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The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 3, April 1929
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The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 3, April 1929 - File 001. April 1929. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/154/show/150.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1929). The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 3, April 1929 - File 001. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/154/show/150

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 3, April 1929 - File 001, April 1929, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/154/show/150.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 3, April 1929
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. II, No. 3, April 1929
Contributor
  • Seaman, Harry
Date April 1929
Language English
Description From masthead: "Published Monthly by Journalism Students. Official Publication of Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THE COUGAR Published by the Journalism Students of the Houston Junior College TOX, TEXAS. APRIL, 1929 ANNUAL DANCE FOR JUNIOR COLLEGE IS HOT AS FIRECRACKER Plenty Hey-Hey Created When Studes Congregate at Kensington Joy written on the face of every Junior College student and faculty member who glided over the slick floor to the dreamy strains of music pouring from the orchestra pit. All the music was not dreamy. Some of it was just wicked enough to make the dancers feel inebriated. Everybody had plenty of chance to execute all hot steps they knew. And just when they might feel all out of breath, the orchestra would break into a more conservative popular melody so that the couples could talk. The musicians did not play anything but the best of the latest popular music, and they outdid themselves. If everything had been as god as the music the dance would rate one hundred per cent. And everything was, almost. The Kensington floor is heavenly to dance on. Heavenly because the golden streets are certainly no slicker. One can glide and slide on them with the greatest of ease and rythym, and during intermission one can walk across them without slipping down. And then everybody was so happy! No, not because of what you are thinking—they were just happy. In the first place, it did not hurt anybody's feelings—not even the faculty's—to miss that last late class. And then it was a beautiful night and a lovely drive out to Kensington, and—well, why shouldn't ihey all feel good? There were many very attractive dresses worn by co-eds, faculty ana wives of the faculty. Evening gowns were in the majority. Miss Huberic's was a very becoming green taffeta. A long black velvet worn by Mis3 Mary Elizabeth Riggs, and a quaint equally long white satin worn by another popular co-ed were the most outstanding on the floor. The white beaded creation of Miss Nancy Wilson's looked like a Parisian model— or rather she looked like the model. There were some very chic street frocks worn also. Too bad we cannot comment un the clothes worn by the shieks. Hope they do not feel leu out. It was not the stove burning in the center of the hall that made the dance hot. No one would have missed the stove if it had not been there. People did congregate around it, but only because of its central location. Nor was the financial success the sole rea'sou that everybody had a good time. But everybody did, and if you did not g- ask somebody what you missed, and if yon did go, are you still wondering why you enjoyed it so much? What we want is more dances, since they can't be bigger and better. Rehearsa's for "At the End of the Rainbow," three-act play to be presented by the John R. Bender Dramatic Club, under the direction of Mrs. Lillian Blocker, were started Thursday night. Tryout for parts were held March 25, and the following cast selected: Richard Speed, Robert Moechel, Wil- . Morrow, Pat Quinn, Richard Ragland, Bryan Sadler, Gertrude Beard, Ailleen Pickett, Helen Davis, Bernice Newton, Stella Calotta, Portia Cleaves, Faye Ledlow, Mary Elizabeth Bigg, Anna Ray Qualtrough, Alpha Adams, Louise Forrest, Helen Hume, Grace Mc Donald, and Shelly Jordon. Without Comment The corpse is slowly coming lo life. H. J. C, spirit which died a natural death way back in November Is reviving. Doctors report that soon small spoons of Eagle Brand Condensed Milk with a cake crumb, can be given it. The faculty started work on the body at the beginning of the spring term. The corpse was brought to Assembly and given injections of a certain substance commonly called "pep." So far the experiment has been a success—but it has a long way to go. The doctors are going to work until the two-year old dauhter of our dear student-body can walk to Assembly alone. On to higher grades. That seems to be the motto of most students since absences are checked carefuly. Teachers report that classes are well attended and that grades are higher. Maybe, oh, maybe, there will be a time when there are no failures an no Coming Drama to Cast Local Material of No Mean Histrionic Ability KING BASEBALL IS USHEREDJN AGAIN Here, There and Everywhere National Pastime Is Popular Baseball lias broken into the ranks of athletics as the national pastime for another season. Speaking of national pastimes do you know what the principle sport is, in the Phillipine,s? Well it's baseball. Just as the game is in our own country, it holds the attention of everyone. Last year the Phillipines imported a bunch of