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The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 2, December 1929
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The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 2, December 1929 - File 001. December 1929. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 18, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/196/show/192.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1929). The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 2, December 1929 - File 001. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/196/show/192

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 2, December 1929 - File 001, December 1929, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 18, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/196/show/192.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 2, December 1929
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. III, No. 2, December 1929
Contributor
  • Shepperd, Louise
Date December 1929
Language English
Description From masthead: "A monthly newspaper devoted to the interests of Houston Junior College. Published by the Journalism Department, Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THE COUGAR Published by the Journalism Students of the Houston Junior College HOUSTON, TEXAS, DECEMBER, 1929 FOOTBALL DANCE SET FOR FRIDAY FRESHMAN BALL IS ANOTHER BIG EVENT SCHEDULED AT H. J. C. River Oaks To Be Scene of Merriment on Eve of January 3rd The 1929-30 Freshman class will hold the first Junior College Fresh, man ball at the River Oaks Country Club, Friday evening, January 3, from 10:00 p. m. until Z. This affair will be the first of a series of annual Freshman balls and is expected to be one of the most successful dances of the new year. The chairman of the decoration committee has planned to decorate in the school colors, blue and white. The hall will be a mass of blue ana white streamers, and the background for the orchestra will be a large blue and white satin drop. An added attraction of the evening is that the music will be furnished by the "Collegians," one of the best and most popular "Hotter than Hot" orchestras of the city. There will be only a limited number of outside bids sold. Those desiring to obtain bids may do so by communicating with any freshman of the Houston Junior College, or from their president, Robert McCullough. Freshman class officers who are helping to make the dance a success are: Robert McCullough, president; "Lefty" Morris, vice-president; Adele Drenkle, secretary and treasurer, and II. W. Harris, sponsor. The committees are: Hall and Or. chestra, S. E. McGinty, chairman, Wayne Phelps and Caloma Powers; Decoration, Adele Drenkle and Max Ludtke; Refreshment, Terry Rusk, Maurine Edminster and Edna Bowen, Bids, Robert McCullough and Terry Rusk. COUGAR COLLEGIANS GIVE BRIDGE PARTY FOR ATHLETIC FUND The Cougar Collegians entertained on the afternoon of December 1 with a benefit bridge at the University Club. Funds received from the sale or tickets are to go to the athletic fund of the school. Not only are the teachers, girls, and their mothers there, but quite a few boys joined in the games. To further entertain the players a program was given by Doris Van Demark and Willie Kessler, and Bobby McCullough, accompanied by Ruth Kidd. The success of the party was due not only to the untriing efforts of the club's president, Ruth Kidd, but also to the University Club, which donated its ballroom for the party, and the various merchants of the city who donated prizes. Prize awarded were: girls' hign score, a necklace to Portia Cleves; boys' high score, a bill fold; to J. W. Newton; girls' booby prize, a box ot candy to Dorothy Dixon; boys' booby prize, a coin pu.'se, to Bobby McCullough; girls' floor prize, flowers, to Margaret Boyett; boys floor prize, to Weldon Meadows. Despite the fact that there was an important football game at Rice Field, several football boys joined the group at the party. As a result, a special football boys' prize was awarded to Donald Lang. Committees who were in charge of the party included: Ruth Kidd, general chairman; Alice McCullough, tickets; Lois Dawson and Helen Allnoch, candy; Grace McDonald, ana Isabella Crittenden, tables. 'Scholia' Is New Club at H. /. C. Among the new clubs making their appearance this season at the Houston Junior College is The Scholia, a professional educational society, organized under the sponsorship of Mr. Henderson and Mr. A. F. Kerbow of the Education Department. Meetings are held on alternate Mondays at 3 p. m. Officers elected for the term are: President, Margaret Anne Boyett; vice president. Lissabelle Crittendon; secretary-treasurer, L. J. Christian- son, and reporter, Zelda Amdur. In its nature the) society presents three aspects—namely, the professional, the fraternal and the honorary. Its purpose is to support the highest educational ideals and to encourage an unswerving allegiance to those principles underlying American public education. The Scholia exists for the mutual help of men and women who are engaged in the scientific study of education. Membership is made up of two classes-—active and associate. Active membership is limited to the students of the Houston Junior College who have a record of C on all regular registered courses. Faculty members or ether students of education who have comp'eted four courses cf education may become associate members. Those