviewed concerning the present year's work. In discussing the future. Dr. Oberholtzer said that he felt sure that students and parents now appreciate the opportunities offered local boys and girls through offering two years of fully accredited work In a local school. Students who otherwise would PRESIDENT OF JUNIOR COLLEGE j be unab'e to attend any college are Dr. E. E. Oberholtzer is the founder tnus enabled, through attending late Of the idea of having the Houston i classes, to hold a full time position College established here municipally owned plan. He has contributed more than any other official or person in assuring the success of the venture. FACULTY BOASTS OF MANY CELEBRITIES GRADUATING CLASSES OF HOUSTON HIGH SCHOOLS ENTERTAINED IN GYM The Houston Junior College entertained the graduates of the five city high schools Friday evening at their third annual high school reception held at the San Jacinto High School gymnasium. The honor students from the different sehools were guests of honor at the reception. They were introduced to the audience by Mr. N. K. Dupre, assistant dean of Junior College. Miss Ruth Depperman of Sam Hous ton High School won the beauty contest in which the most popular and the most beautiful girl from each high school and the Junior College competed. She was presented with a large bouquet and she led the grand march at the dance. Trial by Jury, a musical farce In one act, was presented by a Junior College cast for the entertainment of those who did not care to dance. The president of the senior class, the most representative student, valedictorian, the most beautiful girl and the most popular girl from each school and the Junior College were the guests of honor. Sam Houston sent Howard Tellep- son as president of senior class, Frances Brandenberger as most representative student, Ruth Depperman as most beautiful girl and Mona Dorothy Mabry as most popular girl. Glenn King, president of senior class, William Harris, most representative student, Lois De Batt, valedictorian, Gertrude Brookings, most beautiful girl and Mary Dodson, most popular girl, were honor guests from Jefferson Davis High School. Reagan High School sent the following students_as honor guests, Joe Williamson, president of the senior class, Mary Eunice Watson, most - (Continued on Page 4) Dr. E. E. Oberholtzer, Ph. B., M. A., LL.D, superintendent of the Houston public schools, is president of the Junior College. Dr. Oberholtzer is noted all over the United States for his progressive and modern educational ideas, and for the great work that he has done in every school with which he has been connected. r. F. M. Black, B.A., is the dean of the Junior College. He has been in the Houston schools for twenty years, and is probably the most respected man in the system. He has always been wise and just in his dealings with the public schools. Mr. N. K. Dupree. M.A., graduate of the University of Texas, is as: ant dean of the college. He Is, i principal of the Montrose Elementary School, and has had more than ten years experience in school work. Mr. H. W. South, bursar of the college, received his B.A. from the University of Virginia. Every student of Junior College has liked Mr. South for b's geniality and kindness. Mrs. F. Lee Duggan, a graduate of the University of Texas, is registrar (Continued on Page 4) in the city and still carry on their Since the establishment of the college, its reputation as a fully equipped, aggressive educational institution has grown constantly. It is rapidly becoming known throughout the South as a school whose graduates make good In the institutions which they attend in completing their four- year course. "Ail in all, I believe that the success of the Houston Junior College is almost phenomenal," Dr. Oberholtzer said. "When the school was established '!"• ' ' ■■ — that it would fill a long felt need. But I am surely pleased with the growth of the school, both in regard to numbers of students, and also as regards the ever-growing reputation which it enjoys. It is today recog nized as one of the outstanding colleges of the country, and ranks at tbe top of the list of junior colleges throughout tbe nation." DEAN OF JUNIOR COLLEGE Mr. F. M. Black, dean of the Houston Junior College, director of the local high schools, and beloved teacher and administrator who has been employed in various positions in the local schools for tbe past 24 years. JUNIOR COLLEGE IS GREAT OPPORTUNITY - DEMOCRATIC SPIRIT The usual college organizations such as dramatic club, debating club, etc., are sponsored by the College. The College prides itself In the fact that the student-body is not divided into social groups. . Every student, whether rich or poor, has