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The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 3, January 1930
File 001
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The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 3, January 1930 - File 001. January 1930. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 18, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/24/show/20.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1930). The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 3, January 1930 - File 001. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/24/show/20

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 3, January 1930 - File 001, January 1930, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 18, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/24/show/20.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 3, January 1930
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. III, No. 3, January 1930
Contributor
  • Shepperd, Louise
Date January 1930
Language English
Description From masthead: "A monthly newspaper devoted to the interests of Houston Junior College. Published by the Journalism Department, Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THE COUGAR Published by the Journalism Students oi the Houston Junior College HOUSTON, TEXAS, JANUARY, 1930 IMPENDING CRISIS FACES H.J.C.WITH EXECUTIVES' EXODUS Student Association Hard Hit As Guiding Lights Leave For Other Climes Recents withdrawals from the student body have left the Student Association of Junior College in a critical condition. The chairs of two important offices, those of vice presi dent and secretary, have been vacated by their former occupants, Mr. Fred Weigman and Miss Mary Sadler, leaving only Mr. Branch, president, and Mr. Russ, treasurer, to handle the affairs of the organization. Miss Sadler will enter South Park Junior College at Beaumont, while it is believed that Mr. Weigman intends to return to his home in Germany. But two such important offices of the organization that is the backbone of the Junior College student body could not be allowed to remain unoccupied. So according to a late statement of Mr. Branch, the office of vice president will be filled by Miss Ruth Kidd, who, incidentally, has already proved her capability of filling the same office in the sophomore class. The secretarial chair will be occupied by our popular and well liked friend, Miss Margaret Boyett. Ea'm of these new officers received \otes numbering second to those of the resigned officers in the election early in the term. In order to realize the importance of the new officers, the purpose of the Student Association must be understood. This, as some of us know, is a body composed of the students to serve as a connecting link between faculty and students. In preceding terms the organization has been a great help to the ichool and faculty financially and otherwise, ami being led by leaders of such ability it will undoubtedly continue to do so, now and in the ftuure. As for Miss Kidd and Miss Boyett, wo may rest assumed that they will co-operate with the other officers and do al! in their power to better the association and the school. Announcement The schedule of examinations for Friday, January 17, has been changed slightly. The 4 to 6 p. m. examinations will remain as scheduled, but those announced for 7 to 9 p. m. will be held from 8 to 10 p. m. This change is due to a basketball game between the Cougars and Blinn Memorial College. All students are urged to be present at the game. DATES ANNOUNCED FOR NEW SEMESTER AT JUNIOR COLLEGE Honston Junior College will start its second semester's work on Monday, January 27. New students and those who have attended the Junior College before, but are not now in attendance, will register on Saturday morning, January 25, from 9 to 12 a. m. and Tuesday, January 28, from 4 to 9 p. m. FRESHMAN BALL IS STAGGERING SUCCESS Students Loud in Praise of Froshs' Attempt at Social Endeavor "LONG LIVE THE FRESHMEN"— provided they continue to sponsor such events as the Freshman Ball. That the affair was a huge success is evidenced by the fact that same was called "great" by no less a personage than Smith Garrison, Sophomore president. The Junior College colors, blue and white, were effectively used as a color scheme in the decorations. Punch was served throughout the evening (or night). An informal reception was held with President Oberholtzer and Mrs. Oberholtzer, Mrs. John R. Bender, Junior College dean, and other faculty members in the receiving line. Although the affair was not strictly formal, a majority ot those present were in formal attire. Black was the predominating color In the array of stunning gowns. Frances Eva Smith, Adele Drinkle, Margaret Castle and Alice McCullough were among those attractively gowned in black. Gayle Ruddell (Bob Mc- Cullough's date) wore a stunning model of black and gold. Janes Wltherspoon attracted no little attention in a black velvet frock that set off her blonde loveliness to perfection. "Song of the Flame" might have been the inspiration for Catherine Meyer's ensemble. The dress with drop shoulder effect, was set off by a cocktail cap of gold. Grace McDonald's black velvet dress, made along severe lines, and relieved by a cluster of buds at the shoulder, was the envy of many of the girls. Of course, we can't go into detail about what the boys wore, but we do remember how nice Soapy McGlnty, (Continued on page 3) Old students (meaning those who are now in attendance at the college) will register