interested are invited to be present at the meeting of the society. FROSH-SOPH MELEE DRAWS BIG GATE Pastel shades are quite the thing for swanky weddings -hut on the gridiron—not so hot. Purple, white, orange, yellow, blue, green, black and red jerseys paraded up and down the field. We say jerseys because we are modest. Persona ly though, we think grandpa did without his red flannels so sonny boy could play in the Soph-Fresh melee. And a certain blue shirt (so we are told) was hastily rigged out from mother's Sunday petticoat. What a break those Sophs got when Bill Jeter was unable to play in the Blinn game. His uniform was distributed among six members of the victorious Soph gang. Joe Cain, freshman center, was nat- (Continued on Page 2) TIME TO FORM GOOD HABITS—IN COLLEGE SAYS H. J. C. DEAN F. M. Black Addresses Assembly On Formation of Habits In College F. M. Black, dean of Junior College, stressed the formation of habits in college, in his address to the weekly assembly of Junior College students Nov. 13. "No matter why you are going to college, your ultimate ambition while there should be to form habits. By forming habits I mean doing everything by certain rules set up. Do things that ought to be done in the way that they ought to be donn. '■There are four habits that 1 would like to impress on your mind. First, the habit of facing facts without fear. This is one of the most difficult tasks that everyone has. It not only applies to students in college, but to men and women as well. But while you are in college and are forming habits, the habit of facing facts without fear should be well remembered. "Second, the habit of concentration. Concentration is a power which it is very necessary to cultivate. Without the power of concentration, one cannot get nearlv as far as those* who possess it. When you are doing a thing, concentrate on it, do it well, and finish it, before undertaking another. The habit of not jumping at conclusions, is the third point that I want to bring out. The habit of jumping at conclusions is a common one among students and people the world over. Remember.young people, always weigh the conditions when it is possible. "The habit of broadmlndedness is a habit which should be cultivated by everyone. Broadmindedness is a necessary element in all types of society, and there is perhaps no place where It is more possible to learn it than in college. "So in conclusion, I wish to say that if you will remember these habits that I have listed, if you will think about them and apply them to yourself, you will get a great deal more out of college than if you come here to be able to say that you have been through college, to gain social prestige, or to clear away book-Ignorance." Students JVork at Divers Occupations Fifty and four-fifths per cent of the students in Junior College are earning their entire way through college and forty and four-fifths per cent are taking the entire five courses. This means that slightly over half of the students enrolled here are earning their own living. Divers means are used by these students to pay their living expenses while attending school. The majority who attend, and who are entirely on their own resources, are teachers in the city schools, both public and private. Among us is a first aid doctor in one of the large oil refineries of the city; several pre-med dentists, a licensed girl air pilot—one of the only two in tht city. These are a few unusual occupations, but students of Houston Junior College do almost anything to obtain funds. Some wash windows, and some clerk in grocery and dry goods stores. Many are stenographers and comp- lometrists. One boy is an undertaker's assistant and one drives a bus for the Houston Electric company. Those who earn money as soda clerks and filling station clerks are well rep- tesented as well as thoae vho have one or several paper routes. STUDENT INVENTORY OF PAST JEW YEARS Many students have come to Junior College in these three years since the school was opened, and many have gone. Many have come and stayed—as, f'r instance, BILL JETER. Bill was president of the Students' Association last year and he's a great football player, but the chief thing we remember him for is his almost shadow-like ability to pick out one girl and follow her around for there or four months.i We would mention names, but the feelings must be considered of one . MISS MILDRED SMITH. Then there's OPAL BEANE, who has been here three years, too. She's as much a part of Junior College as (Continued on Page 4) BIG TIME PLANNED FOR H. J. C. STUDENTS AT UNIVERSITY CLUB Proceeds from Dance to Buy Football Sweaters for Cougar Gridmen Houston Junior College's first annual Football Dance is scheduled foi Friday night, December 20, at the University Club. With bids selling for (1.00 and the Collegians Dance Orchestra furnishing "hotter than hot" music, the occasion is expected to be one of the best college dances of the season. This dance will be the first affair undertaken by the Student Asssocta- tlon this year. Immediately following their election, the officers of the association, headed by President Howard Branch immediately began plans for an immense "get-together" of the college students, the proceeds to be used to purchase sweaters for the football team. Assisting the Student Association officials in preparations for the dance are Smith Garrison and Robert McCullough, presidents of the Sophomore and Freshman classes