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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 11, May 6, 1931
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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 11, May 6, 1931 - File 001. May 6, 1931. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/176/show/172.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 6, 1931). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 11, May 6, 1931 - File 001. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/176/show/172

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 11, May 6, 1931 - File 001, May 6, 1931, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/176/show/172.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 11, May 6, 1931
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 11, May 6, 1931
Contributor
  • Kendall, Everett
Date May 6, 1931
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THE COUGAR Published by the Journalism Students oi the Houston Junior College High School Reception May 8 HOUSTON, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 1931 LOCAL ORATORS LOSE THREE TO RIVAL DEBATERS Westminster Sends Boys' Team and South Park Sends Girls and Boys OUR GIRLS ARE CHAMPS Drenkle and Cafcalas Debate Roberson and Fife in Auditorium Tough Luck recently cast a disapproving eye on efforts of H. J. C. students to defeat debating teams from Westminster Junior College in Tehuacana, and from South Park Junior College in Beaumont. La Roy Dorsette and Kenneth Cope- land of Westminster J. C. defeated Phil Hamberger and Gordon Jones in the music room at 9:30 p.m. Friday, April 10. Westminsters girls' team was unable to make the trip, and ceded the district championship to H. J. C, Miss Margaret Pitcher is debate coach at Westminster. The boys' debate and the girls' debate were scheduled contests of the Texas Junior College Public Speaking Association. Four orators and the debating coach, Mrs, Fred Fonville, of South Park J. (Continued on Page 2) INNOCENT LITTLE GIRL, FRESH FROM COUNTRY, FOILS SEDUCTIVE SHEIK Your Cougar now has its own confessions department. Even the "hardest boiled" reader ought to get six or eight heart throbs out of the following touching little confession from one of our charming co-eds: "Neck?" he asked in a low, seductive voice. I did not know what to answer; I am a girl shy by nature and slow to accept what other girls eagerly and openly rush to take up. As-a result I did not have the experience with which to cope with his proposal. I was perplexed as to what to reply. I could do nothing but remain seated in em- barassed silence. Again he asked, "Neck?" Though his tone was as soft and alluring as before, it had an added throb of Imperiousness that could not be overlooked. I was. keenly aware now that I could not delay much longer. He looked at me quest ion ingly. There was no way out other than to make a hasty decision. "Yes," I replied recklessly. "Only you must be careful not to shave it too close. If you do it's bound to tickle unbearably when I put on my coat with the fur collar." LIBRARY DEFINED BEFORE TEACHERS "A reading teacher and a library in every elementary school has been Beaumont's aim," declared Superintendent M. E. Moore of that city in his talk to the Library Section of the South Texas Teachers' Association at their luncheon in the Rice Hotel Friday at noon. Supt. Moore described the elementary library as an informal place full of light and color with furniture to fit the small people. The planning of the daily program should be made to include time for independent reading in the library. In the junior high school, Library is a subject like mathematics or English and requires a teacher just as the other subjects. The library in the junior high school includes books, magazines and newspapers selected by the students. "There has been too much censorship," stated Supt. Moore. The senior high school library should be a large room with work room for librarians and assistants. In connection with the senior high school library is a class room where freshmen are taught the use of the library, where certain students are taught how to read, where committees work, and where others make use of it. Superintendent Moore advocates the departmental library where the multiple copy makes supplementary reading accessible to the whole class ot once. According to Supt. Moore the library is becoming more and more important as the methods of teaching evolve, Supt. Moroe was introduced by Dr. E. E. Oberholtzer, Superintendent of Houston schools. The orchestra of the San Jacinto Senior High School fur- ished the music. —1^~~ .,_— 0pEN your EYES TO THE i LOVE AND THE LIFE AND THE GOD ALL ABOUT YOU Here is something from the pen of Evelyn Cochran which makes one pause and think. It is called: VIDEO I see love laboring; the mother for her wayward, unseeing child; friend for friend; man for his mate. I see truth, blinding in its beauty. I