Monday, January 27, from 4 to 9 p. m. Old students registering after Monday night will be charged a late registration fee. New students and former students will be charged a late fee after Tuesday. The following new classes will be offered during the second semester if there is sufficient demand: Mondays, Wednjesdays , Fridays, English 113, 7:30 to 8:30; Math. 113, 5 to 6; Education 113, 4 to 5; Journalism 113, 5 to 6; Engineering Drawing 113, 6 to 7. Laboratory for the latter course will be offered from 7:15 to 10:15 on Tuesdays. History 113 from 4 to 5:30 and Spanish Aa from 5^0 to 7:00 will be offered on Tuesdays and Thursdays. New sophomore classes to be offered are: English 213, 5 to 6; Education 223E (Elementary practice teaching), 6 to 7; Education 223H (high school practice teaching), 6 to 7 on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, Education 213, 7:15 to 8:45, will be offered. TWO COURSES IN JOURNALISM GIVEN AT JUNIOR COLLEGE Aspirants of Fourth Estate Are Offered Occupation or Recreation Persons interested in writing for profit might profit by entering one of the two courses in Journalism to be offered in Houston Junior College the coming term. For persons who are not sure as to their interest in journalism or other writing, the course in beginning journalism, meeting from 5 to 6 p. m., each Monday, Wednesday and Friday, would probably be best. This is a freshman course, but advanced students and special students may enroll for it. The course deals largely with a study of the way in which newspapers obtain the news. Members of this class will cover events for the Cougar, and students showing ability and zeal will soon be given editorial positions on the Cougar staff. The type of work done in class and on the school paper will prove of interest and great practical value to persons intending to follow any type of writing as a career. Teachers who sponsor, or wish to sponsor, school newspapers, will also find the work of this class of great value. After completing this one term course, any teacher should be able to organize a staff for a school rT^, should be able to direct students in Belling advertising, and should be able to manage a successful subscription campaign. All phases of school newspaper publication will be thor oughly studied. Special Feature Writing Course The second course in Journalism. Special Feature and Magazine Artiele Writing, is usually of greatest interest to persons interested in writing short stories, essay and other feature material to be sold to newspapers and magazines. The course includes a study of feature articles, criticism of stories and articles written by students in class, and direction as to impr ments to be made, and suggestions as to possible markets for stories and other material. Members of this class also work on the Cougar staff, usually as editors and special writers. The training hi class and on the staff usually proves very beneficial to persons wishing to do either professional newspaper work, or those who intend to do their writing as a side line, while keeping a home or following some other occupation. (Continued on Page 2) A Word to the Wise (With Apologies) So study that when thy summons come to join that great caravan which moves to the great halls, where each shall take his finals within those silent halls, thou go not like the foolish student, cramming at night, but sustained and aided by unfaltering knowledge, approach the exams like unto one who wraps the mantle of wisdom around him and sits down to perfect work. NOVEL CAMPAIGN IS SPONSORED BY FIRM Advertisers Are Friends of the Student Body and Make the Cougar Possible Among the best friends of Houston Junior College is W. C. Munn & Co, This company Is continuing to show its interest in our college by offering each month some suitable and val- e prize for the winner of a contest among the students. All receiving THE COUGAR are eligible to vote. Get a copy immediately, cut out the ballot and deposit it in box of the "Who's Who" contest of W. C. Munn &. Co., In the Dean of Women's office. The contest ends Wednesday, Jan. 22, but do not wait until the eleventh hour, but attend to this NOW. The ballots will be counted by an HONEST Board of Judges and the picture of the "Prettiest Girl" Houston Junior College will appear in the next issue of THE COUGAR, together with the announcement of the prize. Don't worry if you are not the "Prettiest Girl" in college, but join in the contest, for next month the contest may be for the most homely boy and you will want your friends to help you win. Then there may be a contest for the best student or one for the biggest "flunk." So come one, come all and in due time you will have fortune come your way. HISTORY OF H.J.C. REVIEWS PROGRESS IN EDUCATION FIELD Increased Enrollment and Addition of New Courses Mark Institution's Growth Houston Junior College, now enrolling 600 students, was established by the board of education in the spring of 1927. After conference with representatives from the State Department of Education, University of Texas, Rice Institute, and Sam Houston State Teachers College. The college opened with a summer session June 5, 1927, in the San Jacinto Senior High School building with a faculty largely recruited from the staffs of the University of Texas and Sam Houston State Teachers College. Two hundred and thirty-two students were enrolled for this first session and courses were offered in Education, Spanish, English, History, Biology, Art and Physical Education. The first regular session of the college opened