respectively. These two gentlemen are held responsible for having every member of both class organizations present for the dance, and latest reports have it that they wiH pack the h»H, College Life —A Student Viewpoint By GEORGE LANAUX I. "The best thing about going to college is the social life." II. "The best thing about going to college is the applied ntudy." III. "The best thing about going to college is the broadening of character and personality." Here are three different anfl distinct notions of college graduates about the benefits of their four years in college. And yet. the first one says: "I have had more fun since I left college." Graduate No. 2 says: "My thoughts are de**pnr since my graduation." Tlie last mentioned college man goes so far as to tell us that he has met more people, studied human nature, and broadened his understanding more since he finished at the university. After conversing with these three college men I saw that striking the happy medium in the attitude of "col- legiates" toward life in general was not by any means an easy task. Approaching the subject from the "business man's" standpoint offered easier possibilities, and it did not take me long to ascertain the fact that business mon have that which college students lack—responsibility. II. At first I thought this quite natural, considering the youth of university students, but it wag soon made clear that even the youngest of business men, namely the 13-year-old office boy, is more responsible, takes things more seriously, than the average rah- rah boy. But do not think for an instant that this lack of responsibility on the part of the college man is a fault. The very nature of its cause proves that it is not. The business man is capable of seeing only one side of a subject— his viewpoint is very pointed; he sizes up a situation from one angle only. On the other hand the man broadened and educated by college life is able to see around the corner—he looks at a thing from every possible angle; his understanding is unimpaired. To show you exactly what I mean, I want to quote for you the words of a friend of mine in the business world concerning the "pep" and the "spirit" of collegiates. You will be readily able to understand the business man's viewpoint—his one-sided stubborn outlook from this: "I am certainly disappointed in Junior College. I thought that it was a place where one could go to learn something, but I guess it will end up in a lot of silliness after all." And, to top it all, the college man beats the business man at his own game, even if it does take him longer to get there. The employment agent of a large corporation recently informed me of the difference between the working boy and the college boy when both were placed on the same job. The working boy does the job-- he does it thoroughly; he does it well. The college boy does the job; he does it thoroughly; he does it well, and he is able to see exactly what part he is playing in the business function —he knows what went before, he understands what will transpire as a later result. It is this that makes the college man, who starts In just as lowly a position, forge ahead of his workng friend. Many accuse the college man of being restless; they say he will not stick to the job, but I contend that a restless nature is not the cause of numerous changes of position. One time out of ten you'll find that the college man feels his importance as a university graduate and is not willing to accept and stick to the menial job which he must take, but the other nine times you will find out that the cause for numerous changes is that fault—If you want to call it that—ambition. The college man's viewpoint shows (Continued on Page 2) DRAMATIC CLUB TO STAGE 'NOT SO BAD' AS INITIAL PRODUCTION "Not So Bad," a comedy that derives its humor from the caprice oi a group assembled in a mountain: lodge for a week end party, will be the first production of the John R~ Bender Dramatic C ub. With many practices already behind them, the cast is "polishing off" the rough edges, and will be ready to display Itself to advantage when the play Is presented shortly after the holidays-. The play is being staged under the excellent direction of Mrs. Lillian Blocker, who for the past year has so willingly helped the college in presenting its productions. Mrs. Bender, the club's sponsor, is assured of the success of the play. "I know that, with the excellent material and direction, the play will be- a grand success," Mrs. Bender said. The cast of the comedy is as fol- Mrs. Markham, Grace McDonald; Mrs. Hobbs, Ruth Kidd; James, H. K. Foreman; Kitty Ransom, Alice McCullough; Harriet Wilson, Marie Coppin; Louise Markham, Hazel Taylor; Ethel Griseom, Celia Lesky; Willard Hazard, Robert Nesmith; Jimmy Tweed, Roy Hofheinz; Morris Hunter, S. Cowley; Mr. Markins, Milton Super, Mr. Betts, Francis Hinton; Edwara, John Hinton; Sophy, Zelda Amdur; Bridget, Irene Cafcalas; Nora, Genevieve Weldon. INSTRUCTOR ASKED FOR ABSTRACT FROM THESIS N. K. Dupre, assistant dean of Junior College, has been asked to contribute an abstract from his thesifc on "The Teaching of Hygiene and Sanitation" to the Science Education. Magazine. He was asked to supply about a 12- page typewritten article. The Science Education Magazine is under the supervision of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, anal Is published by Puper, Whitman and; Glenn.
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