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The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1929
File 003
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The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1929 - File 003. February 1929. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 18, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/14/show/12.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1929). The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1929 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/14/show/12

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1929 - File 003, February 1929, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 18, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/14/show/12.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1929
Contributor
  • Kaplan, Isadore
Date February 1929
Language English
Description From masthead: "Published Monthly by Journalism Students. Official Publication of Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript THE COUGAR THREE BOOK SHOP ANTHOLOGY OF WORLD POETRY. Edited by Mark Van Doren Poetry lovers, if compelled to limit their choice to one volume, would, without doubt, choose above this anthology. In editing the book, Mr. Van Doren has selected the best of the available English) translations from some fifteen ancient and modern languages and has arranged them in chronological sequence fronam the 35th century B. C. to the 20th century A. D. The translators are all poets who have produced distinguished original works and they cover a period of time extending from Chaucei to the present day. Besides the translations from other literatures there are 274 pages of English and American poems, which, in the main, are better than the translations, for poetry Inevitably loses some of tis spontaneity and originality when translated into another language. The editor says in his preface: "Not all the poets, of course, are here For my purpose was out to represent' these various poetical literatures . . . This is an anthology 0f the world's best poetry in the best English I could unearth and when I found no good English at all I left the poet out." The different varieties of poems and the length of some of the best of them necessarily Prohibit a series of representative quotations. However, the following translation, "critics*" from the Latin by Sir John Harrington is an amusing bit of philosophy characteristic of many of the shorter poems: The readers and the hearers like my books And yet some writers cannot then digest But what care I? For when I maki a feast, I would my guests should praise it, not the cooks. But the book can speak Cor itself better than can any review of it and to those who are interested in poetry it is enthusiastically recommended. —Louise Sheppard. WHITHER MANKIND. Charles Beard. This volume puts forth in its utmost capacity the inevitable jncreas ing trend of western civilization. The reader is quickly led to understand that the labors expected are not merely to give information but to advance two realizations; first, that "modern machines and science are such inescapable things that those who refuse to face them are-condemned in advance to sterility and defeat," second, the accusation that western civilization is unatenalistic is untrue, for as a matter of fact, the richest spiritual gifts of today are the results of a scientific, machine organized western culture. It seems that the material for this book was collected and printed in order to reveal to the world that western civilization is not in the throes of an inevitable decline. Sixteen of our best known authors were asked for the following contributions. Emil Ludwlg appeara with one of his foremost essays, "War and Peace," then comes C. E. a. Wins- low to brighten the scene with an article on "Health." hi order to bring out racial problems Y. A. Dorsey wit" two other writers, H. Shih and H. Van Loon, submitted these three essays. "Race anil Civilization," "Eastern and Western Civilization" and "Ancient and Medieval Civilization." Variou* other essays were chosen, such as "The Family," by Have'ock Ellis. "Religion," by J- H. Robinson, "The Arts," by Lewis Mumford. "philosophy," by John Dewey, "Play," by S. Chase. "Education," by E. D. Martin "Literature," by Carl Van Doren and Bertrand Russell vouches for the title with his essay on "Science." Tne last three are of equal importance. "Business," by Julius Klein. "Labor," by the Webbs, and "Law and Government," by Howard McBaln. Each essay in this volume is: worth at least a half daye discus sion. If we get down to facts we will find that many contributions have been made to western civilization from the great religious and philosophies of the east. To the American youth this book will have a more or less dull, dry rotuine, but to the college student