September 19, 1927, with a staff and faculty of twenty-one. During this session, 460 students were registered. The faculty was, organized with a view to teaching ability, as well as academic training. Full freshman and sophomore work was offered, special provisions being made for groups preparing for professional courses - in medicine, engineering^ dentistry and law. In addition to the splendid library of San Jacinto High School, over two thousand volumes, purchased by the college, were available to the student body. During the year, the work being done, and the equipment of the Junior College, was rigidly Inspected hy the State Department of Education and the College was fully recognized as a Junior College of the first class and under the law, entitled to full certificate privileges. Later in the year, the college was again inspected by the representatives of the Texas Association of Colleges and at the meeting of the association in the spring, the college was recognized as class A Junior College with no reservations whatever. This action means (Continued on Page 2) PARIS DEBATE On Thursday, January 16, 1930, Paris Junior College sends us representatives of their school at debate with Howard Branch and J. W. Newton, the Houston Junior College representatives. Final plans have not been made but is expected that the debate will be held in room 202 so that ah who are interested may come. STUDENT COMPOSER UNEARTHED AT H. J. C. "I intend to study until the hearse backs up to the door for my remains." "To promote a feeling of friendship among all human beings is what I hope to some day help in accomplishing." With these words, Miss Addie Benbow Henderson, social service worker composer, and educator, sums up her aims in life. Miss Henderson, a chemistry student at Houston Junior College, wrote the lullaby, "Lindy-Anne,'' sung in assembly Wednesday night. Endowed with a keen sense of humor, and a personality of unusual charm, this versatile lady has made a host of friends throughout the country. It was due to the efforts of her associates that "Lindy-Anne" was brought before the public. In her early youth, Miss Henderson left home to make her own way and gain an education. A well-trained mind and determination to succeed were her only worldly goods. After taking a business course and gaining practical experience, she obtained a position and started at once to save every spare cent for college funds. However, fate intervened, when she was on the verge of entering college. Circumstances forced the long-fondled hopes into the background, for over six years. But dreams of a college degree were too deeply rooted to be entirely overlooked. Miss Henderson enrolled for several courses at the Peabody Institute in Nashville, Tenn., and after working eight hours a day in an office, spent hours at night preparing lessons. To her, "Education" was "Recreation." During this six year period, the student studied expression, later earning her livelihood as a teacher in this field. When financial matters were again remedied, Miss Henderson attended S. M. U. at Dallas, where she was awarded her B. A. degree. A fellowship at the same university allowed her to obtain her Master's degree. In addition to her duties as secretary to various members of the S. M. U. faculty, Miss Henderson found time to take active part in the Arden Dramatic Club at S. M. U. As a teacher, Miss Henderson spent some time In New Mexico as well as Texas. She was a member of the faculty at East Texas State Teachers College. Her travels have taken her from coast to coast. A picture of Santa Claus giving a Christmas dinner to the "Leftover? was MisL Henderson's inspiration f> social service work. The portrait wi received during her childhood, anJ affected her so deeply that she later adopted the work. In Dallas, Miss Henderson was supervisor of the Faith Home. Prior to coming to Houston last June, she was engaged in social service work In Dallas. At present Miss Henderson Is in the employ of the City of Houston Social SerticO Department. An athletic looking young woman, with boyish bob, and fasclnatiu^ :«mile —that's Miss Henderson, or "Bunch, as she is affectionately callei by her associates. BOOKLETS TO CONTAIN GRADES AND RECORD OF H. J. C. STUDENTS Students of Junior College will be given their grades at the end of this term in new "Complete Record of Work" booklets, according to Mrs. Kathleen Rucker Duggan, registrar of the college. Not only this term's grades, but all previous grades and entrance credits will be shown, and the books will become the permanent property of the students. The booklets are similar to those used by all large colleges and universities and will fill a need of long standing. The cover of the books carries the name of the student, below which Is printed "Houston Junior College." The second page sets forth the following purposes of the book: 1. To keep the student himself In. formed at all times about his entrance credits and college courses. For this information he will be held responsible. 2. To aid the registration committee. Student must present his complete record each time he enters the college. 3. To give Information to members of the faculty with whom the student may wish to confer about his work. He must present it to add or drop a course. 4. It is not a credential. A student wishing to enter another Institution should ask the registrar's office for an official transcript of his records and name the Institution to which he expects to go. (Continued on page 2)
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