players to this country and went on a barnstorming tour. Prom the class of players that were on the tour, the Phillipines must be a very adept p"eo- ple at throwing the horsehide- Who knows but what we will some day be playing baseball in an International League, making all trips by air? Well it sounds impossible, but Lindbergh performed an impossible task. Gettin away from this high hat subject we will see if we can find out what our own baseball team is doing. This year looks more promising for the Junior College tossers every day, with the arrival of new recruits on the diamond. Manager Bilao has been working with the candidates for the last few days. Men who are out for the team are: Bilao, Blair, Sadler, Warden, Banks, Wiseman, Yelverton, Jeter, James, Aleo, and Joues. COACH ANNOUNCES COUGAR LETTERMEN IN MAJOR SPORTS Nineteen Grid and Six Cage Letters Are Awarded Athletes With the football dance over, and the necessary coin rolling in, our athletes are taking the spotlight again. This means that the lettermen have been announced, and all that remains undone is the banquet. Coach Smith announces that nineteen letters are to be awarded and four men will receive reserve letters for their untiring efforts. The men who are to receive letters are: "Red ' Elmick, "Jug" Reynolds, Ken Jones, Byron Sadler, Bill Jeter, Harry Wood*, 'Dopey" Richards, Wallace, Nick Peet, ■Wally" Banks, "Black" Klaros, Richard Ragland, John Kuritza, Waiter Scarbrough, Wendell Ley, "Ted" War- "Skipper" Boyd, and "Deacon" Reeves. These men were all mention- lettermen, but those who left school will doubtless fall to receive the customary sweaters. Men receiving reserve letters are: Aleo, Blair, Freeze, and Garland Sad- These men certainly deserve a lot of praise even though they did not make the gade. They stuck wtih the squad and made the rest of the boys fight hard for what they received. Basketball letters were also announced by Coach Smith. Men who will receive letters in basketball are: Jones, Yelverton, Peterson, Bergin and Scarbrough. A little consideration may decide between Burk and Lay for a sixth letter. These two Boys have battled for a berth on the ti about evenly, and difficulty in naming one of them is being had by coach. LOOK TO THE LADIES IS CHALLENGE TO RICE FOR GIRL ATHLETICS Rice is catering to the men, as usual. In an effort to build up a football team (maybe), Rice will offer physical education courses to men. But the girls, poor things, can get their exercise on a crowded dance floor, clunched in the arms of stalwart football men. In fact, Rice's only provision for girl athletics is tumbling. The girls can tumble as long and as much as they want to, on Wednesdays. If the (Continued from Page 3) Boxing, a new course offered in physical education under the direction of Coach C. B. Smith, is expected to be organized here this year. College boxing teams will be formed from those taking the course, and work done in boxing will count as physical education credit. An all- campus boxinug tournament may be held in a few weeks, depending on the amount of interest the students show. i too late to form a college boxing team that will be able to compete ith other schools this season. The object this term will be more to get students interested and have a team that next year will win honors in A. !. boxing circles. LOCAL BOXERS LOSE Good Showing Made by Long and Wallace " Tourney Junior College was well represented fn the Press-Salesmanship boxing tournament, held at the auritodium last week, by "Big" Walace and Donald Long, two promising scrappers, who will bear watching in the future. Before a crowd of some three thousand fans, these two boys made their first appearance in the ring. Long lost a close decision io Bert Friedburg of the Y. M. C. A„ while Wallace who was outweighed 30 pounds, lost to Dan Rogers of the Ford plant. Owing to Long's lack of experience he was greatly handicapped in the first round. Friedburg took the first stanza of the fight with a series of rabbit punches anti body blows. Long mixed it the full round but failed to click perfectly. The second round was a mitt-slinging affair for Long. He tore into Frieburg and fed him leather from every (Continued on page 3) Leather pushers Organize To Promote Gentle Art Of Fisticuffs in School BIG TIME ENJOYED AT SOPH-FROSH HOP Gymnasium Is Scene of Lively Class Struggle Yes, it was a success. That is, the long-looked for Freshman-Sophomore dance, which was held in the Junior College gym on the night of Marcu t, was one grand hop. The gym was crowded, and the jazz usic from the blaring saxaphones, the cornet, and the piano, could scarcely be heard above the din of wayward feet keeping time to the latest song hits played by Matt Britts' Sylvan Beach Orchestra. Due to the unusual number of stags present, the intermissions were few in number and short in length. Indeed, the gentlemen, wu. could always find a partner was most fortunate. The dance ended at 12:15, leaving the Freshman tired but happy—and the sophisticated Sophomores pleased with their dance. LIBRARY COMMITTEE CONSIDERS PURCHASE OF REFERENCE BOOKS The Library committee is considering the purchase of more books. The books under consideration are those pertaining to history, English and biology. Not all of the large order of books which were delivered several weeks ago arrived. The publishers said they were not in stock at present, but that they would be sent later. Some of the new magazines which have arrived are: Current History, Golden-Book, Review