who is interested in the development of his or her country, there will be a tinge of gratitude toward the composer for ability to select ideal literature. (This book may be obtained at Swifts, Inc., of this city for S3.) —C. R. Rawlinson. WHO ZOO The Tadlocks! There couldn't be so much develment in one person— so it's divided between these great big handsome twins. Here Marian Cadwell says there must be some mistake in identity.) And some more twins, Rosa and Elizabeth Deutsch. Really, Reagan had some cute girls last year. What! You don't mean to say you don't know the combination to lockev I? Why, everybody else does—it's ritten in pencil on that bust of James Russell Lowell just above the locker. (Watch Joe run to erase it.) We are literally "stormed" with, questions as to who the "brunette in the red hat" is.' Miss Rosalind Rain- bolt, sir. What a haudsome young stranger! It must be nice to be popular with the young ladies, like Bob Cole Is. It looks as though Jimmy Hooton is fast overcoming his belief of being girl-shy. Well—he has some excellent tutors in "Bubber" Armstrong and Joe Jacobs. No wonder "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes." Look who they're thinking of—Doiothy Downman. Well, girls don't cry. He may have quit—but he continues to haunt our halls—does Ralph Miller. Mr. Dupree—we have j thought of a way to keep peace and harmony during assembly. Just take either Reagan, Marshall or all the freshman out, and the noise Oh, no! Barr, Bender, Vincent and Gates are not visitors. They're home folks now. And among the other ex-Aggies are those poor little boys, Bill Bailey Sam Swisher who "just can't, get used to the presence of members of the opposite sex" in their classroom. However, they are doing their best to get over their shyness. If Helen Leu continues to stay away on Tuesday and Thursday, Mrs. Bender should charge Dudley Ellis for the use of her telephone—by the hour, too. They will all have it sooner or later, Nancy Riddle, says. Yes—they will if they think they'll look half as cute as you do. Mrs. Bender says that many stu dents come to college to get atmos phere. Yeah—maybe that's why sc many get the air. "In order to get everyone interest ed in 'The Cougar'," Mrs. Binney says, "it is necessary to put their names in the paper." Lonnie Lyons suggests printing the enrollment list. A lady on trial in New York says she cannot remember shooting he: husband in November. Like most of us—she didn't keep her diary after February. Mr. Ledlow, when reproached by his wife because he no longer gives her presents since he married her, exclaimed: "But my dear, did you ever hear of a freshman feeding bait to a fish after he caught it?1 Roy Phillips and Emmet Morgan are two good reasons why A. and should be jealous of Junior College. These boys are earstwhile students hi the Cadet School. Blonde, beautiful but not so dumb, is Mary Elizabeth Riggs. We must pause in our happiness f express condolence to the bereaved Anny Ray Qualtro. 'Spose you kno' that Pred Mosk has gone to State. Sh! Just a bit of campus gossil Yonder comes Gertrude Beard wit a brand new suitor in her train. She never cared for eyes of blue, Harry has eyes of blue. With a happy grin and a word of cheer Pete Garrison ambles down the corridor. Wither away fair Rose, alias Dorothy Dixon? Gone to keep some heavy date I bet. Hiss! Hiss! Aron Kolmans, with lis trusty friends Brown and Batts vere out cannoeing—(Do you know vhat that means?) in the moonlight Have you all met "the sheik" of the institute? Step up J. D. Larkin and make- your vow—pardon, bow. Much to the disparagement of all the co-eds in Harris' public speaking class there is one male who refuses to surrender to the charms and conventions of various belles. Now what to do? He's got curly hair, and i dark and handsome. tall and Now that Frank ana Fred have deserted the halls, the gals find It hard to find someone tu "cut class' with. We miss you. Such "wooing" powers as Garald displayed in the play lead us to believe that he has been keeping a secret love affair from us. Now we you IS that rite? / Since the Glee Club program when Bab and Mix make such a striking appearance as "black faces," we are led to believe that they should—shall e say it—remain black. Will the person who tied knots m the girls clothes while they were swimming at the fourth period last Monday kindly report and "fight like Congratulations Mr. Harris on the new member of your family. Nov. we'll see some competition in the circle for "speaking rites." With the broad and urgent invitation that Dot Overstreet dishes out in the halls to a flame of hers we all expect a situation—to say the h>ast We wish to congratulate our profs. Since mid term they've all been to class on time and we haven't had to miss a class—Goody, goody. Ouch * Nichola Leonadus Lyons- why must you wear such a dull