the same opportunity to attend social functions sponsored by the college. The college feels that this wholesome democratic spirit among its students is one of its greatest assets. All student organizations must receive the approval of the faculty committee on student activities. It is the purpose of the Junior College to make available to many who might not otherwise have the advantages of college training two years of high grade standard college work; to permit many students who complete high school too young to he sent away to college to have two y^ars of college training at borne and under home influences; to enable adult citizens who have not in earlier years had the opportunity of attending college to do so at home under such conditions as will least interfere with their every-day affairs; to enable teachers already in service to make up certificate or professional deficiencies. In short, it is the purpose of the Houston Junior College to give to Houston and vicinity an institution which shall serve to the very best advantage tbe needs of the citizens of this section of Texas under conditions which make it available to all, and organized and conducted on such a basis as to assure every student two years of high grade standard college training. The work of the Junior College will parallel and be equivalent In every (Continued on Page 4) JUNIOR COLLEGE TO GRADUATE LARGEST CLASS IN HISTORY Commencement exercises for the largest graduating class in the history of Houston Junior College will be held at the San Jacinto High School auditorium at 7:30 p.m. Friday. Selections by the San Jacinto High School Orchestra will open the program. Invocation by Rev. J. F. Kidd will follow the music. Songs will be* sung by a quartet composed of Alpha Adams, Jane Witherspoon, Jack Thur- man and Robert McCullough. Dr. E. 0. Lovett will address the class and Assistant Dean N. K. Dupre will make announcements. The presentation of the class will be made by Dean F. M. Black while President E. E. Oberholtzer will award the diplomas. Selections by the orchestra following the benediction will bring the program to a close. The graduation class, the second since the school was established in spring of 1927, is composed of Helen Eleanor Allnoch, Russell Angell, Gerald Andrew Babcock, Mamie Ross Baty, Margaret Anne Boyett, Howard R. Branch, Helen Naomi Cheney, Ellen Cleveland, A. Francis Crapitto, Lissabelle Crittenden, Florence M. Curtsinger, Loise Rose Dawson, Rev- eris Eaves, Frances Belle Foster, Luman D. Grant, Mary Alice Graves, Mary Frances Harris, Homer Helton, Roy Hill, Madie Lea Hillyer, Rachel Marie Johnson, Ina Ruth Kidd, Donald Lang, Fay Gaddy Ledlow, Paul Le Gros, Grace Vivian McDonald, Josephine Maske. Weldon Lee Med- ders, Summa Frances Moore, Mattle Ivey Neel, Ralph WiUiard Nesmith, Ruth Marie Gardner Newsom. J. W. Newton, Emil Hugo Peterson, Valasta Schulda, Mildred Smith, Patsy Wilson and Sohpia /.ielinski. TEMPORARY HOME OF HOUSTON JUNIOR COLLEGE FORMER STUDENTS TURN BENEDICT IN PAST YEAR; ENTER MARRIAGE REALM Miss Ann Lou Derrick, after teaching a few years, attended college during the year 1927-2S. She took a prominent part in college activities, particularly girls' athletics and the "pep club." After completing the year's work, she was married to Mr. John F. Coffnian, who is in the executive department of the Texas Oil Company. For some mouths Mr. and Mrs, Coffman lived at Port Arthur, but now they are at Amarillo, Texas. Mrs. Coffman is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Derrick, 624 Men-ill street, Houston. Miss Pannie Norman, who is connected with the Woodrow Wilson school, has been attending Junior College the last two years, as well as doing her work in the school. She joined the company of many others who enjoyed the vacation months by beginning the married life. Mr. William T. Wilkerson is the lucky mam He is connected with the Magnolia Petroleum Company. Miss Du Fay Johnson, one of our students, and a graduate of Sam- Houston Senior High School, and Mr. Molman Coyle, another of our students, have given us a surprise by their recent marriage, which took place at Richmond. Rev. T. J. Windham performed the ceremony. Miss Ama Thompson, one of our last year's students, announces her engagement to Mr. V. H. Hayslip, and ihf wedding will take place at the First Methodist church on the 14th ot June. Miss Dorothy Dixon, a graduate ot Sain Houston Senior High School, was in Junior College last year and took considerable interest in college activities, including debating. Last fall she entered Rice Institute, but later was married to Mr. Julian Weisler, an attorney in Houston.
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