see lies, blinding in their garishness. I see bare feet bathing in a sparkling stream, with piles and piles of glistening sand. I see gnawing hunger, and thirst, and nakedness in the city streets. I see thousands and thousands of glittering windows of gold as the Sun awakens a Dream City in the greyish - lavender mist of morning. I see jagged flashes of lightning that thrill. I see violets hiding beside a fallen giant I see gaunt, bearded warriors braving the loneliness of the forest in win- Miss Weldon was elected the "most popular girl" in the contest sponsored by the Cougar Collegians. POETS UNDERSTAND BUT WE MERELY SEE NATURE Interesting thoughts on life, worthy of contemplation, are given in the following essay by an H. J. C. student of English: Life is a swift revolution of beauty, tragedy, hope, fear, anxiety, indulgence, sacrifice—in general, a condensed .complicated matter, and because of the alacrity with which it revolves, we have but fleeting glimpses of its different aspects. Our conception o£ everything about us is so obscure and so inconsistent that we merely grope along, like the blind creatures that we are, incomprehen- sive of the full significance of our existence. There are only a few things, our hobbies, which attract, and hold for an indefinite time, our attention, while all else, however beautiful, is meaningless. We are blind, deplorably blind. Why do we not have the same emotional feelings about a certain matter as our neighbor? Why do we look upon a seemingly barren mountain as a mere elevation of land, when he looks at it as a mighty,mass of grandeur and splendor? Why do we regard highly classical music monotonous and irritating when to him it speaks volumes? Ah! It is misunderstanding! Blindness! Our lives are molded, more or less, along commercial rather than along literary lines. So commercialized are we becoming that even our mode of speech betrays us; we usually express ourselves in quick, unfigurative terms. Nor do we take a few moments to meditate on a matter outside of our routine—that is considered as idling away precious time. Hence, we are deprived of developing a keener sense for the beautiful; something we do not understand, yet, which we might understand if we only sought it out. With what reverence the poet looks at a scene of nature! How inspiring it is to him! Certainly Shakespeare felt (Continued on Page 2) OUTGOING CLASS ELECTS OFFICERS J. C. graduates organized the graduate class and elected officers April 17, when they met to get grad uate functions under way. Officers elected were Harold Wood, j president: Nelwyn Turner, vice presi- I : Uozelle McReynolds, secre- urer. Class pins have been selected and numerous activities are being planned, according to Harold Wood, president. Mr. Wood stated that the graduates intend to make merry at a bay party scheduled to take place May 28; Whether or1 not the bay party is to be only for graduates has not yet been decided. ''We are going to issue invitations, for commencement," stated Mr. Wood, "and this will be the most outstanding affair of the sort that Houston Junior College has yet seen." Mr. Wood was reluctant to discuss minor details of the commencement exercises but intimated that adequate committees have been appoinled to attend to the matter. "The graduates will take charge of the last assembly of the semester," Mr. Wood further remarked. "As yet we know that dislinctive class pins are being decided upon, that we shall have quite a unique . commencement*, am" that wo are going to have a real bay party. Further questions will be de cided at our next meeting." I see little baby leaves heralding the coming spring. . I see the night, kind and soothing, oblivious of all that is harsh and ugly. I see a life beyond. And everywhere I see God. —Evelyn F. Cochran. ANOTHER H. J. C. GIRL FOUND IN HIGHER-UPS . ..Miss Edith Lord, Houston Junior College student is a member of the Van Hoose Little Symphony Orchestra, composed of professional players. Miss Lord plays the Viola. Houston Junior College may rightfully be proud of its many accomplished students. STUDENTS TO SUPPORT WOODUL'S SENATE BILL Senator Walter Woodul's senate bill No. 422 is up for consideration in the state legislature this week. This bill will, if passed, mean much to H. J. C. and Houston. All students are urged to write their representatives at Austin7; asking that they support the bill. Letters favoring the bill should also be written to Senator Woodul, and Roy Holder, chairman of the house educational committee. John Brown's Body Brings Mystery to H. J. C. Halls Gruesome indeed was this report sent out last week by our librarian, Mrs. Shearer: "John Brown's Body disappeared from the library last summer before it could be indexed." Regarding it one bright student said: "Just Imagine, the body may be wandering about the halls of the college—unnoticed among throngs of students. A few tactful questions addressed to Mr. Vanzee might disclose some clue as to