coT- ored chapeau? Why not a passionate purple? That callegiate gentleman Bill Jeter is still in our midst even after the mid term tests. Ain't we lucky? If anyone hears a yoddle at any time from 8:30 a. m. outside of Hen- dreson's window. Don't be alarmed, it is only Corine Spear's date arriving. Hats off to Mrs. Foster. She works hard and deserves a pat on the back, ence—"a pat on the back." School life is made up of working, loafing and worrying with loafing pre dominating. (Appologies to Mark.) Believe It or not the sophomores are jaring loose with the freshie' dance—March L MR. KERBOW DISCUSSES A-S REACTION QUIZ AS PERSONALITY TEST An unusual type of quiz for the purpose of testing the aggressive and submissive elements in personality was given by Mr. Kerbow in his educational-psychology class last week. For some reason it was given only to the boys. This type of quiz is called the A-S reaction" study and It Is a scale for measuring "ascendance-submission in personality." There are separate questions for men and women. The answers are checked by the Instructor giving the test, and then he takes each individual's paper and discusses it with him, or her as to what that individual is best fitted for. The questions are staged in such a way that the answers make it possible for to be determined how much executiv ability a person has; whether or n< he is capable of leadership and ho much. Examples of te questions are as follows: "If you feel a person is dictatorial and domineering, do you as a rule make it a point to avoid him?" This is one of the few questions that can be answered by either "yes" or "no." The more usual type of question is the following: "Have you crossed the street to avoid meeting some person?" This question lias three possible answers: "Frequently," "occasionally," "never." Most of the questions present situations every person has experienced. Mr. Kerbow has a companion pamphlet to the questions which contains the answers with the numbe:- of points each answer deserves by it. It is possible for one to make as many eighty-two points. Those in ins ' column usually make from sixty-four to twenty-four points, wliil* the ones in the lowest column, or "S" column, AUSTRALIAN APPRAISER OF FEMININE FEATURES UKES LOCAL COLORING Here'p a message Houston girls from a connoiseur of beauty visiting from Australia. When <juestioned in regard to how- girls here compare with natural pink cheeked damsels of Australia the (could be called peace promoter) young man answered, "very favorably." Just think, girlies, even with our drug store color to be as attractive as Australian competition. As far, as short skirts were concerned one enterprising youth (without blushing) remarked that they are seeing something in the way of pretty knees, but nothing new. Now when the folks say no to that short skirt just keep this notation handy. One more word in favor of the girls in question, judging by the enthusiasm of the hoy friends in speaking of them, they must certainly be a peppy lot. And, being but human myself I ceased questioning the B. F. from Australia. make anywhere irom minus five to minus ten points and average ranges from plus five to plus one o" zero to minus four. A plus score indicates responses which show ascendance, while a minus score denotes submissive reactions. This test was compiled by Gorlon W. Allport and Floyd H. Alipon, who are two of the most outstanding social psychologists in this country. They have written many prominent textbooks, several of which are in the Junior College library. This examination is not a regular part of the course in which Mr. Kerbow is instructing, but It was his desire to be of some help to this group of of fifteen boys and he chose this means. ^Sakowitz: J\ro Correct Clothes for Young Men "Husbands and wives may meet heaven—but some of them won't if they see each other first." "Love Is the sparkle in the champagne, matrimony the headache that follows." "That old saw about marrying man to get rid of him isn't a jok< It's the best way." "Venus may have been the most popular young lady of her time— " it takes a clever huntress like Diana to get any attention nowadays." WOOD & PURDY SPORTING GOODS COMPANY Athletic Outfitters :: Felt Emblems and Pennants Made to Order Hunting and Fishing Supplies Phone Preston 8234 1317 Capitol Avenue JENNINGS CLEANING AND DYEING SHOPPE H. F. Jennings 3000 CAROLINE STREET POST OFFICE PHARMACY Light Lunches — Special Toasted Sandwiches Chili and Tamales Prompt, Efficient Service to Students Printers — Stationers — Blank Book Makers STANDARD PRINTING & LITHO. COMPANY Phone Preston 3848 1207-1211 Capitol Avenue Opposite Post Office Fine Watch Repairing—Platinum Work—Diamond Setting Our Specialty Diamond Merchant BEN MBU-Jeweler Diamond Merchant 914 Capitol Avenue Phone Fairfax 0070
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