of Review, Monitor, and The Scientific Monthly. These books may be found on the west side of the library. The library now contains books covering practically all the outside reading required in the various taught in Junior College. Pray for the Lights to Go Out Now don't get excited and tell something you shouldn't for we were only inquiring about the unusual incident that happened last week. Bill Jeter said he was on his knees praying to pass that English test, when all at once the lights flickered. Well, BUI, you got some consideration, even though you didn't pass the teat Mr. Harris undauntedly carried on his lecture in the dark. When he had finished someone struck a match and found seven-eights of the class had succumbed to slumber. Coach Smith a class was very quiet during the period of darkness. Yes, they all quietly left the room. Mr. South failed to gather In lots of cash because it was so dark he couldn't see how to write receipts. It is rumored that someone tipped the building superintendent a few shekels so they could leave school early and go to one of the various rat races in town. Mr. Birney didn't even come to his class at 8:30. He surely did the wrong thing, for Harry Seaman, C. R. Rawlinson and Lonntu Lyon were all up there studying to beat—oh! pardon! I forgot it was supposed to have been dark. Well, anyway they were there because the writer passed by to see how the class was progressing without him. The cafeteria was packed to capacity. That's funny, you never heard of our students all eating at one time before. Well anyway, Mr. Dupre was there with his flashlight, so we will assume that nothing malicious happened. I didn't go outside to scout around out there but someone said there wasn't a soul in sight. Yeah, I reckon so with all the lights out. Dorothy Dixon came down the main corridor looking for a light. She said the girls gym class had just got half dressed, and now they couldn't see a thing. Many offers from the boys were refused, when they volunteered to strike a match for her. One thing is certain and that is we'll have to arrange to have the lights act queefly when our Glee Club puts on another "Trial of Mary Dugan," show. CITIZENSHIP THEME OFDR.RUSSEL'STALK TO JUNIOR COLLEGE Educator Advises Young People to Solve Life's Problems at the Outset "We must be worthy citizens in our daily tasks," Dr. Daniel Russell said in his speech delivered before the students of the Houston Junior College in their assembly meeting Wednesday night. Dr. Russell received his highest degree from the University of Chicago. Then he spent a great deal of time in Chicago and elsewhere doing research work in trying to build better citizen- snip. Not only in voting must we be good citizens, but in the little things, ha said. "There are many problems confronting boys and girls. I wonder what you are thinking," he continued. "One thing that each of you is thinking is what am I going to do when 1 finish this school life. Only you can solve the problem. The first thing to think," he stated, "is what do I want to do. What is your interest? Where does your ability lie? People waste time taking courses in which they have no ability. The second thing in the choice of an occupation is, are you willing to work? If you are willing to work, you can do anything taking Into consideration the above factors." He talked about one's philosophy o£ life. But he said he did not want to scare anybody with that term. "What is right and wrong? Is it right for me to vote?" These were questions that had to be considered in forming one's philoa- ophy, he said. "Bad citizenship begins in public schools. There is more forgery In. public schools than anywhere else and It goes unpunished," he continued. 'There should be student honesty." He related a story about having >een an old classmate of his in the penitentiary who used to copy on ex- inations. He said he did not mean that everybody who had copied In school would eventually go to tuu penitentiary, but that more bad citizenship began in schools than anywhere. "If other people think for you in school you will get in the habit of letting them do it. It develops an inferiority complex," brought out Dr. Russel. "How can boys and girls adjust themselves to the responsibility or a home," he asked. "This responsibility is so great that those who delay taking it do it better." Professor Black who had been sitting on the stage rose and thanked Dr_ Russell, and invited him to come back. Professor Black said that he believed in giving credit where it was due and that it was Mrs. Russell who composed the speech that her husband delivered. Amid much applause sha. rose and bowed. Dr. Russel was introduced by Mr. Walter Jones who is the exalted ruler of the Elks. He said that Mr. RTis- sell's message was teh privilege wa have of citizenship which many of us do not realize. The Elks Lodge is sponsoring thj numbers of speeches that Dr. Russell is making In the schools here. Dr. Russell is well acquainted with several members of tho Junior College faculty. Anyone knows that anyone who loves tests is a sap. Well, there are precious few saps at H. J. C, The reinstatement exams have been attended by a few—all others could Invent excuses for absence. Advance Info: A new member, un- elected as yet, will be added to the faculty next term. He will help Mr. Porter pound math into freshman head3. and he will take over the physics department. Mr. Bishkin will devote all his time to chemistry.
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