its whereabouts." POPULAR NOVELS NOW HERE, SAYS LIBRARIAN Mrs. Hannah Shearer, H. J. C. librarian, announced Wednesday the arrival of a new shipment of book: She called especial atention to a Chemical Encyclopedia" and an "Encyclopedia of Social Sciences," the first two volumes only in each set being available as the entire works have not as yet been published. Among the new fiction to be found on the shelves are the following: "Hans Frost" by Hugh Walpole. "The Woman of Andros" by Thornton Wilder. "The Great Meadow" by E. Madox Roberts. "Clarissa Harlowe" by Samuel Richardson. "Swan Song" by John Glasworthy. "Uncle Sam" by John Erskine. ''Victory" by Joseph Conrad. "The Deepening Stream" by Dorothy Canfield. "Forever Free" by Honore Willsie Morrow. "Cimarron" by Edna Ferber. "Exile" by Warwick Deeping. "Long Bondage" by Donald Joseph. "Angel Pavement" by J. B. Priestly. "Hudson River Bracketed" by Edith Wharton. "A Lantern in Her Hand" by B, . Aldrich. FOURTH ANNUAL RECEPTION TO BE HELD HERE MAY8 H. J. C. Students to Entertain All Graduates of Houston Senior High Schools EDUCATOlf¥lLL SPEAK Welcoming Address To Be Given In Auditorium by President E. E. Oberholtzer Senior high school graduates have been invited to attend the annual reception, given them by the students of the Houston Junior College, in the auditorium here Friday evening at 8:30 p.m., May 8. AH arrangements have been completed including the distribution of bids at the various high schools in the city. Mr. Dupre, the assistant dean, will make the introduction. President E. E. Oberholtzer is to give the welcoming address. Tbe queen of the reception will be elected and bouquets presented her by the Phi Honor Society. The grand march is to be led by the queen-elect and S. W. Garrison, president of the Junior College Student Association. 'Previous receptions," said Mrs. (Continued on Page 2) ELECTION RETURNS Miss Maurine Edminster was elected most beautiful girl, and Miss Genevieve Weldon the most popular girl at Junior College at the election held Monday. These co-eds will represent H. J. C. at the annual reception for high school graduates to be held May 8. Examination Blockade Is Broken by Brawny Janitor Outside looking in, and inside looking out, was the experience of students of Journalism 123, Monday night, April 20, when the door of room 210 became locked. As a test was scheduled for that night, students were not particularly interested in getting the door unlocked, and in fact were quite open in expressing their wishes of keeping the door permanently closed. But alas, all good things must come to an end. A rescuer in the form of our brawny janitor came to the aid (of Mr. Birney, not the students) and opened the door to the classroom and a test. OLD FABLE TOLD IN CHAPEL TALK Assembly Wednesday night, April 22, was. the ozcaeiiM of an address to the student body of E. P. Neilan of the Houston Land and Trust Company. Mr. Neilan was the winner of the re-. cent American Institute of Banking' Oratorical.contest. The subject of his talk was "Diamonds in Your Own Back Yard." The story involves the tale of a rich and satisfied Oriental farmer. One day he is told of the wealth and fascination of a diamond by a Buddhist priest that came to see him. When the priest had gone on his way the thoughts of conversation still lingered in the mind of the farmer. Eventually, he sold his wonderful farm, left his wife and family, and went in search of this, marvelous jewel. The man who bought his farm was very frugal and did all that he could to improve his status in life. One day found a glittering piece of stone the back yard, and thinking that it was merely a piece of pretty glass he brought it in and placed it on the mantel. When the Buddhist priest stopped by on his next visit he asked the man where he had obtained the diamond. The man was very much surprised on learning this as he did, not even know what a diamond was. Far away on the coast of a sunny sea an old beggar threw himself into the blue waters to die. It was the old farmer who in his searchings for the diamond had at last given up the fight. (Continued on Page 2) MRSi MERCER INJURED Mrs. Ethel Mercer, H. J. C. student, was painfully injured April 12, at Galveston. Mrs. Mercer was walking on the jetty when she stepped on a slippery rock and fell, breaking her ankle. KERBOW'S CLASS PLANS DRAMA OF CLASSROOM Plans for the dramatization of the old and new classroom proceedures are being worked out by the Education 123 classes of Professor Alva Kerbow, to, be given in the assembly entertainment period. Group two is taking the old method of conducting classes with its switches, memory work, and old-fashion teachers. The new socialized plan of school will be presented by group two. The contrast of the two methods will show the development of schools from the days of "the ole' swimming hole." The definite date for the presentation has not been set.
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